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Characteristics of PVDF Membranes Irradiated by Electron Beam.

Jaleh B, Gavary N, Fakhri P, Muensit N, Taheri SM - Membranes (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: The surface hydrophilicity of the modified membrane was characterized by water contact angle measurement.The contact angle decreased compared to the original angle, indicating an improvement of surface hydrophilicity.Filtration results also showed that the pure water flux (PWF) of the modified membrane was lower than that of the unirradiated membrane.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan 65174, Iran. jaleh@basu.ac.ir.

ABSTRACT
Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes were exposed vertically to a high energy electron beam (EB) in air, at room temperature. The chemical changes were examined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The surface morphologies were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and showed some changes in the pore size. Thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis represented an increase in the thermal stability of PVDF due to irradiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) showed the presence of free radicals in the irradiated PVDF. The effect of EB irradiation on the electrical properties of the membranes was analyzed in order to determine the dielectric constant, and an increase in the dielectric constant was found on increasing the dose. The surface hydrophilicity of the modified membrane was characterized by water contact angle measurement. The contact angle decreased compared to the original angle, indicating an improvement of surface hydrophilicity. Filtration results also showed that the pure water flux (PWF) of the modified membrane was lower than that of the unirradiated membrane.

No MeSH data available.


Dielectric constant vs. frequency of unirradiated and irradiated PVDF membranes by 100 kGy, 150 kGy and 300 kGy.
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membranes-05-00001-f005: Dielectric constant vs. frequency of unirradiated and irradiated PVDF membranes by 100 kGy, 150 kGy and 300 kGy.

Mentions: The dielectric constant is a measure of the ability of a material to store electrical energy. Figure 5 displays the dielectric constant vs. frequency for irradiated and unirradiated membranes. It is clear from Figure 5 that irradiation leads to a gradual increase of dielectric constant as the amount of dose is increased. The increased dielectric constant at higher doses is related to a decrease in membrane void volume. Whereas air has a low dielectric constant, by reduction of void volume, the air content inside samples decreases resulting in an increase in the dielectric constant [18]. On the contrary Hui-Jian Ye et al. observed that the dielectric constant of PVDF film decreased by increasing the EB dose since the samples they used were films rather than membranes [12].


Characteristics of PVDF Membranes Irradiated by Electron Beam.

Jaleh B, Gavary N, Fakhri P, Muensit N, Taheri SM - Membranes (Basel) (2015)

Dielectric constant vs. frequency of unirradiated and irradiated PVDF membranes by 100 kGy, 150 kGy and 300 kGy.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384087&req=5

membranes-05-00001-f005: Dielectric constant vs. frequency of unirradiated and irradiated PVDF membranes by 100 kGy, 150 kGy and 300 kGy.
Mentions: The dielectric constant is a measure of the ability of a material to store electrical energy. Figure 5 displays the dielectric constant vs. frequency for irradiated and unirradiated membranes. It is clear from Figure 5 that irradiation leads to a gradual increase of dielectric constant as the amount of dose is increased. The increased dielectric constant at higher doses is related to a decrease in membrane void volume. Whereas air has a low dielectric constant, by reduction of void volume, the air content inside samples decreases resulting in an increase in the dielectric constant [18]. On the contrary Hui-Jian Ye et al. observed that the dielectric constant of PVDF film decreased by increasing the EB dose since the samples they used were films rather than membranes [12].

Bottom Line: The surface hydrophilicity of the modified membrane was characterized by water contact angle measurement.The contact angle decreased compared to the original angle, indicating an improvement of surface hydrophilicity.Filtration results also showed that the pure water flux (PWF) of the modified membrane was lower than that of the unirradiated membrane.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan 65174, Iran. jaleh@basu.ac.ir.

ABSTRACT
Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes were exposed vertically to a high energy electron beam (EB) in air, at room temperature. The chemical changes were examined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The surface morphologies were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and showed some changes in the pore size. Thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis represented an increase in the thermal stability of PVDF due to irradiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) showed the presence of free radicals in the irradiated PVDF. The effect of EB irradiation on the electrical properties of the membranes was analyzed in order to determine the dielectric constant, and an increase in the dielectric constant was found on increasing the dose. The surface hydrophilicity of the modified membrane was characterized by water contact angle measurement. The contact angle decreased compared to the original angle, indicating an improvement of surface hydrophilicity. Filtration results also showed that the pure water flux (PWF) of the modified membrane was lower than that of the unirradiated membrane.

No MeSH data available.