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Early successional microhabitats allow the persistence of endangered plants in coastal sand dunes.

Pardini EA, Vickstrom KE, Knight TM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Lupinus tidestromii plants in early successional microhabitats had higher projected rates of population growth than those associated with stabilized, late successional habitats, due primarily to higher rates of recruitment in early successional microhabitats.These results support the idea that restoration of disturbance is critical in historically dynamic landscapes.Our results suggest that large-scale restorations are necessary to allow persistence of the endemic plant species that characterize these ecosystems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Many species are adapted to disturbance and occur within dynamic, mosaic landscapes that contain early and late successional microhabitats. Human modification of disturbance regimes alters the availability of microhabitats and may affect the viability of species in these ecosystems. Because restoring historical disturbance regimes is typically expensive and requires action at large spatial scales, such restoration projects must be justified by linking the persistence of species with successional microhabitats. Coastal sand dune ecosystems worldwide are characterized by their endemic biodiversity and frequent disturbance. Dune-stabilizing invasive plants alter successional dynamics and may threaten species in these ecosystems. We examined the distribution and population dynamics of two federally endangered plant species, the annual Layia carnosa and the perennial Lupinus tidestromii, within a dune ecosystem in northern California, USA. We parameterized a matrix population model for L. tidestromii and examined the magnitude by which the successional stage of the habitat (early or late) influenced population dynamics. Both species had higher frequencies and L. tidestromii had higher frequency of seedlings in early successional habitats. Lupinus tidestromii plants in early successional microhabitats had higher projected rates of population growth than those associated with stabilized, late successional habitats, due primarily to higher rates of recruitment in early successional microhabitats. These results support the idea that restoration of disturbance is critical in historically dynamic landscapes. Our results suggest that large-scale restorations are necessary to allow persistence of the endemic plant species that characterize these ecosystems.

No MeSH data available.


Population growth rate of Lupinus tidestromii in different successional microhabitats.Deterministic matrix model projections of population growth rate (λ) for Lupinus tidestromii at Abbotts Lagoon are higher in early microhabitats in 2010 and 2011. We present observed values and 95% confidence intervals from 1,000 bootstrap estimates.
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pone.0119567.g004: Population growth rate of Lupinus tidestromii in different successional microhabitats.Deterministic matrix model projections of population growth rate (λ) for Lupinus tidestromii at Abbotts Lagoon are higher in early microhabitats in 2010 and 2011. We present observed values and 95% confidence intervals from 1,000 bootstrap estimates.

Mentions: The stage transitions of the seedling, non-reproductive, and reproductive plants did not vary in a consistent manner between microhabitats. For example, there were more seedlings that became non-reproductive plants in the early compared to the late successional habitat in 2011–2012, but this was not the case in the 2010–2011 (Table 2). In 2010 compared to 2011, plants produced fewer racemes and those racemes were more likely to abort their fruits or be consumed by pre-dispersal seed predators. Recruitment (e1) was significantly higher (randomization test, P = 0.0023) in early compared to late successional habitats in both years (Table 3). As a result, projected rates of population growth (λ) were higher in 2011 compared to 2010 and in both years, plants in early successional microhabitats had a higher λ than those in late successional microhabitats (Fig. 4).


Early successional microhabitats allow the persistence of endangered plants in coastal sand dunes.

Pardini EA, Vickstrom KE, Knight TM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Population growth rate of Lupinus tidestromii in different successional microhabitats.Deterministic matrix model projections of population growth rate (λ) for Lupinus tidestromii at Abbotts Lagoon are higher in early microhabitats in 2010 and 2011. We present observed values and 95% confidence intervals from 1,000 bootstrap estimates.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383614&req=5

pone.0119567.g004: Population growth rate of Lupinus tidestromii in different successional microhabitats.Deterministic matrix model projections of population growth rate (λ) for Lupinus tidestromii at Abbotts Lagoon are higher in early microhabitats in 2010 and 2011. We present observed values and 95% confidence intervals from 1,000 bootstrap estimates.
Mentions: The stage transitions of the seedling, non-reproductive, and reproductive plants did not vary in a consistent manner between microhabitats. For example, there were more seedlings that became non-reproductive plants in the early compared to the late successional habitat in 2011–2012, but this was not the case in the 2010–2011 (Table 2). In 2010 compared to 2011, plants produced fewer racemes and those racemes were more likely to abort their fruits or be consumed by pre-dispersal seed predators. Recruitment (e1) was significantly higher (randomization test, P = 0.0023) in early compared to late successional habitats in both years (Table 3). As a result, projected rates of population growth (λ) were higher in 2011 compared to 2010 and in both years, plants in early successional microhabitats had a higher λ than those in late successional microhabitats (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: Lupinus tidestromii plants in early successional microhabitats had higher projected rates of population growth than those associated with stabilized, late successional habitats, due primarily to higher rates of recruitment in early successional microhabitats.These results support the idea that restoration of disturbance is critical in historically dynamic landscapes.Our results suggest that large-scale restorations are necessary to allow persistence of the endemic plant species that characterize these ecosystems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Many species are adapted to disturbance and occur within dynamic, mosaic landscapes that contain early and late successional microhabitats. Human modification of disturbance regimes alters the availability of microhabitats and may affect the viability of species in these ecosystems. Because restoring historical disturbance regimes is typically expensive and requires action at large spatial scales, such restoration projects must be justified by linking the persistence of species with successional microhabitats. Coastal sand dune ecosystems worldwide are characterized by their endemic biodiversity and frequent disturbance. Dune-stabilizing invasive plants alter successional dynamics and may threaten species in these ecosystems. We examined the distribution and population dynamics of two federally endangered plant species, the annual Layia carnosa and the perennial Lupinus tidestromii, within a dune ecosystem in northern California, USA. We parameterized a matrix population model for L. tidestromii and examined the magnitude by which the successional stage of the habitat (early or late) influenced population dynamics. Both species had higher frequencies and L. tidestromii had higher frequency of seedlings in early successional habitats. Lupinus tidestromii plants in early successional microhabitats had higher projected rates of population growth than those associated with stabilized, late successional habitats, due primarily to higher rates of recruitment in early successional microhabitats. These results support the idea that restoration of disturbance is critical in historically dynamic landscapes. Our results suggest that large-scale restorations are necessary to allow persistence of the endemic plant species that characterize these ecosystems.

No MeSH data available.