Limits...
Epidemiology and molecular phylogeny of Babesia sp. in Little Penguins Eudyptula minor in Australia.

Vanstreels RE, Woehler EJ, Ruoppolo V, Vertigan P, Carlile N, Priddel D, Finger A, Dann P, Herrin KV, Thompson P, Ferreira Junior FC, Braga ÉM, Hurtado R, Epiphanio S, Catão-Dias JL - Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl (2015)

Bottom Line: Only round forms of the parasite were observed, and gene sequencing confirmed the identity of the parasite and demonstrated it is closely related to Babesia poelea from boobies (Sula spp.) and B. uriae from murres (Uria aalge).None of the Babesia-positive penguins presented signs of disease, confirming earlier suggestions that chronic infections by these parasites are not substantially problematic to otherwise healthy little penguins.We searched also for kinetoplastids, and despite targeted sampling of little penguins near the location where Trypanosoma eudyptulae was originally reported, this parasite was not detected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Wildlife Comparative Pathology (LAPCOM), Department of Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Blood parasites are potential threats to the health of penguins and to their conservation and management. Little penguins Eudyptula minor are native to Australia and New Zealand, and are susceptible to piroplasmids (Babesia), hemosporidians (Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, Plasmodium) and kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma). We studied a total of 263 wild little penguins at 20 sites along the Australian southeastern coast, in addition to 16 captive-bred little penguins. Babesia sp. was identified in seven wild little penguins, with positive individuals recorded in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania. True prevalence was estimated between 3.4% and 4.5%. Only round forms of the parasite were observed, and gene sequencing confirmed the identity of the parasite and demonstrated it is closely related to Babesia poelea from boobies (Sula spp.) and B. uriae from murres (Uria aalge). None of the Babesia-positive penguins presented signs of disease, confirming earlier suggestions that chronic infections by these parasites are not substantially problematic to otherwise healthy little penguins. We searched also for kinetoplastids, and despite targeted sampling of little penguins near the location where Trypanosoma eudyptulae was originally reported, this parasite was not detected.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Babesia sp. in the blood smear of a little penguin. Individual details: TAS-124, male, adult, moulting, sampled at “Darlington Foreshore” (Maria Island, Tasmania) in 21/02/2013, Genbank ascension number KP144323, Giemsa stain.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-SA
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383760&req=5

f0020: Babesia sp. in the blood smear of a little penguin. Individual details: TAS-124, male, adult, moulting, sampled at “Darlington Foreshore” (Maria Island, Tasmania) in 21/02/2013, Genbank ascension number KP144323, Giemsa stain.

Mentions: Round intracytoplasmatic parasites were observed in the erythrocytes of seven wild little penguin blood smears (Fig. 2). These parasites were most compatible with round forms of piroplasmids (Babesia sp.), but early stages of haemosporidians (Haemoproteus sp., Plasmodium sp., Leucocytozoon sp.) could not be discarded on the basis of morphology. No other parasite forms were observed in any of the blood smears, and no blood parasites were detected in the blood smears of the captive-bred penguins sampled in this study.


Epidemiology and molecular phylogeny of Babesia sp. in Little Penguins Eudyptula minor in Australia.

Vanstreels RE, Woehler EJ, Ruoppolo V, Vertigan P, Carlile N, Priddel D, Finger A, Dann P, Herrin KV, Thompson P, Ferreira Junior FC, Braga ÉM, Hurtado R, Epiphanio S, Catão-Dias JL - Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl (2015)

Babesia sp. in the blood smear of a little penguin. Individual details: TAS-124, male, adult, moulting, sampled at “Darlington Foreshore” (Maria Island, Tasmania) in 21/02/2013, Genbank ascension number KP144323, Giemsa stain.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-SA
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383760&req=5

f0020: Babesia sp. in the blood smear of a little penguin. Individual details: TAS-124, male, adult, moulting, sampled at “Darlington Foreshore” (Maria Island, Tasmania) in 21/02/2013, Genbank ascension number KP144323, Giemsa stain.
Mentions: Round intracytoplasmatic parasites were observed in the erythrocytes of seven wild little penguin blood smears (Fig. 2). These parasites were most compatible with round forms of piroplasmids (Babesia sp.), but early stages of haemosporidians (Haemoproteus sp., Plasmodium sp., Leucocytozoon sp.) could not be discarded on the basis of morphology. No other parasite forms were observed in any of the blood smears, and no blood parasites were detected in the blood smears of the captive-bred penguins sampled in this study.

Bottom Line: Only round forms of the parasite were observed, and gene sequencing confirmed the identity of the parasite and demonstrated it is closely related to Babesia poelea from boobies (Sula spp.) and B. uriae from murres (Uria aalge).None of the Babesia-positive penguins presented signs of disease, confirming earlier suggestions that chronic infections by these parasites are not substantially problematic to otherwise healthy little penguins.We searched also for kinetoplastids, and despite targeted sampling of little penguins near the location where Trypanosoma eudyptulae was originally reported, this parasite was not detected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Wildlife Comparative Pathology (LAPCOM), Department of Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Blood parasites are potential threats to the health of penguins and to their conservation and management. Little penguins Eudyptula minor are native to Australia and New Zealand, and are susceptible to piroplasmids (Babesia), hemosporidians (Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, Plasmodium) and kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma). We studied a total of 263 wild little penguins at 20 sites along the Australian southeastern coast, in addition to 16 captive-bred little penguins. Babesia sp. was identified in seven wild little penguins, with positive individuals recorded in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania. True prevalence was estimated between 3.4% and 4.5%. Only round forms of the parasite were observed, and gene sequencing confirmed the identity of the parasite and demonstrated it is closely related to Babesia poelea from boobies (Sula spp.) and B. uriae from murres (Uria aalge). None of the Babesia-positive penguins presented signs of disease, confirming earlier suggestions that chronic infections by these parasites are not substantially problematic to otherwise healthy little penguins. We searched also for kinetoplastids, and despite targeted sampling of little penguins near the location where Trypanosoma eudyptulae was originally reported, this parasite was not detected.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus