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Impaired allocentric spatial processing in posttraumatic stress disorder.

Smith KV, Burgess N, Brewin CR, King JA - Neurobiol Learn Mem (2015)

Bottom Line: Groups performed comparably on egocentric memory and non-spatial memory for lists of objects.Exposure to repeated incident trauma was also associated with significantly worse spatial processing in the PTSD group.These findings have important clinical implications for cognitive therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, United Kingdom; Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Kirsten.smith@psy.ox.ac.uk.

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Performance on egocentric and allocentric spatial memory in the Town Square task, by group (∗P = .01).
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f0020: Performance on egocentric and allocentric spatial memory in the Town Square task, by group (∗P = .01).

Mentions: A 2 × 2 mixed factorial analysis showed a significant interaction of group and viewpoint [F(1, 55) = 6.68, p = .01, ηp2 = .11], reflecting the poorer performance by the PTSD group on the shifted-view compared to same-view spatial memory task (see Fig. 4). There was a main effect of viewpoint [F(1, 55) = 105.69, p < .001, ηp2 = .66], reflecting the poorer performance of both groups in the allocentric (i.e. shifted-view) condition. The main effect of group was also significant [F(1, 55) = 5.10, p = .03, ηp2 = .09] indicating that the PTSD group performed significantly worse than the no-PTSD group on overall spatial memory. Post hoc t-tests confirmed that groups did not differ on same-view spatial memory [t(55) = 1.48, p = .14] but the PTSD group displayed a selective impairment on shifted-view spatial memory [t(55) = 2.58, p = .01].


Impaired allocentric spatial processing in posttraumatic stress disorder.

Smith KV, Burgess N, Brewin CR, King JA - Neurobiol Learn Mem (2015)

Performance on egocentric and allocentric spatial memory in the Town Square task, by group (∗P = .01).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384783&req=5

f0020: Performance on egocentric and allocentric spatial memory in the Town Square task, by group (∗P = .01).
Mentions: A 2 × 2 mixed factorial analysis showed a significant interaction of group and viewpoint [F(1, 55) = 6.68, p = .01, ηp2 = .11], reflecting the poorer performance by the PTSD group on the shifted-view compared to same-view spatial memory task (see Fig. 4). There was a main effect of viewpoint [F(1, 55) = 105.69, p < .001, ηp2 = .66], reflecting the poorer performance of both groups in the allocentric (i.e. shifted-view) condition. The main effect of group was also significant [F(1, 55) = 5.10, p = .03, ηp2 = .09] indicating that the PTSD group performed significantly worse than the no-PTSD group on overall spatial memory. Post hoc t-tests confirmed that groups did not differ on same-view spatial memory [t(55) = 1.48, p = .14] but the PTSD group displayed a selective impairment on shifted-view spatial memory [t(55) = 2.58, p = .01].

Bottom Line: Groups performed comparably on egocentric memory and non-spatial memory for lists of objects.Exposure to repeated incident trauma was also associated with significantly worse spatial processing in the PTSD group.These findings have important clinical implications for cognitive therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, United Kingdom; Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Kirsten.smith@psy.ox.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus