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Three-dimensional regulation of transcription.

Cao J, Luo Z, Cheng Q, Xu Q, Zhang Y, Wang F, Wu Y, Song X - Protein Cell (2015)

Bottom Line: Cells can adapt to environment and development by reconstructing their transcriptional networks to regulate diverse cellular processes without altering the underlying DNA sequences.Numerous evidences demonstrate that epigenetic changes are governed by various types of determinants, including DNA methylation patterns, histone posttranslational modification signatures, histone variants, chromatin remodeling, and recently discovered chromosome conformation characteristics and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs).Here, we highlight recent efforts on how the two latter epigenetic factors participate in the sophisticated transcriptional process and describe emerging techniques which permit us to uncover and gain insights into the fascinating genomic regulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CAS Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230027, China.

ABSTRACT
Cells can adapt to environment and development by reconstructing their transcriptional networks to regulate diverse cellular processes without altering the underlying DNA sequences. These alterations, namely epigenetic changes, occur during cell division, differentiation and cell death. Numerous evidences demonstrate that epigenetic changes are governed by various types of determinants, including DNA methylation patterns, histone posttranslational modification signatures, histone variants, chromatin remodeling, and recently discovered chromosome conformation characteristics and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Here, we highlight recent efforts on how the two latter epigenetic factors participate in the sophisticated transcriptional process and describe emerging techniques which permit us to uncover and gain insights into the fascinating genomic regulation.

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The regulatory models of lncRNAs
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig4: The regulatory models of lncRNAs

Mentions: LncRNAs act as “decoy” RNAs (Fig. 4A). LncRNAs can bind to transcription factors or some other proteins away from chromatin and prevent them from binding to their proper regulatory targets. Growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5) lncRNA, transcribed from exon 7 of Gas5 gene, directly interacts with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by acting as a decoy RNA version of the “glucocorticoid response element (GRE)”, thus competing with DNA GREs for binding to the GR DBD. Gas5, acting as a “riborepressor” of the GR, thus influences cell survival and metabolic activities during starvation by modulating GR-induced transcriptional activity of endogenous glucocorticoid-responsive genes (Kino et al., 2010).Figure 4


Three-dimensional regulation of transcription.

Cao J, Luo Z, Cheng Q, Xu Q, Zhang Y, Wang F, Wu Y, Song X - Protein Cell (2015)

The regulatory models of lncRNAs
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383755&req=5

Fig4: The regulatory models of lncRNAs
Mentions: LncRNAs act as “decoy” RNAs (Fig. 4A). LncRNAs can bind to transcription factors or some other proteins away from chromatin and prevent them from binding to their proper regulatory targets. Growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5) lncRNA, transcribed from exon 7 of Gas5 gene, directly interacts with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by acting as a decoy RNA version of the “glucocorticoid response element (GRE)”, thus competing with DNA GREs for binding to the GR DBD. Gas5, acting as a “riborepressor” of the GR, thus influences cell survival and metabolic activities during starvation by modulating GR-induced transcriptional activity of endogenous glucocorticoid-responsive genes (Kino et al., 2010).Figure 4

Bottom Line: Cells can adapt to environment and development by reconstructing their transcriptional networks to regulate diverse cellular processes without altering the underlying DNA sequences.Numerous evidences demonstrate that epigenetic changes are governed by various types of determinants, including DNA methylation patterns, histone posttranslational modification signatures, histone variants, chromatin remodeling, and recently discovered chromosome conformation characteristics and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs).Here, we highlight recent efforts on how the two latter epigenetic factors participate in the sophisticated transcriptional process and describe emerging techniques which permit us to uncover and gain insights into the fascinating genomic regulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CAS Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230027, China.

ABSTRACT
Cells can adapt to environment and development by reconstructing their transcriptional networks to regulate diverse cellular processes without altering the underlying DNA sequences. These alterations, namely epigenetic changes, occur during cell division, differentiation and cell death. Numerous evidences demonstrate that epigenetic changes are governed by various types of determinants, including DNA methylation patterns, histone posttranslational modification signatures, histone variants, chromatin remodeling, and recently discovered chromosome conformation characteristics and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Here, we highlight recent efforts on how the two latter epigenetic factors participate in the sophisticated transcriptional process and describe emerging techniques which permit us to uncover and gain insights into the fascinating genomic regulation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus