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Modulation of the tumor microenvironment for cancer treatment: a biomaterials approach.

Adjei IM, Blanka S - J Funct Biomater (2015)

Bottom Line: Increasingly, there is evidence to suggest that these non-neoplastic cell components support cancer initiation, progression and metastasis and that their ablation or reprogramming can inhibit tumor growth.Our understanding of the activities of different parts of the tumor stroma in advancing cancer has been improved by the use of scaffold and matrix-based 3D systems originally developed for regenerative medicine.We also discuss how different drug delivery systems aid in the reprogramming of tumor stroma for cancer treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. adjeii@ufl.edu.

ABSTRACT
Tumors are complex tissues that consist of stromal cells, such as fibroblasts, immune cells and mesenchymal stem cells, as well as non-cellular components, in addition to neoplastic cells. Increasingly, there is evidence to suggest that these non-neoplastic cell components support cancer initiation, progression and metastasis and that their ablation or reprogramming can inhibit tumor growth. Our understanding of the activities of different parts of the tumor stroma in advancing cancer has been improved by the use of scaffold and matrix-based 3D systems originally developed for regenerative medicine. Additionally, drug delivery systems made from synthetic and natural biomaterials deliver drugs to kill stromal cells or reprogram the microenvironment for tumor inhibition. In this article, we review the impact of 3D tumor models in increasing our understanding of tumorigenesis. We also discuss how different drug delivery systems aid in the reprogramming of tumor stroma for cancer treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of the strategies for modulating tumor stroma for therapy. NPs injected intravenously can interact with blood vessel endothelium (1) or extravasate into the tumor stroma through the leaky tumor vasculature and bind to the ECM (2). For other applications, MSC tropism towards tumor can be used to modify the tumor stroma or induce apoptosis in cancer cells (3). MSC can be loaded with NPs that are released within tumors (4) or transformed to secrete proteins that inhibit tumor growth (5).
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jfb-06-00081-f002: Illustration of the strategies for modulating tumor stroma for therapy. NPs injected intravenously can interact with blood vessel endothelium (1) or extravasate into the tumor stroma through the leaky tumor vasculature and bind to the ECM (2). For other applications, MSC tropism towards tumor can be used to modify the tumor stroma or induce apoptosis in cancer cells (3). MSC can be loaded with NPs that are released within tumors (4) or transformed to secrete proteins that inhibit tumor growth (5).

Mentions: In addition to targeting therapeutics to tumors, most drug delivery systems provide stability, controlled release within the therapeutic window of drugs/biologics and decrease toxicity [7]. In addition to drug delivery systems, the tropism of MSCs to tumors is being leveraged to modulate the stroma and for drug delivery (Figure 2).


Modulation of the tumor microenvironment for cancer treatment: a biomaterials approach.

Adjei IM, Blanka S - J Funct Biomater (2015)

Illustration of the strategies for modulating tumor stroma for therapy. NPs injected intravenously can interact with blood vessel endothelium (1) or extravasate into the tumor stroma through the leaky tumor vasculature and bind to the ECM (2). For other applications, MSC tropism towards tumor can be used to modify the tumor stroma or induce apoptosis in cancer cells (3). MSC can be loaded with NPs that are released within tumors (4) or transformed to secrete proteins that inhibit tumor growth (5).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384103&req=5

jfb-06-00081-f002: Illustration of the strategies for modulating tumor stroma for therapy. NPs injected intravenously can interact with blood vessel endothelium (1) or extravasate into the tumor stroma through the leaky tumor vasculature and bind to the ECM (2). For other applications, MSC tropism towards tumor can be used to modify the tumor stroma or induce apoptosis in cancer cells (3). MSC can be loaded with NPs that are released within tumors (4) or transformed to secrete proteins that inhibit tumor growth (5).
Mentions: In addition to targeting therapeutics to tumors, most drug delivery systems provide stability, controlled release within the therapeutic window of drugs/biologics and decrease toxicity [7]. In addition to drug delivery systems, the tropism of MSCs to tumors is being leveraged to modulate the stroma and for drug delivery (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Increasingly, there is evidence to suggest that these non-neoplastic cell components support cancer initiation, progression and metastasis and that their ablation or reprogramming can inhibit tumor growth.Our understanding of the activities of different parts of the tumor stroma in advancing cancer has been improved by the use of scaffold and matrix-based 3D systems originally developed for regenerative medicine.We also discuss how different drug delivery systems aid in the reprogramming of tumor stroma for cancer treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. adjeii@ufl.edu.

ABSTRACT
Tumors are complex tissues that consist of stromal cells, such as fibroblasts, immune cells and mesenchymal stem cells, as well as non-cellular components, in addition to neoplastic cells. Increasingly, there is evidence to suggest that these non-neoplastic cell components support cancer initiation, progression and metastasis and that their ablation or reprogramming can inhibit tumor growth. Our understanding of the activities of different parts of the tumor stroma in advancing cancer has been improved by the use of scaffold and matrix-based 3D systems originally developed for regenerative medicine. Additionally, drug delivery systems made from synthetic and natural biomaterials deliver drugs to kill stromal cells or reprogram the microenvironment for tumor inhibition. In this article, we review the impact of 3D tumor models in increasing our understanding of tumorigenesis. We also discuss how different drug delivery systems aid in the reprogramming of tumor stroma for cancer treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus