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Evaluation of crown-root angulation of lateral incisors adjacent to palatally impacted canines.

Kanavakis G, Curran KM, Wiseman KC, Barone NP, Finkelman MD, Srinivasan S, Lee MB, Trotman CA - Prog Orthod (2015)

Bottom Line: A significant (p = 0.009) difference of 2.3° in crown-to-root angulation was found between groups.In addition, clinicians are somewhat able to predict if a canine is palatally impacted by visually observing the crown-to-root angulation of the adjacent lateral incisor.Evaluating the crown-to-root angulation of a lateral incisor on a panoramic image might facilitate an early diagnosis of palatally impacted canines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective of this study is to explore differences in crown-to-root angulation between lateral incisors adjacent to palatally impacted canines (PICs) and lateral incisors adjacent to normally erupted canines (NECs).

Methods: Orthodontic records of 100 subjects (51 with PICs and 49 with NECs) were reviewed. Crown-to-root angulations of all lateral incisors were measured manually on the final panoramic radiographs. Also, three experienced orthodontists were asked to visually inspect the morphology of the lateral incisors on the panoramic radiographs. A mixed model was used to test the difference in crown-to-root angulation of the lateral incisor between the experimental and the control groups. The association between the examiners' observations and the presence of a canine impaction was assessed by means of a chi-square test. All analyses were performed at the 0.05 level of statistical significance.

Results: A significant (p = 0.009) difference of 2.3° in crown-to-root angulation was found between groups. Also, 66.7% of the lateral incisors that were identified as "abnormal" by the panel of orthodontists were adjacent to a PIC. A percentage of 65.2 of lateral incisors that were identified as "normal" were located adjacent to NECs.

Conclusions: The root of lateral incisors adjacent to PICs is angulated more mesially compared to lateral incisors adjacent to NECs. In addition, clinicians are somewhat able to predict if a canine is palatally impacted by visually observing the crown-to-root angulation of the adjacent lateral incisor. Evaluating the crown-to-root angulation of a lateral incisor on a panoramic image might facilitate an early diagnosis of palatally impacted canines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bland-Altman graph displaying the inter-rater reliability in measurements.
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Fig4: Bland-Altman graph displaying the inter-rater reliability in measurements.

Mentions: The results for the Bland-Altman plot for inter-rater reliability are presented in Figure 4. The average difference in measurement between the two investigators was 3°; however, in a few instances, this difference was as high as 12°. In order to reduce random error, the average measurement of the two investigators was used for all statistical analyses.Figure 4


Evaluation of crown-root angulation of lateral incisors adjacent to palatally impacted canines.

Kanavakis G, Curran KM, Wiseman KC, Barone NP, Finkelman MD, Srinivasan S, Lee MB, Trotman CA - Prog Orthod (2015)

Bland-Altman graph displaying the inter-rater reliability in measurements.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385030&req=5

Fig4: Bland-Altman graph displaying the inter-rater reliability in measurements.
Mentions: The results for the Bland-Altman plot for inter-rater reliability are presented in Figure 4. The average difference in measurement between the two investigators was 3°; however, in a few instances, this difference was as high as 12°. In order to reduce random error, the average measurement of the two investigators was used for all statistical analyses.Figure 4

Bottom Line: A significant (p = 0.009) difference of 2.3° in crown-to-root angulation was found between groups.In addition, clinicians are somewhat able to predict if a canine is palatally impacted by visually observing the crown-to-root angulation of the adjacent lateral incisor.Evaluating the crown-to-root angulation of a lateral incisor on a panoramic image might facilitate an early diagnosis of palatally impacted canines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective of this study is to explore differences in crown-to-root angulation between lateral incisors adjacent to palatally impacted canines (PICs) and lateral incisors adjacent to normally erupted canines (NECs).

Methods: Orthodontic records of 100 subjects (51 with PICs and 49 with NECs) were reviewed. Crown-to-root angulations of all lateral incisors were measured manually on the final panoramic radiographs. Also, three experienced orthodontists were asked to visually inspect the morphology of the lateral incisors on the panoramic radiographs. A mixed model was used to test the difference in crown-to-root angulation of the lateral incisor between the experimental and the control groups. The association between the examiners' observations and the presence of a canine impaction was assessed by means of a chi-square test. All analyses were performed at the 0.05 level of statistical significance.

Results: A significant (p = 0.009) difference of 2.3° in crown-to-root angulation was found between groups. Also, 66.7% of the lateral incisors that were identified as "abnormal" by the panel of orthodontists were adjacent to a PIC. A percentage of 65.2 of lateral incisors that were identified as "normal" were located adjacent to NECs.

Conclusions: The root of lateral incisors adjacent to PICs is angulated more mesially compared to lateral incisors adjacent to NECs. In addition, clinicians are somewhat able to predict if a canine is palatally impacted by visually observing the crown-to-root angulation of the adjacent lateral incisor. Evaluating the crown-to-root angulation of a lateral incisor on a panoramic image might facilitate an early diagnosis of palatally impacted canines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus