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Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

Singha B, Gatla HR, Vancurova I - Biomolecules (2015)

Bottom Line: The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis.The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation.We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, St. John's University, 8000 Utopia Parkway, New York, NY 11439, USA. bipradeb.singha10@my.stjohns.edu.

ABSTRACT
The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies.

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Schematic illustration of human CXCL1 promoter.
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biomolecules-05-00223-f002: Schematic illustration of human CXCL1 promoter.

Mentions: CXCL1 (GRO-α) contributes to ovarian cancer progression by inducing endothelial and epithelial cell proliferation and migration [25,26]. The putative transcription factor binding sites identified in human CXCL1 promoter are listed in Table 3. Experimental studies have demonstrated binding of the transcription factors p65 NFκB, AP-2, CCAAT displacement protein (CDP), and the stimulating protein-1 (SP-1) to the CXCL1 promoter in human cells (Figure 2). In ovarian cancer cells, though, the CXCL1 gene expression was found to be regulated mainly by NFκB pathway, specifically by the p65 DNA binding [25,27,28,111,112].


Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

Singha B, Gatla HR, Vancurova I - Biomolecules (2015)

Schematic illustration of human CXCL1 promoter.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384120&req=5

biomolecules-05-00223-f002: Schematic illustration of human CXCL1 promoter.
Mentions: CXCL1 (GRO-α) contributes to ovarian cancer progression by inducing endothelial and epithelial cell proliferation and migration [25,26]. The putative transcription factor binding sites identified in human CXCL1 promoter are listed in Table 3. Experimental studies have demonstrated binding of the transcription factors p65 NFκB, AP-2, CCAAT displacement protein (CDP), and the stimulating protein-1 (SP-1) to the CXCL1 promoter in human cells (Figure 2). In ovarian cancer cells, though, the CXCL1 gene expression was found to be regulated mainly by NFκB pathway, specifically by the p65 DNA binding [25,27,28,111,112].

Bottom Line: The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis.The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation.We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, St. John's University, 8000 Utopia Parkway, New York, NY 11439, USA. bipradeb.singha10@my.stjohns.edu.

ABSTRACT
The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus