Limits...
Short-term weight gain and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor classification among pre- and postmenopausal women.

Rosner B, Eliassen AH, Toriola AT, Hankinson SE, Willett WC, Natarajan L, Colditz GA - Breast Cancer Res. Treat. (2015)

Bottom Line: ER and PR status were obtained from pathology reports and medical records yielding a total of 2033 ER+/PR+ tumors, 595 ER-/PR- tumors, 512 ER+/PR- tumors.The association was stronger for premenopausal women (RR 1.38; 95 % CI 1.13-1.69) (P_trend = 0.004) than for postmenopausal women (RR 1.10; 95 % CI 0.97-1.25) (P_trend = 0.063).There are deleterious effects of short-term weight gain, particularly during pre-menopause, even after controlling for average BMI before and after menopause.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA, stbar@channing.harvard.edu.

ABSTRACT
Obesity is well established as a cause of postmenopausal breast cancer incidence and mortality. In contrast, adiposity in early life reduces breast cancer incidence. However, whether short-term weight change influences breast cancer risk is not well known. We followed a cohort of 77,232 women from 1980 to 2006 (1,445,578 person-years), with routinely updated risk factor information, documenting 4196 incident cases of invasive breast cancer. ER and PR status were obtained from pathology reports and medical records yielding a total of 2033 ER+/PR+ tumors, 595 ER-/PR- tumors, 512 ER+/PR- tumors. The log incidence breast cancer model was used to assess the association of short-term weight gain (over past 4 years) while controlling for average BMI before and after menopause. Short-term weight change was significantly associated with breast cancer risk (RR 1.20; 95 % CI 1.09-1.33) for a 4-year weight gain of ≥15 lbs versus no change (≤5 lbs) (P_trend < 0.001). The association was stronger for premenopausal women (RR 1.38; 95 % CI 1.13-1.69) (P_trend = 0.004) than for postmenopausal women (RR 1.10; 95 % CI 0.97-1.25) (P_trend = 0.063). Short-term weight gain during premenopause had a stronger association for ER+/PR- (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 2.19; 95 % CI 1.33-3.61, P = 0.002) and ER-/PR- breast cancer (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 1.61; 95 % CI 1.09-2.38, P = 0.016) than for ER+/PR+ breast cancer (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 1.13; 95 % CI 0.89-1.43, P = 0.32). There are deleterious effects of short-term weight gain, particularly during pre-menopause, even after controlling for average BMI before and after menopause. The association was stronger for ER+/PR- and ER-/PR- than for ER+/PR+ breast cancer.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Hazard ratio of incident breast cancer by 4-year weight change stratified by initial BMI. Loss weight loss of >5 lbs, No change weight gain or weight loss of ≤5 lbs, Small weight gain of 5.1–9.9 lbs, Moderate weight gain of 10.0–14.9 lbs, Large weight gain of ≥15.0 lbs
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383816&req=5

Fig2: Hazard ratio of incident breast cancer by 4-year weight change stratified by initial BMI. Loss weight loss of >5 lbs, No change weight gain or weight loss of ≤5 lbs, Small weight gain of 5.1–9.9 lbs, Moderate weight gain of 10.0–14.9 lbs, Large weight gain of ≥15.0 lbs

Mentions: We next evaluated the association for weight gain by strata of baseline BMI (<25/≥25 kg/m2). Leaner women gained more weight than overweight and obese women. The overall association for weight gain was stronger among lean women (RR = 1.26 for 25 lb weight change) than among overweight and obese (RR = 1.09) phet = 0.04 (see Table 3). Among postmenopausal women, the association did not differ by baseline BMI. However, among premenopausal women the association for weight change over 4-years and breast cancer risk was significantly stronger among those who were normal weight at baseline (RR 1.65 vs. 1.02 for 25 lb weight change phet < 0.001) (see Fig. 2), and similarly for weight gain of ≥15 lb versus no change.Fig. 2


Short-term weight gain and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor classification among pre- and postmenopausal women.

Rosner B, Eliassen AH, Toriola AT, Hankinson SE, Willett WC, Natarajan L, Colditz GA - Breast Cancer Res. Treat. (2015)

Hazard ratio of incident breast cancer by 4-year weight change stratified by initial BMI. Loss weight loss of >5 lbs, No change weight gain or weight loss of ≤5 lbs, Small weight gain of 5.1–9.9 lbs, Moderate weight gain of 10.0–14.9 lbs, Large weight gain of ≥15.0 lbs
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383816&req=5

Fig2: Hazard ratio of incident breast cancer by 4-year weight change stratified by initial BMI. Loss weight loss of >5 lbs, No change weight gain or weight loss of ≤5 lbs, Small weight gain of 5.1–9.9 lbs, Moderate weight gain of 10.0–14.9 lbs, Large weight gain of ≥15.0 lbs
Mentions: We next evaluated the association for weight gain by strata of baseline BMI (<25/≥25 kg/m2). Leaner women gained more weight than overweight and obese women. The overall association for weight gain was stronger among lean women (RR = 1.26 for 25 lb weight change) than among overweight and obese (RR = 1.09) phet = 0.04 (see Table 3). Among postmenopausal women, the association did not differ by baseline BMI. However, among premenopausal women the association for weight change over 4-years and breast cancer risk was significantly stronger among those who were normal weight at baseline (RR 1.65 vs. 1.02 for 25 lb weight change phet < 0.001) (see Fig. 2), and similarly for weight gain of ≥15 lb versus no change.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: ER and PR status were obtained from pathology reports and medical records yielding a total of 2033 ER+/PR+ tumors, 595 ER-/PR- tumors, 512 ER+/PR- tumors.The association was stronger for premenopausal women (RR 1.38; 95 % CI 1.13-1.69) (P_trend = 0.004) than for postmenopausal women (RR 1.10; 95 % CI 0.97-1.25) (P_trend = 0.063).There are deleterious effects of short-term weight gain, particularly during pre-menopause, even after controlling for average BMI before and after menopause.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA, stbar@channing.harvard.edu.

ABSTRACT
Obesity is well established as a cause of postmenopausal breast cancer incidence and mortality. In contrast, adiposity in early life reduces breast cancer incidence. However, whether short-term weight change influences breast cancer risk is not well known. We followed a cohort of 77,232 women from 1980 to 2006 (1,445,578 person-years), with routinely updated risk factor information, documenting 4196 incident cases of invasive breast cancer. ER and PR status were obtained from pathology reports and medical records yielding a total of 2033 ER+/PR+ tumors, 595 ER-/PR- tumors, 512 ER+/PR- tumors. The log incidence breast cancer model was used to assess the association of short-term weight gain (over past 4 years) while controlling for average BMI before and after menopause. Short-term weight change was significantly associated with breast cancer risk (RR 1.20; 95 % CI 1.09-1.33) for a 4-year weight gain of ≥15 lbs versus no change (≤5 lbs) (P_trend < 0.001). The association was stronger for premenopausal women (RR 1.38; 95 % CI 1.13-1.69) (P_trend = 0.004) than for postmenopausal women (RR 1.10; 95 % CI 0.97-1.25) (P_trend = 0.063). Short-term weight gain during premenopause had a stronger association for ER+/PR- (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 2.19; 95 % CI 1.33-3.61, P = 0.002) and ER-/PR- breast cancer (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 1.61; 95 % CI 1.09-2.38, P = 0.016) than for ER+/PR+ breast cancer (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 1.13; 95 % CI 0.89-1.43, P = 0.32). There are deleterious effects of short-term weight gain, particularly during pre-menopause, even after controlling for average BMI before and after menopause. The association was stronger for ER+/PR- and ER-/PR- than for ER+/PR+ breast cancer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus