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Total Hip Prostheses in Standing, Sitting and Squatting Positions: An Overview of Our 8 Years Practice Using the EOS Imaging Technology.

Lazennec JY, Rousseau MA, Brusson A, Folinais D, Amel M, Clarke I, Pour AE - Open Orthop J (2015)

Bottom Line: More total hip arthroplasty (THA) is performed worldwide and especially in younger and more active patients compared to earlier decades.Our results will be compared and confronted with the actual literature about this innovative technology.We shall especially emphasize our experience about patients with abnormal posture and the evolution of the subject over time, because the phenomenon of an aging spine is frequently associated with the process of aging hips.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Pitié-Salpétrière Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, UPMC, 47-83 Boulevard de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France ; BiomechanicsLab (LBM), Arts et Metiers Paris-Tech, Paris, France ; Department of Anatomy, UPMC, 105 Boulevard de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
More total hip arthroplasty (THA) is performed worldwide and especially in younger and more active patients compared to earlier decades. One of the focuses of THA research in the future will be on optimizing the radiological follow-up of these patients using 2D and 3D measurements of implants position while reducing the radiation dose delivered. Low-dose EOS(®) imaging is an innovative slot-scanning radiograph system providing valuable information in patient functional positions (standing, sitting and even squatting positions). EOS has been proven accurate and reliable without significant inconvenience caused by the metallic artifacts of implants. The ability to obtain precise data on implant orientation according to the patient posture opens new perspectives for a comprehensive analysis of the pelvic frontal and sagittal balance and its potential impact on implants function and failures. We report our 8 years experience on our first 300 THA patients using this technology routinely for pre and post op evaluation. Our results will be compared and confronted with the actual literature about this innovative technology. We shall especially emphasize our experience about patients with abnormal posture and the evolution of the subject over time, because the phenomenon of an aging spine is frequently associated with the process of aging hips.

No MeSH data available.


Comparison in standing and sitting positions for Frontal Acetabular Inclination angles (FAIA) on AP views and Sagittal AcetabularInclination angles (SAIA) on lateral views.
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Figure 6: Comparison in standing and sitting positions for Frontal Acetabular Inclination angles (FAIA) on AP views and Sagittal AcetabularInclination angles (SAIA) on lateral views.

Mentions: Three key parameters are considered for acetabular evaluation: frontal and sagittal inclination and acetabular anteversion. These parameters can be considered in two ways: as “morphological parameters” with reference to the bone frame of the pelvis as described by Murray in the lying position [25], and in relation to the “functional orientation” of the pelvis inducing significant variations in acetabular orientation and the values of these parameters in THA implantation for standing, sitting, squatting or pelvic rotation. In our current practice, we mainly use the “functional“ point of view, as the orientation of the body (and therefore the acetabular cup) significantly changes with functional position when comparing supine, standing and sitting postures as highlighted by the EOS imaging system. Whatever the position, the reference plane remains the horizontal transverse plane for all the measurements. The EOS imaging system provides 2D and 3D information regarding the acetabular orientation, but to date, we mainly use the 2D measures as they represented a good transition from our previous use of classical plane radiographs (Fig. 6).


Total Hip Prostheses in Standing, Sitting and Squatting Positions: An Overview of Our 8 Years Practice Using the EOS Imaging Technology.

Lazennec JY, Rousseau MA, Brusson A, Folinais D, Amel M, Clarke I, Pour AE - Open Orthop J (2015)

Comparison in standing and sitting positions for Frontal Acetabular Inclination angles (FAIA) on AP views and Sagittal AcetabularInclination angles (SAIA) on lateral views.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384273&req=5

Figure 6: Comparison in standing and sitting positions for Frontal Acetabular Inclination angles (FAIA) on AP views and Sagittal AcetabularInclination angles (SAIA) on lateral views.
Mentions: Three key parameters are considered for acetabular evaluation: frontal and sagittal inclination and acetabular anteversion. These parameters can be considered in two ways: as “morphological parameters” with reference to the bone frame of the pelvis as described by Murray in the lying position [25], and in relation to the “functional orientation” of the pelvis inducing significant variations in acetabular orientation and the values of these parameters in THA implantation for standing, sitting, squatting or pelvic rotation. In our current practice, we mainly use the “functional“ point of view, as the orientation of the body (and therefore the acetabular cup) significantly changes with functional position when comparing supine, standing and sitting postures as highlighted by the EOS imaging system. Whatever the position, the reference plane remains the horizontal transverse plane for all the measurements. The EOS imaging system provides 2D and 3D information regarding the acetabular orientation, but to date, we mainly use the 2D measures as they represented a good transition from our previous use of classical plane radiographs (Fig. 6).

Bottom Line: More total hip arthroplasty (THA) is performed worldwide and especially in younger and more active patients compared to earlier decades.Our results will be compared and confronted with the actual literature about this innovative technology.We shall especially emphasize our experience about patients with abnormal posture and the evolution of the subject over time, because the phenomenon of an aging spine is frequently associated with the process of aging hips.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Pitié-Salpétrière Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, UPMC, 47-83 Boulevard de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France ; BiomechanicsLab (LBM), Arts et Metiers Paris-Tech, Paris, France ; Department of Anatomy, UPMC, 105 Boulevard de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
More total hip arthroplasty (THA) is performed worldwide and especially in younger and more active patients compared to earlier decades. One of the focuses of THA research in the future will be on optimizing the radiological follow-up of these patients using 2D and 3D measurements of implants position while reducing the radiation dose delivered. Low-dose EOS(®) imaging is an innovative slot-scanning radiograph system providing valuable information in patient functional positions (standing, sitting and even squatting positions). EOS has been proven accurate and reliable without significant inconvenience caused by the metallic artifacts of implants. The ability to obtain precise data on implant orientation according to the patient posture opens new perspectives for a comprehensive analysis of the pelvic frontal and sagittal balance and its potential impact on implants function and failures. We report our 8 years experience on our first 300 THA patients using this technology routinely for pre and post op evaluation. Our results will be compared and confronted with the actual literature about this innovative technology. We shall especially emphasize our experience about patients with abnormal posture and the evolution of the subject over time, because the phenomenon of an aging spine is frequently associated with the process of aging hips.

No MeSH data available.