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Contribution of soil esterase to biodegradation of aliphatic polyester agricultural mulch film in cultivated soils.

Yamamoto-Tamura K, Hiradate S, Watanabe T, Koitabashi M, Sameshima-Yamashita Y, Yarimizu T, Kitamoto H - AMB Express (2015)

Bottom Line: The soil, where the film was degraded the fastest, recorded large PBSA-degrading fungal population and showed high esterase activity compared with the other soil samples throughout the incubation period.Meanwhile, esterase activity and viable counts of PBSA-degrading fungi were found to be stable in soils without PBSA film.These results suggest that the higher the distribution ratio of native PBSA-degrading fungi in the soil, the faster the film degradation is.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8604 Japan.

ABSTRACT
The relationship between degradation speed of soil-buried biodegradable polyester film in a farmland and the characteristics of the predominant polyester-degrading soil microorganisms and enzymes were investigated to determine the BP-degrading ability of cultivated soils through characterization of the basal microbial activities and their transition in soils during BP film degradation. Degradation of poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) film was evaluated in soil samples from different cultivated fields in Japan for 4 weeks. Both the degradation speed of the PBSA film and the esterase activity were found to be correlated with the ratio of colonies that produced clear zone on fungal minimum medium-agarose plate with emulsified PBSA to the total number colonies counted. Time-dependent change in viable counts of the PBSA-degrading fungi and esterase activities were monitored in soils where buried films showed the most and the least degree of degradation. During the degradation of PBSA film, the viable counts of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activities in soils, which adhered to the PBSA film, increased with time. The soil, where the film was degraded the fastest, recorded large PBSA-degrading fungal population and showed high esterase activity compared with the other soil samples throughout the incubation period. Meanwhile, esterase activity and viable counts of PBSA-degrading fungi were found to be stable in soils without PBSA film. These results suggest that the higher the distribution ratio of native PBSA-degrading fungi in the soil, the faster the film degradation is. This could be due to the rapid accumulation of secreted esterases in these soils.

No MeSH data available.


The isolation rate of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activity. The scatter diagram shows the correlation between the isolation rate of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activity in different soils. P represents the significance, and ρ represents Spearman's correlation coefficient.
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Fig3: The isolation rate of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activity. The scatter diagram shows the correlation between the isolation rate of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activity in different soils. P represents the significance, and ρ represents Spearman's correlation coefficient.

Mentions: The isolation rates of the PBSA-degrading fungi were also found to be correlated with the esterase activities in the different soils (Spearman’s ρ = 0.67, P = 0.028) (Figure 3). The highest esterase activity was recorded in soil sample KIB (159.3 nmol g−1 min−1), and the lowest was found in MIY (22.9 nmol g−1 min−1).Figure 3


Contribution of soil esterase to biodegradation of aliphatic polyester agricultural mulch film in cultivated soils.

Yamamoto-Tamura K, Hiradate S, Watanabe T, Koitabashi M, Sameshima-Yamashita Y, Yarimizu T, Kitamoto H - AMB Express (2015)

The isolation rate of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activity. The scatter diagram shows the correlation between the isolation rate of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activity in different soils. P represents the significance, and ρ represents Spearman's correlation coefficient.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384995&req=5

Fig3: The isolation rate of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activity. The scatter diagram shows the correlation between the isolation rate of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activity in different soils. P represents the significance, and ρ represents Spearman's correlation coefficient.
Mentions: The isolation rates of the PBSA-degrading fungi were also found to be correlated with the esterase activities in the different soils (Spearman’s ρ = 0.67, P = 0.028) (Figure 3). The highest esterase activity was recorded in soil sample KIB (159.3 nmol g−1 min−1), and the lowest was found in MIY (22.9 nmol g−1 min−1).Figure 3

Bottom Line: The soil, where the film was degraded the fastest, recorded large PBSA-degrading fungal population and showed high esterase activity compared with the other soil samples throughout the incubation period.Meanwhile, esterase activity and viable counts of PBSA-degrading fungi were found to be stable in soils without PBSA film.These results suggest that the higher the distribution ratio of native PBSA-degrading fungi in the soil, the faster the film degradation is.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8604 Japan.

ABSTRACT
The relationship between degradation speed of soil-buried biodegradable polyester film in a farmland and the characteristics of the predominant polyester-degrading soil microorganisms and enzymes were investigated to determine the BP-degrading ability of cultivated soils through characterization of the basal microbial activities and their transition in soils during BP film degradation. Degradation of poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) film was evaluated in soil samples from different cultivated fields in Japan for 4 weeks. Both the degradation speed of the PBSA film and the esterase activity were found to be correlated with the ratio of colonies that produced clear zone on fungal minimum medium-agarose plate with emulsified PBSA to the total number colonies counted. Time-dependent change in viable counts of the PBSA-degrading fungi and esterase activities were monitored in soils where buried films showed the most and the least degree of degradation. During the degradation of PBSA film, the viable counts of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activities in soils, which adhered to the PBSA film, increased with time. The soil, where the film was degraded the fastest, recorded large PBSA-degrading fungal population and showed high esterase activity compared with the other soil samples throughout the incubation period. Meanwhile, esterase activity and viable counts of PBSA-degrading fungi were found to be stable in soils without PBSA film. These results suggest that the higher the distribution ratio of native PBSA-degrading fungi in the soil, the faster the film degradation is. This could be due to the rapid accumulation of secreted esterases in these soils.

No MeSH data available.