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Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of poly-3-d-hydroxybutyrate from xylose.

Sandström AG, Muñoz de Las Heras A, Portugal-Nunes D, Gorwa-Grauslund MF - AMB Express (2015)

Bottom Line: In the present study, the robust baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to produce PHB from xylose, the main pentose found in lignocellulosic biomass.PHB production from xylose was successfully demonstrated in shake-flasks experiments, with PHB yield of 1.17 ± 0.18 mg PHB g(-1) xylose.Under well-controlled fully aerobic conditions, a titer of 101.7 mg PHB L(-1) was reached within 48 hours, with a PHB yield of 1.99 ± 0.15 mg PHB g(-1) xylose, thereby demonstrating the potential of this host for PHB production from lignocellulose.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Applied Microbiology, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, PO Box 124, Lund, SE-221 00 Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Poly-3-d-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a promising biopolymer naturally produced by several bacterial species. In the present study, the robust baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to produce PHB from xylose, the main pentose found in lignocellulosic biomass. The PHB pathway genes from the well-characterized PHB producer Cupriavidus necator were introduced in recombinant S. cerevisiae strains already capable of pentose utilization by introduction of the fungal genes for xylose utilization from the yeast Scheffersomyces stipitis. PHB production from xylose was successfully demonstrated in shake-flasks experiments, with PHB yield of 1.17 ± 0.18 mg PHB g(-1) xylose. Under well-controlled fully aerobic conditions, a titer of 101.7 mg PHB L(-1) was reached within 48 hours, with a PHB yield of 1.99 ± 0.15 mg PHB g(-1) xylose, thereby demonstrating the potential of this host for PHB production from lignocellulose.

No MeSH data available.


Representative fully aerobic batch growth and metabolite profile from recombinantS. cerevisiaestrain TMB 4443 (PHB+) in xylose defined medium at pH 5.5 using a well-controlled bioreactor.Legend: xylose(■); biomass(●); glycerol(♦); ethanol(▲); PHB(□); xylitol(○); acetate(◊).
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Fig3: Representative fully aerobic batch growth and metabolite profile from recombinantS. cerevisiaestrain TMB 4443 (PHB+) in xylose defined medium at pH 5.5 using a well-controlled bioreactor.Legend: xylose(■); biomass(●); glycerol(♦); ethanol(▲); PHB(□); xylitol(○); acetate(◊).

Mentions: As acetate levels were high and xylose utilization stopped before depletion, PHB production was also evaluated in another set-up using well-aerated and pH-controlled bioreactor for strain TMB 4443 (PHB+). Under these conditions, full xylose consumption was observed within 48 hours (Figure 3) and biomass accumulation was very high in comparison to the shake flask-experiments. Also, acetate, ethanol and xylitol production was significantly reduced. At the end of the exponential phase (48 hours), maximum biomass accumulation was reached and cellular PHB reached 0.49 ± 0.06% PHB/CDW, corresponding to a PHB yield of 1.99 ± 0.15 mg PHB g−1 xylose (Figure 3, Table 3).Figure 3


Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of poly-3-d-hydroxybutyrate from xylose.

Sandström AG, Muñoz de Las Heras A, Portugal-Nunes D, Gorwa-Grauslund MF - AMB Express (2015)

Representative fully aerobic batch growth and metabolite profile from recombinantS. cerevisiaestrain TMB 4443 (PHB+) in xylose defined medium at pH 5.5 using a well-controlled bioreactor.Legend: xylose(■); biomass(●); glycerol(♦); ethanol(▲); PHB(□); xylitol(○); acetate(◊).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385036&req=5

Fig3: Representative fully aerobic batch growth and metabolite profile from recombinantS. cerevisiaestrain TMB 4443 (PHB+) in xylose defined medium at pH 5.5 using a well-controlled bioreactor.Legend: xylose(■); biomass(●); glycerol(♦); ethanol(▲); PHB(□); xylitol(○); acetate(◊).
Mentions: As acetate levels were high and xylose utilization stopped before depletion, PHB production was also evaluated in another set-up using well-aerated and pH-controlled bioreactor for strain TMB 4443 (PHB+). Under these conditions, full xylose consumption was observed within 48 hours (Figure 3) and biomass accumulation was very high in comparison to the shake flask-experiments. Also, acetate, ethanol and xylitol production was significantly reduced. At the end of the exponential phase (48 hours), maximum biomass accumulation was reached and cellular PHB reached 0.49 ± 0.06% PHB/CDW, corresponding to a PHB yield of 1.99 ± 0.15 mg PHB g−1 xylose (Figure 3, Table 3).Figure 3

Bottom Line: In the present study, the robust baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to produce PHB from xylose, the main pentose found in lignocellulosic biomass.PHB production from xylose was successfully demonstrated in shake-flasks experiments, with PHB yield of 1.17 ± 0.18 mg PHB g(-1) xylose.Under well-controlled fully aerobic conditions, a titer of 101.7 mg PHB L(-1) was reached within 48 hours, with a PHB yield of 1.99 ± 0.15 mg PHB g(-1) xylose, thereby demonstrating the potential of this host for PHB production from lignocellulose.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Applied Microbiology, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, PO Box 124, Lund, SE-221 00 Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Poly-3-d-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a promising biopolymer naturally produced by several bacterial species. In the present study, the robust baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to produce PHB from xylose, the main pentose found in lignocellulosic biomass. The PHB pathway genes from the well-characterized PHB producer Cupriavidus necator were introduced in recombinant S. cerevisiae strains already capable of pentose utilization by introduction of the fungal genes for xylose utilization from the yeast Scheffersomyces stipitis. PHB production from xylose was successfully demonstrated in shake-flasks experiments, with PHB yield of 1.17 ± 0.18 mg PHB g(-1) xylose. Under well-controlled fully aerobic conditions, a titer of 101.7 mg PHB L(-1) was reached within 48 hours, with a PHB yield of 1.99 ± 0.15 mg PHB g(-1) xylose, thereby demonstrating the potential of this host for PHB production from lignocellulose.

No MeSH data available.