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Total Hip Prostheses in Standing, Sitting and Squatting Positions: An Overview of Our 8 Years Practice Using the EOS Imaging Technology.

Lazennec JY, Rousseau MA, Brusson A, Folinais D, Amel M, Clarke I, Pour AE - Open Orthop J (2015)

Bottom Line: More total hip arthroplasty (THA) is performed worldwide and especially in younger and more active patients compared to earlier decades.Our results will be compared and confronted with the actual literature about this innovative technology.We shall especially emphasize our experience about patients with abnormal posture and the evolution of the subject over time, because the phenomenon of an aging spine is frequently associated with the process of aging hips.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Pitié-Salpétrière Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, UPMC, 47-83 Boulevard de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France ; BiomechanicsLab (LBM), Arts et Metiers Paris-Tech, Paris, France ; Department of Anatomy, UPMC, 105 Boulevard de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
More total hip arthroplasty (THA) is performed worldwide and especially in younger and more active patients compared to earlier decades. One of the focuses of THA research in the future will be on optimizing the radiological follow-up of these patients using 2D and 3D measurements of implants position while reducing the radiation dose delivered. Low-dose EOS(®) imaging is an innovative slot-scanning radiograph system providing valuable information in patient functional positions (standing, sitting and even squatting positions). EOS has been proven accurate and reliable without significant inconvenience caused by the metallic artifacts of implants. The ability to obtain precise data on implant orientation according to the patient posture opens new perspectives for a comprehensive analysis of the pelvic frontal and sagittal balance and its potential impact on implants function and failures. We report our 8 years experience on our first 300 THA patients using this technology routinely for pre and post op evaluation. Our results will be compared and confronted with the actual literature about this innovative technology. We shall especially emphasize our experience about patients with abnormal posture and the evolution of the subject over time, because the phenomenon of an aging spine is frequently associated with the process of aging hips.

No MeSH data available.


A fused lumbo-sacral junction can induce impingement as the pelvis remains with the same tilt in standing and sitting position: themain adjustment parameter is the hips range of motion. These 2 patients are standing as in a sitting position (posterior pelvic tilt or pelvicextension).
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Figure 11: A fused lumbo-sacral junction can induce impingement as the pelvis remains with the same tilt in standing and sitting position: themain adjustment parameter is the hips range of motion. These 2 patients are standing as in a sitting position (posterior pelvic tilt or pelvicextension).

Mentions: The lack of variation in PT between the standing and sitting positions (less then 5°) has been observed in 87 cases; it represents a loss of adaptability for the anterior acetabular opening, and the patient may have the same acetabular orientation in both sitting and standing positions (patient appears to stand in a "sitting posture"), which may induce posterior impingement. On the contrary, a fixed or stiff lumbo-sacral junction can induce an anterior impingement in the sitting position, as the standing posture of the pelvis remains with a specific forward pelvic tilt ( pelvic anterior rotation or pelvis flexion): we observed this situation more rarely (6 cases) (Figs. 10, 11).


Total Hip Prostheses in Standing, Sitting and Squatting Positions: An Overview of Our 8 Years Practice Using the EOS Imaging Technology.

Lazennec JY, Rousseau MA, Brusson A, Folinais D, Amel M, Clarke I, Pour AE - Open Orthop J (2015)

A fused lumbo-sacral junction can induce impingement as the pelvis remains with the same tilt in standing and sitting position: themain adjustment parameter is the hips range of motion. These 2 patients are standing as in a sitting position (posterior pelvic tilt or pelvicextension).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384273&req=5

Figure 11: A fused lumbo-sacral junction can induce impingement as the pelvis remains with the same tilt in standing and sitting position: themain adjustment parameter is the hips range of motion. These 2 patients are standing as in a sitting position (posterior pelvic tilt or pelvicextension).
Mentions: The lack of variation in PT between the standing and sitting positions (less then 5°) has been observed in 87 cases; it represents a loss of adaptability for the anterior acetabular opening, and the patient may have the same acetabular orientation in both sitting and standing positions (patient appears to stand in a "sitting posture"), which may induce posterior impingement. On the contrary, a fixed or stiff lumbo-sacral junction can induce an anterior impingement in the sitting position, as the standing posture of the pelvis remains with a specific forward pelvic tilt ( pelvic anterior rotation or pelvis flexion): we observed this situation more rarely (6 cases) (Figs. 10, 11).

Bottom Line: More total hip arthroplasty (THA) is performed worldwide and especially in younger and more active patients compared to earlier decades.Our results will be compared and confronted with the actual literature about this innovative technology.We shall especially emphasize our experience about patients with abnormal posture and the evolution of the subject over time, because the phenomenon of an aging spine is frequently associated with the process of aging hips.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Pitié-Salpétrière Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, UPMC, 47-83 Boulevard de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France ; BiomechanicsLab (LBM), Arts et Metiers Paris-Tech, Paris, France ; Department of Anatomy, UPMC, 105 Boulevard de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
More total hip arthroplasty (THA) is performed worldwide and especially in younger and more active patients compared to earlier decades. One of the focuses of THA research in the future will be on optimizing the radiological follow-up of these patients using 2D and 3D measurements of implants position while reducing the radiation dose delivered. Low-dose EOS(®) imaging is an innovative slot-scanning radiograph system providing valuable information in patient functional positions (standing, sitting and even squatting positions). EOS has been proven accurate and reliable without significant inconvenience caused by the metallic artifacts of implants. The ability to obtain precise data on implant orientation according to the patient posture opens new perspectives for a comprehensive analysis of the pelvic frontal and sagittal balance and its potential impact on implants function and failures. We report our 8 years experience on our first 300 THA patients using this technology routinely for pre and post op evaluation. Our results will be compared and confronted with the actual literature about this innovative technology. We shall especially emphasize our experience about patients with abnormal posture and the evolution of the subject over time, because the phenomenon of an aging spine is frequently associated with the process of aging hips.

No MeSH data available.