Limits...
Overspecialized and undertrained? Patient diversity encountered by medical students during their internal medicine clerkship at a university hospital.

Melderis S, Gutowski JP, Harendza S - BMC Med Educ (2015)

Bottom Line: The only subspecialty with no significant difference compared with on call was nephrology for diagnostic investigations.With respect to therapy, nephrology and infectious diseases showed no significant differences compared with on call.Shadowing the on call resident or shorter rotations could provide a more extended patient diversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: III. Medizinische Klinik, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. s.melderis@uke.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: During the four-month internal medicine clerkship in their final year, undergraduate medical students are closely involved in patient care. Little is known about what constitutes their typical learning experiences with respect to patient diversity within the different subspecialties of internal medicine and during on call hours.

Methods: 25 final year medical students (16 female, 9 male) on their internal medicine clerkship participated in this observational single-center study. To detail the patient diversity encountered by medical students at a university hospital during their 16-week internal medicine clerkship, all participants self-reported their patient contacts in the different subspecialties and during on call hours on patient encounter cards. Patients' chief complaint, suspected main diagnosis, planned diagnostic investigations, and therapy in seven different internal medicine subspecialties and the on call medicine service were documented.

Results: 496 PECs were analysed in total. The greatest diversity of chief complaints (CC) and suspected main diagnoses (SMD) was observed in patients encountered on call, with the combined frequencies of the three most common CCs or SMDs accounting for only 23% and 25%, respectively. Combined, the three most commonly encountered CC/SMD accounted for high percentages (82%/63%), i.e. less diversity, in oncology and low percentages (37%/32%), i.e. high diversity, in nephrology. The percentage of all diagnostic investigations and therapies that were classified as "basic" differed between the subspecialties from 82%/94% (on call) to 37%/50% (pulmonology/oncology). The only subspecialty with no significant difference compared with on call was nephrology for diagnostic investigations. With respect to therapy, nephrology and infectious diseases showed no significant differences compared with on call.

Conclusions: Internal medicine clerkships at a university hospital provide students with a very limited patient diversity in most internal medicine subspecialties. Shadowing the on call resident or shorter rotations could provide a more extended patient diversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study design: allocation of participants to the subspecialties and the on call “rotation”. Total number of PECs collected per subspecialty and during on call.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384319&req=5

Fig1: Study design: allocation of participants to the subspecialties and the on call “rotation”. Total number of PECs collected per subspecialty and during on call.

Mentions: We used an observational study design where the unit of observation was a single student-patient interaction, as documented by the PECs, and the unit of analysis was the combined data of all these interactions/PECs within the different subspecialties (Figure 1). For comparison of the different subspecialties, we grouped all PECs according to the subspecialties (cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, infectious diseases, nephrology, oncology/hematology, and pulmonology) to which the students were assigned. All PECs that were completed during on calls were grouped together and handled as a separate “subspecialty”.Figure 1


Overspecialized and undertrained? Patient diversity encountered by medical students during their internal medicine clerkship at a university hospital.

Melderis S, Gutowski JP, Harendza S - BMC Med Educ (2015)

Study design: allocation of participants to the subspecialties and the on call “rotation”. Total number of PECs collected per subspecialty and during on call.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384319&req=5

Fig1: Study design: allocation of participants to the subspecialties and the on call “rotation”. Total number of PECs collected per subspecialty and during on call.
Mentions: We used an observational study design where the unit of observation was a single student-patient interaction, as documented by the PECs, and the unit of analysis was the combined data of all these interactions/PECs within the different subspecialties (Figure 1). For comparison of the different subspecialties, we grouped all PECs according to the subspecialties (cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, infectious diseases, nephrology, oncology/hematology, and pulmonology) to which the students were assigned. All PECs that were completed during on calls were grouped together and handled as a separate “subspecialty”.Figure 1

Bottom Line: The only subspecialty with no significant difference compared with on call was nephrology for diagnostic investigations.With respect to therapy, nephrology and infectious diseases showed no significant differences compared with on call.Shadowing the on call resident or shorter rotations could provide a more extended patient diversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: III. Medizinische Klinik, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. s.melderis@uke.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: During the four-month internal medicine clerkship in their final year, undergraduate medical students are closely involved in patient care. Little is known about what constitutes their typical learning experiences with respect to patient diversity within the different subspecialties of internal medicine and during on call hours.

Methods: 25 final year medical students (16 female, 9 male) on their internal medicine clerkship participated in this observational single-center study. To detail the patient diversity encountered by medical students at a university hospital during their 16-week internal medicine clerkship, all participants self-reported their patient contacts in the different subspecialties and during on call hours on patient encounter cards. Patients' chief complaint, suspected main diagnosis, planned diagnostic investigations, and therapy in seven different internal medicine subspecialties and the on call medicine service were documented.

Results: 496 PECs were analysed in total. The greatest diversity of chief complaints (CC) and suspected main diagnoses (SMD) was observed in patients encountered on call, with the combined frequencies of the three most common CCs or SMDs accounting for only 23% and 25%, respectively. Combined, the three most commonly encountered CC/SMD accounted for high percentages (82%/63%), i.e. less diversity, in oncology and low percentages (37%/32%), i.e. high diversity, in nephrology. The percentage of all diagnostic investigations and therapies that were classified as "basic" differed between the subspecialties from 82%/94% (on call) to 37%/50% (pulmonology/oncology). The only subspecialty with no significant difference compared with on call was nephrology for diagnostic investigations. With respect to therapy, nephrology and infectious diseases showed no significant differences compared with on call.

Conclusions: Internal medicine clerkships at a university hospital provide students with a very limited patient diversity in most internal medicine subspecialties. Shadowing the on call resident or shorter rotations could provide a more extended patient diversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus