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Multidimensional effects of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter felis, and human lung (L132) and lung carcinoma A549 cells.

Gurunathan S, Jeong JK, Han JW, Zhang XF, Park JH, Kim JH - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, AgNPs induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells; conversely, AgNPs had no significant effects on L132 cells.The results from this study suggest that AgNPs could cause cell-specific apoptosis in mammalian cells.Our findings demonstrate that this environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs and that the prepared AgNPs have multidimensional effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activity against H. pylori and H. felis and also cytotoxic effects against human cancer cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-Dong, Gwanjgin-gu, 143-701 Seoul South Korea ; GS Institute of Bio and Nanotechnology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu India.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are prominent group of nanomaterials and are recognized for their diverse applications in various health sectors. This study aimed to synthesize the AgNPs using the leaf extract of Artemisia princeps as a bio-reductant. Furthermore, we evaluated the multidimensional effect of the biologically synthesized AgNPs in Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter felis, and human lung (L132) and lung carcinoma (A549) cells. UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy confirmed the synthesis of AgNPs. X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the AgNPs are specifically indexed to a crystal structure. The results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicate that biomolecules are involved in the synthesis and stabilization of AgNPs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies showed the average size distribution of the particle between 10 and 40 nm, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the AgNPs were significantly well separated and spherical with an average size of 20 nm. AgNPs caused dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and biofilm formation and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA fragmentation in H. pylori and H. felis. Furthermore, AgNPs induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells; conversely, AgNPs had no significant effects on L132 cells. The results from this study suggest that AgNPs could cause cell-specific apoptosis in mammalian cells. Our findings demonstrate that this environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs and that the prepared AgNPs have multidimensional effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activity against H. pylori and H. felis and also cytotoxic effects against human cancer cells. This report describes comprehensively the effects of AgNPs on bacteria and mammalian cells. We believe that biologically synthesized AgNPs will open a new avenue towards various biotechnological and biomedical applications in the near future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

FT-IR spectrum of silver nanoparticles synthesized by treating AgNO3with leaf extract.
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Fig3: FT-IR spectrum of silver nanoparticles synthesized by treating AgNO3with leaf extract.

Mentions: To identify the possible biomolecules involved in the reduction of the Ag+ by the extract of leaf broth, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements [22]. The silver nitrate solution after completing the reduction of Ag+ ions and the formation of AgNPs was centrifuged at 10,000 rpm for 15 min to isolate the AgNPs from free proteins [22]. The FTIR spectrum of AgNPs exhibits peaks at 1,727 and 1,638 cm−1 that are attributed to ester CdO groups of chlorophyll [22,60]. It is well known that water-soluble fractions of A. princeps leaves contain large amounts of secondary metabolites; these secondary metabolites may favor the synthesis of nanoparticles as reducing agents [31]. Terpenoids possibly contribute to the reduction of the silver ions that, in the process, are oxidized to carbonyl groups, resulting in a band at 1,727 cm−1. During the formation of AgNPs, the peak corresponding to the amide I band at 1,638 cm−1 broadened, which indicates capping of the AgNPs by protein (Figure 3). The absorption peak at 1,638 cm−1 may be ascribed to the carbonyl stretch in proteins, while the peaks at 3,398 cm−1 represent the OH stretching in alcohols and phenolic compounds [61-63]. The strong intense peaks at 1,387 and 1,638 cm−1 correspond to C-N stretch vibrations, as well as to the amide I bands of proteins in the leaf extract. The absorption peak at 1,638 cm−1 is close to that reported for native proteins [64]. This suggests that proteins are interacting with biosynthesized nanoparticles, and their secondary structure were not affected during the reaction with Ag+ ions. Proteins are able to bind with silver or gold nanoparticles either through free amine groups or cysteine residues in the proteins [65]. A similar mechanism may be involved when the leaf extract from A. princeps caps the AgNPs, thereby stabilizing the particles. Similarly, several other researchers found a similar FTIR pattern of AgNPs using geranium leaf extract [22], Ocimum sanctum leaf extract [66,67], and Camellia sinensis [62]. The results obtained from FTIR spectroscopy suggest that the leaf extracts have the ability to reduce and stabilize the AgNPs. The present results agree with those reported previously for Rhinacanthus nasutus [68], Thevetia peruviana [69], latex of Jatrophacurcas [67], O. sanctum leaf extract [63,66], and C. sinensis [62].Figure 3


Multidimensional effects of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter felis, and human lung (L132) and lung carcinoma A549 cells.

Gurunathan S, Jeong JK, Han JW, Zhang XF, Park JH, Kim JH - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

FT-IR spectrum of silver nanoparticles synthesized by treating AgNO3with leaf extract.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384991&req=5

Fig3: FT-IR spectrum of silver nanoparticles synthesized by treating AgNO3with leaf extract.
Mentions: To identify the possible biomolecules involved in the reduction of the Ag+ by the extract of leaf broth, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements [22]. The silver nitrate solution after completing the reduction of Ag+ ions and the formation of AgNPs was centrifuged at 10,000 rpm for 15 min to isolate the AgNPs from free proteins [22]. The FTIR spectrum of AgNPs exhibits peaks at 1,727 and 1,638 cm−1 that are attributed to ester CdO groups of chlorophyll [22,60]. It is well known that water-soluble fractions of A. princeps leaves contain large amounts of secondary metabolites; these secondary metabolites may favor the synthesis of nanoparticles as reducing agents [31]. Terpenoids possibly contribute to the reduction of the silver ions that, in the process, are oxidized to carbonyl groups, resulting in a band at 1,727 cm−1. During the formation of AgNPs, the peak corresponding to the amide I band at 1,638 cm−1 broadened, which indicates capping of the AgNPs by protein (Figure 3). The absorption peak at 1,638 cm−1 may be ascribed to the carbonyl stretch in proteins, while the peaks at 3,398 cm−1 represent the OH stretching in alcohols and phenolic compounds [61-63]. The strong intense peaks at 1,387 and 1,638 cm−1 correspond to C-N stretch vibrations, as well as to the amide I bands of proteins in the leaf extract. The absorption peak at 1,638 cm−1 is close to that reported for native proteins [64]. This suggests that proteins are interacting with biosynthesized nanoparticles, and their secondary structure were not affected during the reaction with Ag+ ions. Proteins are able to bind with silver or gold nanoparticles either through free amine groups or cysteine residues in the proteins [65]. A similar mechanism may be involved when the leaf extract from A. princeps caps the AgNPs, thereby stabilizing the particles. Similarly, several other researchers found a similar FTIR pattern of AgNPs using geranium leaf extract [22], Ocimum sanctum leaf extract [66,67], and Camellia sinensis [62]. The results obtained from FTIR spectroscopy suggest that the leaf extracts have the ability to reduce and stabilize the AgNPs. The present results agree with those reported previously for Rhinacanthus nasutus [68], Thevetia peruviana [69], latex of Jatrophacurcas [67], O. sanctum leaf extract [63,66], and C. sinensis [62].Figure 3

Bottom Line: Furthermore, AgNPs induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells; conversely, AgNPs had no significant effects on L132 cells.The results from this study suggest that AgNPs could cause cell-specific apoptosis in mammalian cells.Our findings demonstrate that this environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs and that the prepared AgNPs have multidimensional effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activity against H. pylori and H. felis and also cytotoxic effects against human cancer cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-Dong, Gwanjgin-gu, 143-701 Seoul South Korea ; GS Institute of Bio and Nanotechnology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu India.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are prominent group of nanomaterials and are recognized for their diverse applications in various health sectors. This study aimed to synthesize the AgNPs using the leaf extract of Artemisia princeps as a bio-reductant. Furthermore, we evaluated the multidimensional effect of the biologically synthesized AgNPs in Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter felis, and human lung (L132) and lung carcinoma (A549) cells. UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy confirmed the synthesis of AgNPs. X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the AgNPs are specifically indexed to a crystal structure. The results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicate that biomolecules are involved in the synthesis and stabilization of AgNPs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies showed the average size distribution of the particle between 10 and 40 nm, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the AgNPs were significantly well separated and spherical with an average size of 20 nm. AgNPs caused dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and biofilm formation and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA fragmentation in H. pylori and H. felis. Furthermore, AgNPs induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells; conversely, AgNPs had no significant effects on L132 cells. The results from this study suggest that AgNPs could cause cell-specific apoptosis in mammalian cells. Our findings demonstrate that this environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs and that the prepared AgNPs have multidimensional effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activity against H. pylori and H. felis and also cytotoxic effects against human cancer cells. This report describes comprehensively the effects of AgNPs on bacteria and mammalian cells. We believe that biologically synthesized AgNPs will open a new avenue towards various biotechnological and biomedical applications in the near future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus