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The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

Eppig JT, Blake JA, Bult CJ, Kadin JA, Richardson JE, Mouse Genome Database Gro - Nucleic Acids Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci.MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser.MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Jackson Laboratory, 600 Main Street, Bar Harbor, ME 04609, USA janan.eppig@jax.org.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Human–Mouse: Disease Connection (HMDC). The top panel shows the upper portion of the HMDC homepage. Searches can be initiated using human or mouse gene(s), location(s) or disease/phenotype terms. Alternatively VCF files or files of gene symbols or IDs can be submitted as search parameters. The disease/phenotype search box has an autocomplete feature allowing the user to choose the exact term desired. In this example Angelman Syndrome was selected. The results (middle panel) are presented in grid format, listing genes associated with Angelman Syndrome in human or mouse in the left-most columns. Grid colors representing mouse data are blue and human data are orange, with color intensity being darker for more annotations. Phenotype and disease terms are indicated in the columns on the right-hand side of the grid. Note that both human and mouse homologs (UBE3A and Ube3a, respectively) are associated with the disease. In addition, human CDKL5 and MECP2 are associated human genes and Snrpn is an associated mouse gene. This might suggest additional mouse models could be created by mutating mouse genes Cdkl5 or Mecp2; and that other potential human mutations in SNRPN might be examined as an Angelman Syndrome candidate gene. For genes that have known models in mice (Snrpn and Ube3a) a phenotype profile is provided. The red asterisk (*) indicate tabs that display data in a tabular format by genes or by diseases. Each colored cell within the grid is interactive and clicking on a cell leads to further details (bottom panel).
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Figure 1: Human–Mouse: Disease Connection (HMDC). The top panel shows the upper portion of the HMDC homepage. Searches can be initiated using human or mouse gene(s), location(s) or disease/phenotype terms. Alternatively VCF files or files of gene symbols or IDs can be submitted as search parameters. The disease/phenotype search box has an autocomplete feature allowing the user to choose the exact term desired. In this example Angelman Syndrome was selected. The results (middle panel) are presented in grid format, listing genes associated with Angelman Syndrome in human or mouse in the left-most columns. Grid colors representing mouse data are blue and human data are orange, with color intensity being darker for more annotations. Phenotype and disease terms are indicated in the columns on the right-hand side of the grid. Note that both human and mouse homologs (UBE3A and Ube3a, respectively) are associated with the disease. In addition, human CDKL5 and MECP2 are associated human genes and Snrpn is an associated mouse gene. This might suggest additional mouse models could be created by mutating mouse genes Cdkl5 or Mecp2; and that other potential human mutations in SNRPN might be examined as an Angelman Syndrome candidate gene. For genes that have known models in mice (Snrpn and Ube3a) a phenotype profile is provided. The red asterisk (*) indicate tabs that display data in a tabular format by genes or by diseases. Each colored cell within the grid is interactive and clicking on a cell leads to further details (bottom panel).

Mentions: The Human–Mouse: Disease Connection (http://www.diseasemodel.org) is a translational tool providing simultaneous access to human–mouse genomic, phenotypic and genetic disease information (Figure 1). Researchers can explore phenotypes and disease relationships, identify candidate genes and evaluate mouse mutants displaying a spectrum of indicative phenotypes. Within the web display, links to supporting mouse model publications and to repositories providing mouse resources make this tool informative as well as exploratory.


The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

Eppig JT, Blake JA, Bult CJ, Kadin JA, Richardson JE, Mouse Genome Database Gro - Nucleic Acids Res. (2014)

Human–Mouse: Disease Connection (HMDC). The top panel shows the upper portion of the HMDC homepage. Searches can be initiated using human or mouse gene(s), location(s) or disease/phenotype terms. Alternatively VCF files or files of gene symbols or IDs can be submitted as search parameters. The disease/phenotype search box has an autocomplete feature allowing the user to choose the exact term desired. In this example Angelman Syndrome was selected. The results (middle panel) are presented in grid format, listing genes associated with Angelman Syndrome in human or mouse in the left-most columns. Grid colors representing mouse data are blue and human data are orange, with color intensity being darker for more annotations. Phenotype and disease terms are indicated in the columns on the right-hand side of the grid. Note that both human and mouse homologs (UBE3A and Ube3a, respectively) are associated with the disease. In addition, human CDKL5 and MECP2 are associated human genes and Snrpn is an associated mouse gene. This might suggest additional mouse models could be created by mutating mouse genes Cdkl5 or Mecp2; and that other potential human mutations in SNRPN might be examined as an Angelman Syndrome candidate gene. For genes that have known models in mice (Snrpn and Ube3a) a phenotype profile is provided. The red asterisk (*) indicate tabs that display data in a tabular format by genes or by diseases. Each colored cell within the grid is interactive and clicking on a cell leads to further details (bottom panel).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4384027&req=5

Figure 1: Human–Mouse: Disease Connection (HMDC). The top panel shows the upper portion of the HMDC homepage. Searches can be initiated using human or mouse gene(s), location(s) or disease/phenotype terms. Alternatively VCF files or files of gene symbols or IDs can be submitted as search parameters. The disease/phenotype search box has an autocomplete feature allowing the user to choose the exact term desired. In this example Angelman Syndrome was selected. The results (middle panel) are presented in grid format, listing genes associated with Angelman Syndrome in human or mouse in the left-most columns. Grid colors representing mouse data are blue and human data are orange, with color intensity being darker for more annotations. Phenotype and disease terms are indicated in the columns on the right-hand side of the grid. Note that both human and mouse homologs (UBE3A and Ube3a, respectively) are associated with the disease. In addition, human CDKL5 and MECP2 are associated human genes and Snrpn is an associated mouse gene. This might suggest additional mouse models could be created by mutating mouse genes Cdkl5 or Mecp2; and that other potential human mutations in SNRPN might be examined as an Angelman Syndrome candidate gene. For genes that have known models in mice (Snrpn and Ube3a) a phenotype profile is provided. The red asterisk (*) indicate tabs that display data in a tabular format by genes or by diseases. Each colored cell within the grid is interactive and clicking on a cell leads to further details (bottom panel).
Mentions: The Human–Mouse: Disease Connection (http://www.diseasemodel.org) is a translational tool providing simultaneous access to human–mouse genomic, phenotypic and genetic disease information (Figure 1). Researchers can explore phenotypes and disease relationships, identify candidate genes and evaluate mouse mutants displaying a spectrum of indicative phenotypes. Within the web display, links to supporting mouse model publications and to repositories providing mouse resources make this tool informative as well as exploratory.

Bottom Line: MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci.MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser.MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Jackson Laboratory, 600 Main Street, Bar Harbor, ME 04609, USA janan.eppig@jax.org.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus