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Multidimensional effects of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter felis, and human lung (L132) and lung carcinoma A549 cells.

Gurunathan S, Jeong JK, Han JW, Zhang XF, Park JH, Kim JH - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, AgNPs induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells; conversely, AgNPs had no significant effects on L132 cells.Our findings demonstrate that this environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs and that the prepared AgNPs have multidimensional effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activity against H. pylori and H. felis and also cytotoxic effects against human cancer cells.This report describes comprehensively the effects of AgNPs on bacteria and mammalian cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-Dong, Gwanjgin-gu, 143-701 Seoul South Korea ; GS Institute of Bio and Nanotechnology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu India.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are prominent group of nanomaterials and are recognized for their diverse applications in various health sectors. This study aimed to synthesize the AgNPs using the leaf extract of Artemisia princeps as a bio-reductant. Furthermore, we evaluated the multidimensional effect of the biologically synthesized AgNPs in Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter felis, and human lung (L132) and lung carcinoma (A549) cells. UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy confirmed the synthesis of AgNPs. X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the AgNPs are specifically indexed to a crystal structure. The results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicate that biomolecules are involved in the synthesis and stabilization of AgNPs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies showed the average size distribution of the particle between 10 and 40 nm, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the AgNPs were significantly well separated and spherical with an average size of 20 nm. AgNPs caused dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and biofilm formation and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA fragmentation in H. pylori and H. felis. Furthermore, AgNPs induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells; conversely, AgNPs had no significant effects on L132 cells. The results from this study suggest that AgNPs could cause cell-specific apoptosis in mammalian cells. Our findings demonstrate that this environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs and that the prepared AgNPs have multidimensional effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activity against H. pylori and H. felis and also cytotoxic effects against human cancer cells. This report describes comprehensively the effects of AgNPs on bacteria and mammalian cells. We believe that biologically synthesized AgNPs will open a new avenue towards various biotechnological and biomedical applications in the near future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of AgNPs on cell viability of L 132 and A549 cells. Cells were treated with various concentrations of AgNPs for 24 h, and cytotoxicity was determined by the MTT method. The results are expressed as the mean ± SD of three separate experiments each of which contained three replicates. Treated groups showed statistically significant differences from the control group by Student’s t-test (p < 0.05).
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Fig11: Effect of AgNPs on cell viability of L 132 and A549 cells. Cells were treated with various concentrations of AgNPs for 24 h, and cytotoxicity was determined by the MTT method. The results are expressed as the mean ± SD of three separate experiments each of which contained three replicates. Treated groups showed statistically significant differences from the control group by Student’s t-test (p < 0.05).

Mentions: Although several studies showed the potential toxicity of AgNPs in cancer cells [51,54], to see the cell-specific activity of AgNPs, the effects of AgNPs on cell viability were evaluated using human lung cancer A549 cells and normal human lung L-132 cells; we selected A549 cancer cells and L-132 normal cells for our study because entry through the respiratory tract is one of the most frequent routes by which nanomaterials may enter the body. It was also to compare the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles in cancer cells and normal cells. Therefore, we are interested to investigate whether normal cells and cancer cells differentially respond to AgNPs, to examine the effect of both the cells which were treated with various concentrations of AgNPs and measured cell viability. After 24 h of treatment with different AgNP concentrations, the A549-treated cells showed a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability compared to that of the control group, whereas there is no significant difference between AgNP-treated L132 cells and control group (Figure 11). The most apparent and noticeable effect following exposure of cells to toxic materials is the alteration in the cell shape or morphology of the monolayer culture [108]. The cell viability assays shows that A549 cells have significant inhibitory effect of AgNPs and are more sensitive than L132 lung normal cells (Figure 11). Our studies are consistent with previous studies which show that AgNP exposure could induce the changes of cell shape, reduce cell viability, increase LDH release, and finally result in cell apoptosis and necrosis [48,51,53,109-111].Figure 11


Multidimensional effects of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter felis, and human lung (L132) and lung carcinoma A549 cells.

Gurunathan S, Jeong JK, Han JW, Zhang XF, Park JH, Kim JH - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Effect of AgNPs on cell viability of L 132 and A549 cells. Cells were treated with various concentrations of AgNPs for 24 h, and cytotoxicity was determined by the MTT method. The results are expressed as the mean ± SD of three separate experiments each of which contained three replicates. Treated groups showed statistically significant differences from the control group by Student’s t-test (p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384991&req=5

Fig11: Effect of AgNPs on cell viability of L 132 and A549 cells. Cells were treated with various concentrations of AgNPs for 24 h, and cytotoxicity was determined by the MTT method. The results are expressed as the mean ± SD of three separate experiments each of which contained three replicates. Treated groups showed statistically significant differences from the control group by Student’s t-test (p < 0.05).
Mentions: Although several studies showed the potential toxicity of AgNPs in cancer cells [51,54], to see the cell-specific activity of AgNPs, the effects of AgNPs on cell viability were evaluated using human lung cancer A549 cells and normal human lung L-132 cells; we selected A549 cancer cells and L-132 normal cells for our study because entry through the respiratory tract is one of the most frequent routes by which nanomaterials may enter the body. It was also to compare the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles in cancer cells and normal cells. Therefore, we are interested to investigate whether normal cells and cancer cells differentially respond to AgNPs, to examine the effect of both the cells which were treated with various concentrations of AgNPs and measured cell viability. After 24 h of treatment with different AgNP concentrations, the A549-treated cells showed a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability compared to that of the control group, whereas there is no significant difference between AgNP-treated L132 cells and control group (Figure 11). The most apparent and noticeable effect following exposure of cells to toxic materials is the alteration in the cell shape or morphology of the monolayer culture [108]. The cell viability assays shows that A549 cells have significant inhibitory effect of AgNPs and are more sensitive than L132 lung normal cells (Figure 11). Our studies are consistent with previous studies which show that AgNP exposure could induce the changes of cell shape, reduce cell viability, increase LDH release, and finally result in cell apoptosis and necrosis [48,51,53,109-111].Figure 11

Bottom Line: Furthermore, AgNPs induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells; conversely, AgNPs had no significant effects on L132 cells.Our findings demonstrate that this environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs and that the prepared AgNPs have multidimensional effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activity against H. pylori and H. felis and also cytotoxic effects against human cancer cells.This report describes comprehensively the effects of AgNPs on bacteria and mammalian cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-Dong, Gwanjgin-gu, 143-701 Seoul South Korea ; GS Institute of Bio and Nanotechnology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu India.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are prominent group of nanomaterials and are recognized for their diverse applications in various health sectors. This study aimed to synthesize the AgNPs using the leaf extract of Artemisia princeps as a bio-reductant. Furthermore, we evaluated the multidimensional effect of the biologically synthesized AgNPs in Helicobacter pylori, Helicobacter felis, and human lung (L132) and lung carcinoma (A549) cells. UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy confirmed the synthesis of AgNPs. X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the AgNPs are specifically indexed to a crystal structure. The results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicate that biomolecules are involved in the synthesis and stabilization of AgNPs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies showed the average size distribution of the particle between 10 and 40 nm, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the AgNPs were significantly well separated and spherical with an average size of 20 nm. AgNPs caused dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and biofilm formation and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA fragmentation in H. pylori and H. felis. Furthermore, AgNPs induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells; conversely, AgNPs had no significant effects on L132 cells. The results from this study suggest that AgNPs could cause cell-specific apoptosis in mammalian cells. Our findings demonstrate that this environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs and that the prepared AgNPs have multidimensional effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activity against H. pylori and H. felis and also cytotoxic effects against human cancer cells. This report describes comprehensively the effects of AgNPs on bacteria and mammalian cells. We believe that biologically synthesized AgNPs will open a new avenue towards various biotechnological and biomedical applications in the near future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus