Limits...
Revised adult immunization guideline recommended by the korean society of infectious diseases, 2014.

Choi WS, Choi JH, Kwon KT, Seo K, Kim MA, Lee SO, Hong YJ, Lee JS, Song JY, Bang JH, Choi HJ, Choi YH, Lee DG, Cheong HJ, Committee of Adult ImmunizationKorean Society of Infectious Diseas - Infect Chemother (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

This revision provides information about vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae; tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis; herpes zoster; human papillomavirus; influenza; meningococcus; Japanese encephalitis; and yellow fever... For vaccines against influenza, meningococcus, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever, the Committee on Adult Immunization has summarized its opinions on recent issues regarding the vaccines... Since 2006, the Committee had recommended that pregnant women without previous Tdap vaccine administration receive the vaccine right after pregnancy, as well as any family members or caregivers who would contact the newborn... However such a cocooning strategy did not turn out to be effective, and failed to protect newborns from being exposed to pertussis until the time when they received their first diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) for infants, two months after birth... Women are recommended to receive a dose of Tdap vaccine before pregnancy or right after delivery in the KSID's Tdap vaccine guidelines for pregnant women in its Adult Immunization 2 Edition... However, ZEST did not cover many cases in which herpes zoster was followed by postherpetic neuralgia, making it impossible to assess the vaccine's preventive effect against the condition... The KSID Committee on Adult Immunization officially evaluated the ZEST results and concluded that the study provides grounds that are as sound as the grounds suggested by the previous SPS... However, ZEST did not verify the vaccine's preventive effects against neuralgia following herpes zoster, and there are still controversies regarding long-term immunogenicity and revaccination with zoster vaccine... From these findings, WHO designated pregnant women as the most prioritized subjects of influenza vaccination and advised pregnant women to receive inactivated influenza vaccine regardless of gestation weeks... A study was conducted that evaluated the relationship between influenza vaccination and pregnancy in terms of the safety of the fetus... Influenza vaccination of a pregnant woman was safe and did not increase the risk of preterm delivery or low birth weight... However, the rate of influenza vaccination in pregnancy among Korean pregnant women is only 4 to 20.9%, substantially lower than the vaccination rate among the elderly and people with chronic medical conditions... Moreover, Japanese encephalitis vaccination is included in the NIP of Korea... While there are concerns over the safety of substrates used in producing a live-attenuated vaccine, WHO has concluded that it is safe and effective, and it was able to be included in the NIP.

No MeSH data available.


Recommendation on pneumococcal vaccine for Aduls 65 years of age or older with chronic medical conditions.PCV13, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine; PPV23, 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384453&req=5

Figure 1: Recommendation on pneumococcal vaccine for Aduls 65 years of age or older with chronic medical conditions.PCV13, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine; PPV23, 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine

Mentions: The Committee on Adult Immunization has stated that one of the PVC13 or PPV23 should be given for healthy adults aged 65 years and older. However, the Committee has recommended that adults in the same age group with chronic medical conditions should receive PCV13 first, followed by PPV23 6 to 12 months later, because these individuals have a high risk of severe pneumococcal disease caused by various serotypes. However, PCV13 and PPV23 should not be administered at the same time and there must be an interval of at least 8 weeks between the administrations (Fig. 1).


Revised adult immunization guideline recommended by the korean society of infectious diseases, 2014.

Choi WS, Choi JH, Kwon KT, Seo K, Kim MA, Lee SO, Hong YJ, Lee JS, Song JY, Bang JH, Choi HJ, Choi YH, Lee DG, Cheong HJ, Committee of Adult ImmunizationKorean Society of Infectious Diseas - Infect Chemother (2015)

Recommendation on pneumococcal vaccine for Aduls 65 years of age or older with chronic medical conditions.PCV13, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine; PPV23, 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384453&req=5

Figure 1: Recommendation on pneumococcal vaccine for Aduls 65 years of age or older with chronic medical conditions.PCV13, 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine; PPV23, 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine
Mentions: The Committee on Adult Immunization has stated that one of the PVC13 or PPV23 should be given for healthy adults aged 65 years and older. However, the Committee has recommended that adults in the same age group with chronic medical conditions should receive PCV13 first, followed by PPV23 6 to 12 months later, because these individuals have a high risk of severe pneumococcal disease caused by various serotypes. However, PCV13 and PPV23 should not be administered at the same time and there must be an interval of at least 8 weeks between the administrations (Fig. 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

This revision provides information about vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae; tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis; herpes zoster; human papillomavirus; influenza; meningococcus; Japanese encephalitis; and yellow fever... For vaccines against influenza, meningococcus, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever, the Committee on Adult Immunization has summarized its opinions on recent issues regarding the vaccines... Since 2006, the Committee had recommended that pregnant women without previous Tdap vaccine administration receive the vaccine right after pregnancy, as well as any family members or caregivers who would contact the newborn... However such a cocooning strategy did not turn out to be effective, and failed to protect newborns from being exposed to pertussis until the time when they received their first diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) for infants, two months after birth... Women are recommended to receive a dose of Tdap vaccine before pregnancy or right after delivery in the KSID's Tdap vaccine guidelines for pregnant women in its Adult Immunization 2 Edition... However, ZEST did not cover many cases in which herpes zoster was followed by postherpetic neuralgia, making it impossible to assess the vaccine's preventive effect against the condition... The KSID Committee on Adult Immunization officially evaluated the ZEST results and concluded that the study provides grounds that are as sound as the grounds suggested by the previous SPS... However, ZEST did not verify the vaccine's preventive effects against neuralgia following herpes zoster, and there are still controversies regarding long-term immunogenicity and revaccination with zoster vaccine... From these findings, WHO designated pregnant women as the most prioritized subjects of influenza vaccination and advised pregnant women to receive inactivated influenza vaccine regardless of gestation weeks... A study was conducted that evaluated the relationship between influenza vaccination and pregnancy in terms of the safety of the fetus... Influenza vaccination of a pregnant woman was safe and did not increase the risk of preterm delivery or low birth weight... However, the rate of influenza vaccination in pregnancy among Korean pregnant women is only 4 to 20.9%, substantially lower than the vaccination rate among the elderly and people with chronic medical conditions... Moreover, Japanese encephalitis vaccination is included in the NIP of Korea... While there are concerns over the safety of substrates used in producing a live-attenuated vaccine, WHO has concluded that it is safe and effective, and it was able to be included in the NIP.

No MeSH data available.