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Impaired allocentric spatial processing in posttraumatic stress disorder.

Smith KV, Burgess N, Brewin CR, King JA - Neurobiol Learn Mem (2015)

Bottom Line: Groups performed comparably on egocentric memory and non-spatial memory for lists of objects.Exposure to repeated incident trauma was also associated with significantly worse spatial processing in the PTSD group.These findings have important clinical implications for cognitive therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, United Kingdom; Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Kirsten.smith@psy.ox.ac.uk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The Four Mountains Task. Left panel: a typical example of a stimulus image. Right panel: four forced-choice response items. Each shows a different arrangement of topography, one of which is the stimulus shown from a different position. The correct response is highlighted for clarity in this figure only.
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f0005: The Four Mountains Task. Left panel: a typical example of a stimulus image. Right panel: four forced-choice response items. Each shows a different arrangement of topography, one of which is the stimulus shown from a different position. The correct response is highlighted for clarity in this figure only.

Mentions: Participants are presented with a “sample” landscape image, and simultaneously with a four-alternative choice of landscape scenes arranged in a 2 by 2 grid on the facing page of the A4 test booklet (Fig. 1). All four alternative responses are rendered under the same weather and lighting conditions as each other, but with different conditions and viewpoint from the sample image. The task is to identify the target image that matches the topography of the sample image. Items were presented for a maximum of 60 s and participants were prompted for a response after 30 s. Responses correct are scored out of 15 items.


Impaired allocentric spatial processing in posttraumatic stress disorder.

Smith KV, Burgess N, Brewin CR, King JA - Neurobiol Learn Mem (2015)

The Four Mountains Task. Left panel: a typical example of a stimulus image. Right panel: four forced-choice response items. Each shows a different arrangement of topography, one of which is the stimulus shown from a different position. The correct response is highlighted for clarity in this figure only.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384783&req=5

f0005: The Four Mountains Task. Left panel: a typical example of a stimulus image. Right panel: four forced-choice response items. Each shows a different arrangement of topography, one of which is the stimulus shown from a different position. The correct response is highlighted for clarity in this figure only.
Mentions: Participants are presented with a “sample” landscape image, and simultaneously with a four-alternative choice of landscape scenes arranged in a 2 by 2 grid on the facing page of the A4 test booklet (Fig. 1). All four alternative responses are rendered under the same weather and lighting conditions as each other, but with different conditions and viewpoint from the sample image. The task is to identify the target image that matches the topography of the sample image. Items were presented for a maximum of 60 s and participants were prompted for a response after 30 s. Responses correct are scored out of 15 items.

Bottom Line: Groups performed comparably on egocentric memory and non-spatial memory for lists of objects.Exposure to repeated incident trauma was also associated with significantly worse spatial processing in the PTSD group.These findings have important clinical implications for cognitive therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, United Kingdom; Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Kirsten.smith@psy.ox.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus