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Application of GFP imaging in cancer.

Hoffman RM - Lab. Invest. (2015)

Bottom Line: Non-invasive imaging with fluorescent proteins enabled the dynamics of metastatic cancer to be followed in real time in individual animals.Recent applications of the technology described here include linking fluorescent proteins with cell-cycle-specific proteins such that the cells change color from red to green as they transit from G1 to S phases.With the macro- and micro-imaging technologies described here, essentially any in vivo process can be imaged, giving rise to the new field of in vivo cell biology using fluorescent proteins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: AntiCancer, Inc., Department of Surgery, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Multicolored proteins have allowed the color-coding of cancer cells growing in vivo and enabled the distinction of host from tumor with single-cell resolution. Non-invasive imaging with fluorescent proteins enabled the dynamics of metastatic cancer to be followed in real time in individual animals. Non-invasive imaging of cancer cells expressing fluorescent proteins has allowed the real-time determination of efficacy of candidate antitumor and antimetastatic agents in mouse models. The use of fluorescent proteins to differentially label cancer cells in the nucleus and cytoplasm can visualize the nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics of cancer cells in vivo including: mitosis, apoptosis, cell-cycle position, and differential behavior of nucleus and cytoplasm that occurs during cancer-cell deformation and extravasation. Recent applications of the technology described here include linking fluorescent proteins with cell-cycle-specific proteins such that the cells change color from red to green as they transit from G1 to S phases. With the macro- and micro-imaging technologies described here, essentially any in vivo process can be imaged, giving rise to the new field of in vivo cell biology using fluorescent proteins.

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Transgenic RFP nude mouseAll of the major organs and tissues are red under fluorescence excitation with blue light. (A) Whole-body image of transgenic RFP nude mouse. Image was taken with a Hamamatsu C5810 tree-chip CCD camera. (B) Brain. (C) Heart and lungs. (D) Liver. (E) Circulatory system. (F) Uterus and ovary. (G) Pancreas. (H) Kidney and adrenal gland. (I) Spleen. (B-I) Images were taken with the Indec Biosystems FluorVivo imaging system.113
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Figure 13: Transgenic RFP nude mouseAll of the major organs and tissues are red under fluorescence excitation with blue light. (A) Whole-body image of transgenic RFP nude mouse. Image was taken with a Hamamatsu C5810 tree-chip CCD camera. (B) Brain. (C) Heart and lungs. (D) Liver. (E) Circulatory system. (F) Uterus and ovary. (G) Pancreas. (H) Kidney and adrenal gland. (I) Spleen. (B-I) Images were taken with the Indec Biosystems FluorVivo imaging system.113

Mentions: The GFP, RFP and CFP nude mice appear to have a life span similar to that of nontransgenic nude mice, such that longterm tumor growth and metastasis studies can be carried out.112, 113 Thus, fluorescent proteins are not toxic to the animal (Figure 13).


Application of GFP imaging in cancer.

Hoffman RM - Lab. Invest. (2015)

Transgenic RFP nude mouseAll of the major organs and tissues are red under fluorescence excitation with blue light. (A) Whole-body image of transgenic RFP nude mouse. Image was taken with a Hamamatsu C5810 tree-chip CCD camera. (B) Brain. (C) Heart and lungs. (D) Liver. (E) Circulatory system. (F) Uterus and ovary. (G) Pancreas. (H) Kidney and adrenal gland. (I) Spleen. (B-I) Images were taken with the Indec Biosystems FluorVivo imaging system.113
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383682&req=5

Figure 13: Transgenic RFP nude mouseAll of the major organs and tissues are red under fluorescence excitation with blue light. (A) Whole-body image of transgenic RFP nude mouse. Image was taken with a Hamamatsu C5810 tree-chip CCD camera. (B) Brain. (C) Heart and lungs. (D) Liver. (E) Circulatory system. (F) Uterus and ovary. (G) Pancreas. (H) Kidney and adrenal gland. (I) Spleen. (B-I) Images were taken with the Indec Biosystems FluorVivo imaging system.113
Mentions: The GFP, RFP and CFP nude mice appear to have a life span similar to that of nontransgenic nude mice, such that longterm tumor growth and metastasis studies can be carried out.112, 113 Thus, fluorescent proteins are not toxic to the animal (Figure 13).

Bottom Line: Non-invasive imaging with fluorescent proteins enabled the dynamics of metastatic cancer to be followed in real time in individual animals.Recent applications of the technology described here include linking fluorescent proteins with cell-cycle-specific proteins such that the cells change color from red to green as they transit from G1 to S phases.With the macro- and micro-imaging technologies described here, essentially any in vivo process can be imaged, giving rise to the new field of in vivo cell biology using fluorescent proteins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: AntiCancer, Inc., Department of Surgery, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Multicolored proteins have allowed the color-coding of cancer cells growing in vivo and enabled the distinction of host from tumor with single-cell resolution. Non-invasive imaging with fluorescent proteins enabled the dynamics of metastatic cancer to be followed in real time in individual animals. Non-invasive imaging of cancer cells expressing fluorescent proteins has allowed the real-time determination of efficacy of candidate antitumor and antimetastatic agents in mouse models. The use of fluorescent proteins to differentially label cancer cells in the nucleus and cytoplasm can visualize the nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics of cancer cells in vivo including: mitosis, apoptosis, cell-cycle position, and differential behavior of nucleus and cytoplasm that occurs during cancer-cell deformation and extravasation. Recent applications of the technology described here include linking fluorescent proteins with cell-cycle-specific proteins such that the cells change color from red to green as they transit from G1 to S phases. With the macro- and micro-imaging technologies described here, essentially any in vivo process can be imaged, giving rise to the new field of in vivo cell biology using fluorescent proteins.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus