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Development of a complex intervention to improve health literacy skills.

Austvoll-Dahlgren A, Danielsen S, Opheim E, Bjørndal A, Reinar LM, Flottorp S, Oxman AD, Helseth S - Health Info Libr J (2013)

Bottom Line: The web portal targeted the general public and took the form of structured sets of tools.The web portal was designed in a systematic and transparent way and address key barriers to obtaining and acting upon reliable health information.The web portal provides open access to the tools and can be used independently by health care users, or during consultations with health professionals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Prevention, Health Promotion and Organisation Unit, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Oslo, Norway.

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Model describing phases of complex interventions by van Boekhoven et al.
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fig01: Model describing phases of complex interventions by van Boekhoven et al.

Mentions: There is no universally optimal way of developing complex interventions, but explorative approaches are encouraged that are also systematic and transparent.13,17 Despite the methodological uncertainties associated with such interventions, some guiding rules have been advanced.17,18 A complex intervention often includes several steps or stages (which may not necessarily occur in a linear sequence), in Van Boekhoven et al.' model, which inspired our work, these steps include problem analysis, designing the intervention, piloting and feasibility testing, implementation and evaluations (see Figure1).17,18 The development of our complex intervention included all of these steps. Decisions related to the content and main focus of our intervention, as well as about which specific health literacy skills to target, were informed by qualitative interviews including members of the general public exploring decision-making and beliefs associated with obtaining health information, and a questionnaire where we explored important predictors associated with intention to search. The results of these studies have been previously published.19–21 Supplementing these studies, we also conducted explorative searches in Medline for studies describing barriers and facilitators to obtaining health information related to health literacy, using the following terms: (public or patient or consumer) and (information or Internet or mass media) and (health behaviour or search or attitude or decision or participation). We also looked through reference lists of relevant studies and searched for studies similar to these. We also scrutinised studies that had referenced these studies.


Development of a complex intervention to improve health literacy skills.

Austvoll-Dahlgren A, Danielsen S, Opheim E, Bjørndal A, Reinar LM, Flottorp S, Oxman AD, Helseth S - Health Info Libr J (2013)

Model describing phases of complex interventions by van Boekhoven et al.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383652&req=5

fig01: Model describing phases of complex interventions by van Boekhoven et al.
Mentions: There is no universally optimal way of developing complex interventions, but explorative approaches are encouraged that are also systematic and transparent.13,17 Despite the methodological uncertainties associated with such interventions, some guiding rules have been advanced.17,18 A complex intervention often includes several steps or stages (which may not necessarily occur in a linear sequence), in Van Boekhoven et al.' model, which inspired our work, these steps include problem analysis, designing the intervention, piloting and feasibility testing, implementation and evaluations (see Figure1).17,18 The development of our complex intervention included all of these steps. Decisions related to the content and main focus of our intervention, as well as about which specific health literacy skills to target, were informed by qualitative interviews including members of the general public exploring decision-making and beliefs associated with obtaining health information, and a questionnaire where we explored important predictors associated with intention to search. The results of these studies have been previously published.19–21 Supplementing these studies, we also conducted explorative searches in Medline for studies describing barriers and facilitators to obtaining health information related to health literacy, using the following terms: (public or patient or consumer) and (information or Internet or mass media) and (health behaviour or search or attitude or decision or participation). We also looked through reference lists of relevant studies and searched for studies similar to these. We also scrutinised studies that had referenced these studies.

Bottom Line: The web portal targeted the general public and took the form of structured sets of tools.The web portal was designed in a systematic and transparent way and address key barriers to obtaining and acting upon reliable health information.The web portal provides open access to the tools and can be used independently by health care users, or during consultations with health professionals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Prevention, Health Promotion and Organisation Unit, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Oslo, Norway.

Show MeSH