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Public trust in health information sharing: implications for biobanking and electronic health record systems.

Platt J, Kardia S - J Pers Med (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that seeing one's primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust.As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust.We conclude that, in order to assure the public's trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Management and Policy, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. jeplatt@umich.edu.

ABSTRACT
Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon's MTurk system (n = 447). We found that seeing one's primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public's trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making.

No MeSH data available.


Conceptual Model.
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jpm-05-00003-f001: Conceptual Model.

Mentions: To guide our investigation of the factors underlying the public’s trust in health information systems we created a conceptual model (Figure 1) representing six arenas anticipated to influence System Trust. Briefly, this model extends current research (reviewed below) on trust in the health system by measuring trust at the individual and system levels, examining four key dimensions of trust: Fidelity, competency, integrity, and global trust. It evaluates the relationship between trust in the health system and: (1) knowledge of health information sharing; (2) experience with the health system; (3) attitudes and beliefs about privacy; (4) expectations of benefit; (5) psychosocial factors; and (6) demographic characteristics.


Public trust in health information sharing: implications for biobanking and electronic health record systems.

Platt J, Kardia S - J Pers Med (2015)

Conceptual Model.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384055&req=5

jpm-05-00003-f001: Conceptual Model.
Mentions: To guide our investigation of the factors underlying the public’s trust in health information systems we created a conceptual model (Figure 1) representing six arenas anticipated to influence System Trust. Briefly, this model extends current research (reviewed below) on trust in the health system by measuring trust at the individual and system levels, examining four key dimensions of trust: Fidelity, competency, integrity, and global trust. It evaluates the relationship between trust in the health system and: (1) knowledge of health information sharing; (2) experience with the health system; (3) attitudes and beliefs about privacy; (4) expectations of benefit; (5) psychosocial factors; and (6) demographic characteristics.

Bottom Line: We found that seeing one's primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust.As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust.We conclude that, in order to assure the public's trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Management and Policy, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. jeplatt@umich.edu.

ABSTRACT
Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon's MTurk system (n = 447). We found that seeing one's primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public's trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making.

No MeSH data available.