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Surface properties and biocompatibility of nanostructured TiO2 film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering.

Majeed A, He J, Jiao L, Zhong X, Sheng Z - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that TiO2 films deposited on unbiased as well as biased substrates are all amorphous.Surface properties such as surface roughness and wettability of TiO2 films, grown in a plasma environment, under biased and unbiased substrate conditions are reported according to the said parameters of RF power and the working pressures.The effects of roughness and hydrophilicity of nanostructured TiO2 films on cell density and cell spreading have been discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 China ; Department of Physics, University of Azad Jammu & Kashmir, Muzaffarabad, A.K Pakistan.

ABSTRACT
Nanostructured TiO2 films are deposited on a silicon substrate using 150-W power from the RF magnetron sputtering at working pressures of 3 to 5 Pa, with no substrate bias, and at 3 Pa with a substrate bias of -50 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that TiO2 films deposited on unbiased as well as biased substrates are all amorphous. Surface properties such as surface roughness and wettability of TiO2 films, grown in a plasma environment, under biased and unbiased substrate conditions are reported according to the said parameters of RF power and the working pressures. Primary rat osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) cells have been cultured on nanostructured TiO2 films fabricated at different conditions of substrate bias and working pressures. The effects of roughness and hydrophilicity of nanostructured TiO2 films on cell density and cell spreading have been discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of RF magnetron sputtering: 1) substrate stage, 2) glass substrates, 3) Ti targets, and 4) RF-powered electrode.
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Fig1: Schematic of RF magnetron sputtering: 1) substrate stage, 2) glass substrates, 3) Ti targets, and 4) RF-powered electrode.

Mentions: The TiO2 films were deposited by using RF magnetron sputtering system (JGP-450 A, China), whose schematic diagram is shown in the Figure 1. For the deposition of thin films, silicon and titanium were used as the substrate and target materials, respectively. The purity of the titanium target fixed on the magnetron cathode was 99.9% with a diameter of 60 mm (Beijing General Research Institute for Non-Ferrous Metals, China). The silicon substrate (100) with a diameter of 25.4 mm was mounted on the substrate stage separated at a distance of 70 mm from the titanium target. Before mounting the silicon substrate onto the substrate stage in the vacuum chamber, it was cleaned ultrasonically in acetone followed by ethanol and finally in deionized water for 15 min in each solution and dried thereafter. A pumping system comprising of mechanical and the turbo-molecular pumps was implied to achieve the base pressure down to 1.4 × 10−3 Pa inside the chamber. In order to remove the residual gases, the chamber was heated along with the pumping. Argon and oxygen, as sputtering and reactive gases, with a purity of 99.99% and 99.95%, respectively, were introduced into the chamber one after another and controlled by standard mass flow controllers (Beijing Jianzhong Machine Co. Ltd., China). The gas pressure was adjusted with the help of a throttle valve. The ZDF-2 AK compound vacuum meter (Beijing Xinhua Vacuum Instrument Factory, China) was used to monitor the vacuum pressure in the chamber. Prior to thin-film deposition, Ti ceramic target was pre-sputtered in an argon environment for 10 min by RF power supply working at a frequency of 13.56 MHz to weed out the surface adsorptions and contaminations. The effect of working pressures of 3 and 5 Pa, on the surface morphology of the films at an RF power of 150 W, without bias was studied by depositing TiO2 films on silicon substrates for 5 h in each case. Also, a sample at a working pressure of 3 Pa with a bias of −50 V at an RF power of 150 W for 5 h was prepared/deposited so as to compare the surface morphologies of the films with and without bias. The substrate temperature was measured with a thermocouple in contact with the surface of the substrate. The flow rates utilized for argon and oxygen were staying constant, that is 30 and 10 sccm (i.e., standard cubic centimeter per minute), respectively, during the whole experiment. The summary of the deposition condition is given in Table 1.Figure 1


Surface properties and biocompatibility of nanostructured TiO2 film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering.

Majeed A, He J, Jiao L, Zhong X, Sheng Z - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Schematic of RF magnetron sputtering: 1) substrate stage, 2) glass substrates, 3) Ti targets, and 4) RF-powered electrode.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385009&req=5

Fig1: Schematic of RF magnetron sputtering: 1) substrate stage, 2) glass substrates, 3) Ti targets, and 4) RF-powered electrode.
Mentions: The TiO2 films were deposited by using RF magnetron sputtering system (JGP-450 A, China), whose schematic diagram is shown in the Figure 1. For the deposition of thin films, silicon and titanium were used as the substrate and target materials, respectively. The purity of the titanium target fixed on the magnetron cathode was 99.9% with a diameter of 60 mm (Beijing General Research Institute for Non-Ferrous Metals, China). The silicon substrate (100) with a diameter of 25.4 mm was mounted on the substrate stage separated at a distance of 70 mm from the titanium target. Before mounting the silicon substrate onto the substrate stage in the vacuum chamber, it was cleaned ultrasonically in acetone followed by ethanol and finally in deionized water for 15 min in each solution and dried thereafter. A pumping system comprising of mechanical and the turbo-molecular pumps was implied to achieve the base pressure down to 1.4 × 10−3 Pa inside the chamber. In order to remove the residual gases, the chamber was heated along with the pumping. Argon and oxygen, as sputtering and reactive gases, with a purity of 99.99% and 99.95%, respectively, were introduced into the chamber one after another and controlled by standard mass flow controllers (Beijing Jianzhong Machine Co. Ltd., China). The gas pressure was adjusted with the help of a throttle valve. The ZDF-2 AK compound vacuum meter (Beijing Xinhua Vacuum Instrument Factory, China) was used to monitor the vacuum pressure in the chamber. Prior to thin-film deposition, Ti ceramic target was pre-sputtered in an argon environment for 10 min by RF power supply working at a frequency of 13.56 MHz to weed out the surface adsorptions and contaminations. The effect of working pressures of 3 and 5 Pa, on the surface morphology of the films at an RF power of 150 W, without bias was studied by depositing TiO2 films on silicon substrates for 5 h in each case. Also, a sample at a working pressure of 3 Pa with a bias of −50 V at an RF power of 150 W for 5 h was prepared/deposited so as to compare the surface morphologies of the films with and without bias. The substrate temperature was measured with a thermocouple in contact with the surface of the substrate. The flow rates utilized for argon and oxygen were staying constant, that is 30 and 10 sccm (i.e., standard cubic centimeter per minute), respectively, during the whole experiment. The summary of the deposition condition is given in Table 1.Figure 1

Bottom Line: X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that TiO2 films deposited on unbiased as well as biased substrates are all amorphous.Surface properties such as surface roughness and wettability of TiO2 films, grown in a plasma environment, under biased and unbiased substrate conditions are reported according to the said parameters of RF power and the working pressures.The effects of roughness and hydrophilicity of nanostructured TiO2 films on cell density and cell spreading have been discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 China ; Department of Physics, University of Azad Jammu & Kashmir, Muzaffarabad, A.K Pakistan.

ABSTRACT
Nanostructured TiO2 films are deposited on a silicon substrate using 150-W power from the RF magnetron sputtering at working pressures of 3 to 5 Pa, with no substrate bias, and at 3 Pa with a substrate bias of -50 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that TiO2 films deposited on unbiased as well as biased substrates are all amorphous. Surface properties such as surface roughness and wettability of TiO2 films, grown in a plasma environment, under biased and unbiased substrate conditions are reported according to the said parameters of RF power and the working pressures. Primary rat osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) cells have been cultured on nanostructured TiO2 films fabricated at different conditions of substrate bias and working pressures. The effects of roughness and hydrophilicity of nanostructured TiO2 films on cell density and cell spreading have been discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus