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Effect of grain size on thermal transport in post-annealed antimony telluride thin films.

Park NW, Lee WY, Hong JE, Park TH, Yoon SG, Im H, Kim HS, Lee SK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: The measured total thermal conductivities of 400-nm-thick thin films annealed at temperatures of 200°C, 250°C, 300°C, 320°C, and 350°C were determined to be 2.0 to 3.7 W/m · K in the 20 to 300 K temperature range.We found that the film grain size, rather than the strain, had the most prominent effect on the reduction of the total thermal conductivity.To confirm the effect of grain size on temperature-dependent thermal transport in the thin films, the experimental results were analyzed using a modified Callaway model approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 156-756 Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The effects of grain size and strain on the temperature-dependent thermal transport of antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) thin films, controlled using post-annealing temperatures of 200°C to 350°C, were investigated using the 3-omega method. The measured total thermal conductivities of 400-nm-thick thin films annealed at temperatures of 200°C, 250°C, 300°C, 320°C, and 350°C were determined to be 2.0 to 3.7 W/m · K in the 20 to 300 K temperature range. We found that the film grain size, rather than the strain, had the most prominent effect on the reduction of the total thermal conductivity. To confirm the effect of grain size on temperature-dependent thermal transport in the thin films, the experimental results were analyzed using a modified Callaway model approach.

No MeSH data available.


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XRD pattern, (1010) peak, and grain sizes and strains of Sb2T3thin films. (a) XRD pattern and (b) (1010) peak of Sb2T3 thin films with increasing annealing temperatures of up to 350°C. (c) and (d) Grain sizes and strains of Sb2Te3 thin films as a function of post-annealing temperatures of up to 350°C, respectively.
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Fig2: XRD pattern, (1010) peak, and grain sizes and strains of Sb2T3thin films. (a) XRD pattern and (b) (1010) peak of Sb2T3 thin films with increasing annealing temperatures of up to 350°C. (c) and (d) Grain sizes and strains of Sb2Te3 thin films as a function of post-annealing temperatures of up to 350°C, respectively.

Mentions: The XRD patterns of the annealed Sb2Te3 films are shown in Figure 2a,b. From Figure 2a, it is apparent that two clear diffraction peaks are located at 28.24° and 38.29°, which are corresponding to the diffraction reflections of the (015) and (1010) planes of the Sb2Te3 films, respectively. A rhombohedral structure (JCPDS No. 71-393, ) can be expected for the Sb2Te3 thin film, which is also consistent with the XRD patterns previously reported for Sb2Te3 films [16,26,32,33]. In addition, the XRD spectra show no further significant crystallinity changes when the annealing temperature is increased up to 350°C, as shown in Figure 2a, implying that the films obtained highly oriented crystalline structures under all annealing temperatures. The average grain size of the thin film was calculated using the Debye-Scherrer equation [34]Figure 2


Effect of grain size on thermal transport in post-annealed antimony telluride thin films.

Park NW, Lee WY, Hong JE, Park TH, Yoon SG, Im H, Kim HS, Lee SK - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

XRD pattern, (1010) peak, and grain sizes and strains of Sb2T3thin films. (a) XRD pattern and (b) (1010) peak of Sb2T3 thin films with increasing annealing temperatures of up to 350°C. (c) and (d) Grain sizes and strains of Sb2Te3 thin films as a function of post-annealing temperatures of up to 350°C, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384892&req=5

Fig2: XRD pattern, (1010) peak, and grain sizes and strains of Sb2T3thin films. (a) XRD pattern and (b) (1010) peak of Sb2T3 thin films with increasing annealing temperatures of up to 350°C. (c) and (d) Grain sizes and strains of Sb2Te3 thin films as a function of post-annealing temperatures of up to 350°C, respectively.
Mentions: The XRD patterns of the annealed Sb2Te3 films are shown in Figure 2a,b. From Figure 2a, it is apparent that two clear diffraction peaks are located at 28.24° and 38.29°, which are corresponding to the diffraction reflections of the (015) and (1010) planes of the Sb2Te3 films, respectively. A rhombohedral structure (JCPDS No. 71-393, ) can be expected for the Sb2Te3 thin film, which is also consistent with the XRD patterns previously reported for Sb2Te3 films [16,26,32,33]. In addition, the XRD spectra show no further significant crystallinity changes when the annealing temperature is increased up to 350°C, as shown in Figure 2a, implying that the films obtained highly oriented crystalline structures under all annealing temperatures. The average grain size of the thin film was calculated using the Debye-Scherrer equation [34]Figure 2

Bottom Line: The measured total thermal conductivities of 400-nm-thick thin films annealed at temperatures of 200°C, 250°C, 300°C, 320°C, and 350°C were determined to be 2.0 to 3.7 W/m · K in the 20 to 300 K temperature range.We found that the film grain size, rather than the strain, had the most prominent effect on the reduction of the total thermal conductivity.To confirm the effect of grain size on temperature-dependent thermal transport in the thin films, the experimental results were analyzed using a modified Callaway model approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 156-756 Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The effects of grain size and strain on the temperature-dependent thermal transport of antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) thin films, controlled using post-annealing temperatures of 200°C to 350°C, were investigated using the 3-omega method. The measured total thermal conductivities of 400-nm-thick thin films annealed at temperatures of 200°C, 250°C, 300°C, 320°C, and 350°C were determined to be 2.0 to 3.7 W/m · K in the 20 to 300 K temperature range. We found that the film grain size, rather than the strain, had the most prominent effect on the reduction of the total thermal conductivity. To confirm the effect of grain size on temperature-dependent thermal transport in the thin films, the experimental results were analyzed using a modified Callaway model approach.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus