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PAHs in baby food: assessment of three different processing techniques for the preparation of reference materials.

Huertas-Pérez JF, Bordajandi LR, Sejerøe-Olsen B, Emteborg H, Baù A, Schimmel H, Dabrio M - Anal Bioanal Chem (2015)

Bottom Line: To this end, an analytical method based on a solid-liquid extraction followed by cleaning up with gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and solid phase extraction (SPE) and GC-IDMS determination, was validated in-house.It could be demonstrated that the procedure fulfilled the demands for application to the homogeneity and isochronous stability studies for the candidate reference materials targeted here.All three materials proved to be sufficiently homogeneous for the intended use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, 2440, Geel, Belgium, huertas@ugr.es.

ABSTRACT
A feasibility study for producing a matrix reference material for selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in baby food is reported. A commercially available baby food, containing carrots, potatoes, tomato, white beans and meat, was spiked with the so-called 15 + 1 PAHs included in the PAHs priority list for food of the EU, at a mass fraction level of 1 μg/kg. The contaminated baby food was further processed by autoclaving, freezing or freeze drying. The homogeneity of the three materials (bottle-to-bottle variation) and their short-term (4 weeks) and long-term (18 months) stability at different temperatures were assessed. To this end, an analytical method based on a solid-liquid extraction followed by cleaning up with gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and solid phase extraction (SPE) and GC-IDMS determination, was validated in-house. It could be demonstrated that the procedure fulfilled the demands for application to the homogeneity and isochronous stability studies for the candidate reference materials targeted here. All three materials proved to be sufficiently homogeneous for the intended use. Measurements on the autoclaved material provided the most promising results in terms of envisaged shelf life, although freeze drying was also found to be a suitable processing technique for most of the investigated PAHs. These results are an important step towards the development of a matrix reference material for PAHs in a processed food matrix in a presentation very similar to routine samples.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram for the preparation of the three materials considered in this study
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Fig1: Flow diagram for the preparation of the three materials considered in this study

Mentions: Figure 1 shows a flow diagram for the preparation of the three materials considered in this study. The content of 202 jars of commercially available baby food (40 kg of material) was placed in a stainless steel mixing vessel of a paste mixer (IKA-Janke Kunkel, Staufen, Germany) and mixed at full speed for 3 h. The baby food had a composition of 40 % carrots, 18 % potatoes, 18 % tomatoes, 13 % white beans, 10 % meat and 1 % maize oil, as stated by the product label, and was supplied as a very fine homogeneous paste. The direction of mixing was changed every 30 min. Next, 3.7 kg of the material were taken aside in a stainless steel container for blank samples. From the remaining material, a portion of 2.2 kg was placed into a glass beaker and thoroughly mixed with 22.8 g of a spiking solution, containing the 15 + 1 priority PAHs in MeCN at a mass fraction of approximately 2.2 μg/g each. The mixture was stirred manually with a glass rod and subsequently added to the rest of the baby food and homogenised for 6.5 h. The target mass fraction was 1 μg/kg for each PAH, as it is the maximum level established by the current EU regulation for BaP in baby food [12]. Once the material was thoroughly mixed it was divided in three parts for further treatment resulting in three different matrix presentations.Fig. 1


PAHs in baby food: assessment of three different processing techniques for the preparation of reference materials.

Huertas-Pérez JF, Bordajandi LR, Sejerøe-Olsen B, Emteborg H, Baù A, Schimmel H, Dabrio M - Anal Bioanal Chem (2015)

Flow diagram for the preparation of the three materials considered in this study
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383830&req=5

Fig1: Flow diagram for the preparation of the three materials considered in this study
Mentions: Figure 1 shows a flow diagram for the preparation of the three materials considered in this study. The content of 202 jars of commercially available baby food (40 kg of material) was placed in a stainless steel mixing vessel of a paste mixer (IKA-Janke Kunkel, Staufen, Germany) and mixed at full speed for 3 h. The baby food had a composition of 40 % carrots, 18 % potatoes, 18 % tomatoes, 13 % white beans, 10 % meat and 1 % maize oil, as stated by the product label, and was supplied as a very fine homogeneous paste. The direction of mixing was changed every 30 min. Next, 3.7 kg of the material were taken aside in a stainless steel container for blank samples. From the remaining material, a portion of 2.2 kg was placed into a glass beaker and thoroughly mixed with 22.8 g of a spiking solution, containing the 15 + 1 priority PAHs in MeCN at a mass fraction of approximately 2.2 μg/g each. The mixture was stirred manually with a glass rod and subsequently added to the rest of the baby food and homogenised for 6.5 h. The target mass fraction was 1 μg/kg for each PAH, as it is the maximum level established by the current EU regulation for BaP in baby food [12]. Once the material was thoroughly mixed it was divided in three parts for further treatment resulting in three different matrix presentations.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: To this end, an analytical method based on a solid-liquid extraction followed by cleaning up with gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and solid phase extraction (SPE) and GC-IDMS determination, was validated in-house.It could be demonstrated that the procedure fulfilled the demands for application to the homogeneity and isochronous stability studies for the candidate reference materials targeted here.All three materials proved to be sufficiently homogeneous for the intended use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, 2440, Geel, Belgium, huertas@ugr.es.

ABSTRACT
A feasibility study for producing a matrix reference material for selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in baby food is reported. A commercially available baby food, containing carrots, potatoes, tomato, white beans and meat, was spiked with the so-called 15 + 1 PAHs included in the PAHs priority list for food of the EU, at a mass fraction level of 1 μg/kg. The contaminated baby food was further processed by autoclaving, freezing or freeze drying. The homogeneity of the three materials (bottle-to-bottle variation) and their short-term (4 weeks) and long-term (18 months) stability at different temperatures were assessed. To this end, an analytical method based on a solid-liquid extraction followed by cleaning up with gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and solid phase extraction (SPE) and GC-IDMS determination, was validated in-house. It could be demonstrated that the procedure fulfilled the demands for application to the homogeneity and isochronous stability studies for the candidate reference materials targeted here. All three materials proved to be sufficiently homogeneous for the intended use. Measurements on the autoclaved material provided the most promising results in terms of envisaged shelf life, although freeze drying was also found to be a suitable processing technique for most of the investigated PAHs. These results are an important step towards the development of a matrix reference material for PAHs in a processed food matrix in a presentation very similar to routine samples.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus