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Aetiology of Acute Lower Respiratory Infections among Children Under Five Years in Accra, Ghana.

Adiku TK, Asmah RH, Rodrigues O, Goka B, Obodai E, Adjei AA, Donkor ES, Armah G - Pathogens (2015)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of septicaemia was 10% and bacteria isolated were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and enteric bacteria, including Salmonella spp., Enterobacter spp and Klebsiella spp, were isolated.Out of the 108 cases, 18% tested positive for RSV, with two cases having RSV as the only aetiological pathogen detected.The subtyping analysis of RSV strains by a multiplex RT-PCR showed that subgroups A and B circulated in the season of analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, University of Ghana Medical School, Accra, Ghana. tkeadiku20@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The study aimed to investigate the aetiological agents and clinical presentations associated with acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) among children under five years old at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana. This was a cross-sectional study carried from February to December 2001. Nasopharyngeal aspirates and venous blood specimens obtained from 108 children with features suggestive of ALRI, were cultured and the isolated bacterial organisms were identified biochemically. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were also tested for Respiratory Syncitial Virus (RSV) antigen using a commercial kit (Becton Dickinson Directigen RSV test kit). A multiplex reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was also used to detect and characterize RSV using extracted RNA. Socio-demographic and clinical data were also obtained from the study subjects. Bronchopneumonia (55.5%), bronchiolitis (25%), lobar pneumonia (10.2), non-specific ALRI (4.6%), TB, bronchitis and respiratory distress (0.67%) were diagnosed. The prevalence of septicaemia was 10% and bacteria isolated were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and enteric bacteria, including Salmonella spp., Enterobacter spp and Klebsiella spp, were isolated. Out of the 108 cases, 18% tested positive for RSV, with two cases having RSV as the only aetiological pathogen detected. The subtyping analysis of RSV strains by a multiplex RT-PCR showed that subgroups A and B circulated in the season of analysis.

No MeSH data available.


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Clinical diagnosis of children with acute lower respiratory infections.
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pathogens-04-00022-f002: Clinical diagnosis of children with acute lower respiratory infections.

Mentions: Overall, eight fatal outcomes were reported and were associated with several clinical diagnosis including meningitis, septicaemia, HIV infection and gastroenteritis. The overall prevalence of RSV infection amongst ALRI patients was 18%. The most frequent symptoms were cough (95.4%), difficulty in breathing (89.8%), fever (83.3%) and diarrhea (25.9%) (Table 3). The most frequent causes of hospitalization of RSV patients were bronchopneumonia, bronchiolitis, pneumonia and respiratory distress (Figure 2). Generally, there were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between children who had RSV infection and other those who had other ALRI. The monthly distribution of ALRI and RSV cases are reported in Figure 3. ALRI cases occurred non-uniformly throughout the 11 months study (February to December) and peaked in July at 23 cases. RSV cases peaked in February and March (nine cases) after which it declined with no reported cases from May.


Aetiology of Acute Lower Respiratory Infections among Children Under Five Years in Accra, Ghana.

Adiku TK, Asmah RH, Rodrigues O, Goka B, Obodai E, Adjei AA, Donkor ES, Armah G - Pathogens (2015)

Clinical diagnosis of children with acute lower respiratory infections.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384070&req=5

pathogens-04-00022-f002: Clinical diagnosis of children with acute lower respiratory infections.
Mentions: Overall, eight fatal outcomes were reported and were associated with several clinical diagnosis including meningitis, septicaemia, HIV infection and gastroenteritis. The overall prevalence of RSV infection amongst ALRI patients was 18%. The most frequent symptoms were cough (95.4%), difficulty in breathing (89.8%), fever (83.3%) and diarrhea (25.9%) (Table 3). The most frequent causes of hospitalization of RSV patients were bronchopneumonia, bronchiolitis, pneumonia and respiratory distress (Figure 2). Generally, there were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between children who had RSV infection and other those who had other ALRI. The monthly distribution of ALRI and RSV cases are reported in Figure 3. ALRI cases occurred non-uniformly throughout the 11 months study (February to December) and peaked in July at 23 cases. RSV cases peaked in February and March (nine cases) after which it declined with no reported cases from May.

Bottom Line: The prevalence of septicaemia was 10% and bacteria isolated were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and enteric bacteria, including Salmonella spp., Enterobacter spp and Klebsiella spp, were isolated.Out of the 108 cases, 18% tested positive for RSV, with two cases having RSV as the only aetiological pathogen detected.The subtyping analysis of RSV strains by a multiplex RT-PCR showed that subgroups A and B circulated in the season of analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, University of Ghana Medical School, Accra, Ghana. tkeadiku20@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The study aimed to investigate the aetiological agents and clinical presentations associated with acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) among children under five years old at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana. This was a cross-sectional study carried from February to December 2001. Nasopharyngeal aspirates and venous blood specimens obtained from 108 children with features suggestive of ALRI, were cultured and the isolated bacterial organisms were identified biochemically. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were also tested for Respiratory Syncitial Virus (RSV) antigen using a commercial kit (Becton Dickinson Directigen RSV test kit). A multiplex reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was also used to detect and characterize RSV using extracted RNA. Socio-demographic and clinical data were also obtained from the study subjects. Bronchopneumonia (55.5%), bronchiolitis (25%), lobar pneumonia (10.2), non-specific ALRI (4.6%), TB, bronchitis and respiratory distress (0.67%) were diagnosed. The prevalence of septicaemia was 10% and bacteria isolated were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and enteric bacteria, including Salmonella spp., Enterobacter spp and Klebsiella spp, were isolated. Out of the 108 cases, 18% tested positive for RSV, with two cases having RSV as the only aetiological pathogen detected. The subtyping analysis of RSV strains by a multiplex RT-PCR showed that subgroups A and B circulated in the season of analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus