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Improving response inhibition in Parkinson's disease with atomoxetine.

Ye Z, Altena E, Nombela C, Housden CR, Maxwell H, Rittman T, Huddleston C, Rae CL, Regenthal R, Sahakian BJ, Barker RA, Robbins TW, Rowe JB - Biol. Psychiatry (2014)

Bottom Line: We therefore examined the effect of the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine on response inhibition in a stop-signal paradigm.The effects of disease and drug on behavioral performance, regional brain activity, and functional connectivity were analyzed using general linear models.Although there was no overall behavioral benefit from atomoxetine, analyses of individual differences revealed that enhanced response inhibition by atomoxetine was associated with increased RIFG activation and functional frontostriatal connectivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Control subjects showed greater stop-related (stop-signal [SS] > Go, warm colors) and NoGo-related activations (NoGo > Go, cool colors) in the right inferior frontal gyrus (RIFG). The stop-related RIFG activation was significantly weaker in Parkinson’s disease-placebo (PD-PLA) than in control subjects (disease effect, p < .05 small-volume corrected). Color scales indicate t values. Coordinates are in Montreal Neurological Institute space. (B) Atomoxetine selectively enhanced the stop-related RIFG activation in more advanced disease (drug × severity) and in older patients (drug × age). The atomoxetine-induced change of RIFG activity (∆Activity) was positively correlated with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and age (mean-corrected data).
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f0005: (A) Control subjects showed greater stop-related (stop-signal [SS] > Go, warm colors) and NoGo-related activations (NoGo > Go, cool colors) in the right inferior frontal gyrus (RIFG). The stop-related RIFG activation was significantly weaker in Parkinson’s disease-placebo (PD-PLA) than in control subjects (disease effect, p < .05 small-volume corrected). Color scales indicate t values. Coordinates are in Montreal Neurological Institute space. (B) Atomoxetine selectively enhanced the stop-related RIFG activation in more advanced disease (drug × severity) and in older patients (drug × age). The atomoxetine-induced change of RIFG activity (∆Activity) was positively correlated with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and age (mean-corrected data).

Mentions: Figure 1 presents inhibition-related activations, including the RIFG, in each group. Control subjects showed RIFG activations for SS > Go (peak coordinates in MNI space [54 18 8], t = 7.17, 1621 voxels) and for NoGo > Go (peak [48 18 −2], t = 6.00, 452 voxels; Figure 1A). The stop-related RIFG activation (SS > Go), not the NoGo-related activation (NoGo > Go), was significantly reduced in PD-placebo compared with control subjects (disease effect, peak [56 16 12], t = 3.88, 14 voxels; Figure 1A).


Improving response inhibition in Parkinson's disease with atomoxetine.

Ye Z, Altena E, Nombela C, Housden CR, Maxwell H, Rittman T, Huddleston C, Rae CL, Regenthal R, Sahakian BJ, Barker RA, Robbins TW, Rowe JB - Biol. Psychiatry (2014)

(A) Control subjects showed greater stop-related (stop-signal [SS] > Go, warm colors) and NoGo-related activations (NoGo > Go, cool colors) in the right inferior frontal gyrus (RIFG). The stop-related RIFG activation was significantly weaker in Parkinson’s disease-placebo (PD-PLA) than in control subjects (disease effect, p < .05 small-volume corrected). Color scales indicate t values. Coordinates are in Montreal Neurological Institute space. (B) Atomoxetine selectively enhanced the stop-related RIFG activation in more advanced disease (drug × severity) and in older patients (drug × age). The atomoxetine-induced change of RIFG activity (∆Activity) was positively correlated with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and age (mean-corrected data).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384955&req=5

f0005: (A) Control subjects showed greater stop-related (stop-signal [SS] > Go, warm colors) and NoGo-related activations (NoGo > Go, cool colors) in the right inferior frontal gyrus (RIFG). The stop-related RIFG activation was significantly weaker in Parkinson’s disease-placebo (PD-PLA) than in control subjects (disease effect, p < .05 small-volume corrected). Color scales indicate t values. Coordinates are in Montreal Neurological Institute space. (B) Atomoxetine selectively enhanced the stop-related RIFG activation in more advanced disease (drug × severity) and in older patients (drug × age). The atomoxetine-induced change of RIFG activity (∆Activity) was positively correlated with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and age (mean-corrected data).
Mentions: Figure 1 presents inhibition-related activations, including the RIFG, in each group. Control subjects showed RIFG activations for SS > Go (peak coordinates in MNI space [54 18 8], t = 7.17, 1621 voxels) and for NoGo > Go (peak [48 18 −2], t = 6.00, 452 voxels; Figure 1A). The stop-related RIFG activation (SS > Go), not the NoGo-related activation (NoGo > Go), was significantly reduced in PD-placebo compared with control subjects (disease effect, peak [56 16 12], t = 3.88, 14 voxels; Figure 1A).

Bottom Line: We therefore examined the effect of the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine on response inhibition in a stop-signal paradigm.The effects of disease and drug on behavioral performance, regional brain activity, and functional connectivity were analyzed using general linear models.Although there was no overall behavioral benefit from atomoxetine, analyses of individual differences revealed that enhanced response inhibition by atomoxetine was associated with increased RIFG activation and functional frontostriatal connectivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus