Limits...
Warming trend: how climate shapes Vibrio ecology.

Levy S - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Localized outbreaks of cholera have been recorded since ancient times; the first documented pandemic began in 1817 in the Ganges River Delta and spread as far as the Middle East and East Africa, resulting in hundreds of thousands of deaths... A phytoplankton bloom means more food for copepods and other zooplankton; thus, as their copepod hosts become abundant, so do vibrios... To gather clues to the environmental factors involved in cholera in these epidemic regions, Colwell and Antarpreet Jutla of West Virginia University studied historical data on air temperature, rainfall, and cholera outbreaks in India’s Indus River Basin from 1875 to 1900... They found that epidemics were strongly predicted by a particular weather pattern: an unusually hot summer followed by heavy rainfall in the fall... Vibrios thrive in warm, low-salinity water... Baker-Austin notes that one of the most obvious manifestations of a warming climate is an increase in the frequency and severity of heat waves... In a recent study, he and his colleagues examined long-term data on sea surface temperature in the Baltic and found a clear correlation between episodes of unusually high water temperature and outbreaks of pathogenic vibrio infections... Many cases of vibrionic gastroenteritis are not severe enough to send people to the doctor—or if they go to the doctor, there may or may not be a stool culture to confirm Vibrio infection. “For every laboratory-confirmed infection,” Baker-Austin says, “there are many more circulating in the community. ” Jan Semenza and his colleagues at the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) have used data on sea surface temperature and salinity, obtained from remote-sensing satellites, to create a real-time model that shows coastal areas that are environmentally suitable for vibrio growth... The Vibrio Risk Map, available through the ECDC’s E3 Geoportal website, shows coastal areas where sea surface temperatures and salinity levels indicate favorable conditions for Vibrio growth. “The purpose of this tool is to alert the public that there is a potential vibrio bloom, a potential health threat,” says Semenza... She passes a plaque memorializing the workers who died of cholera while building the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal in the 1830s... The workers, impoverished Irish immigrants, lived in crowded shacks without safe drinking water or sanitation... As climate shifts, the communities most vulnerable to cholera will need clean water and sanitation more than ever... The World Health Organization estimates that 748 million people worldwide currently have no access to safe drinking water, and approximately 1.8 billion use water sources that are contaminated with fecal matter... Beyond the complexities of vibrio ecology lies the daunting challenge of providing safe water and sanitation to growing human populations in a warming world.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

It’s been suggested that the island nation’s limestone foundation may have contributed to the cholera epidemic by increasing the alkalinity of Haiti’s rivers, achieving a pH more favorable for V. cholerae growth.© John B. Crane
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383571&req=5

d35e174: It’s been suggested that the island nation’s limestone foundation may have contributed to the cholera epidemic by increasing the alkalinity of Haiti’s rivers, achieving a pH more favorable for V. cholerae growth.© John B. Crane


Warming trend: how climate shapes Vibrio ecology.

Levy S - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

It’s been suggested that the island nation’s limestone foundation may have contributed to the cholera epidemic by increasing the alkalinity of Haiti’s rivers, achieving a pH more favorable for V. cholerae growth.© John B. Crane
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383571&req=5

d35e174: It’s been suggested that the island nation’s limestone foundation may have contributed to the cholera epidemic by increasing the alkalinity of Haiti’s rivers, achieving a pH more favorable for V. cholerae growth.© John B. Crane

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Localized outbreaks of cholera have been recorded since ancient times; the first documented pandemic began in 1817 in the Ganges River Delta and spread as far as the Middle East and East Africa, resulting in hundreds of thousands of deaths... A phytoplankton bloom means more food for copepods and other zooplankton; thus, as their copepod hosts become abundant, so do vibrios... To gather clues to the environmental factors involved in cholera in these epidemic regions, Colwell and Antarpreet Jutla of West Virginia University studied historical data on air temperature, rainfall, and cholera outbreaks in India’s Indus River Basin from 1875 to 1900... They found that epidemics were strongly predicted by a particular weather pattern: an unusually hot summer followed by heavy rainfall in the fall... Vibrios thrive in warm, low-salinity water... Baker-Austin notes that one of the most obvious manifestations of a warming climate is an increase in the frequency and severity of heat waves... In a recent study, he and his colleagues examined long-term data on sea surface temperature in the Baltic and found a clear correlation between episodes of unusually high water temperature and outbreaks of pathogenic vibrio infections... Many cases of vibrionic gastroenteritis are not severe enough to send people to the doctor—or if they go to the doctor, there may or may not be a stool culture to confirm Vibrio infection. “For every laboratory-confirmed infection,” Baker-Austin says, “there are many more circulating in the community. ” Jan Semenza and his colleagues at the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) have used data on sea surface temperature and salinity, obtained from remote-sensing satellites, to create a real-time model that shows coastal areas that are environmentally suitable for vibrio growth... The Vibrio Risk Map, available through the ECDC’s E3 Geoportal website, shows coastal areas where sea surface temperatures and salinity levels indicate favorable conditions for Vibrio growth. “The purpose of this tool is to alert the public that there is a potential vibrio bloom, a potential health threat,” says Semenza... She passes a plaque memorializing the workers who died of cholera while building the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal in the 1830s... The workers, impoverished Irish immigrants, lived in crowded shacks without safe drinking water or sanitation... As climate shifts, the communities most vulnerable to cholera will need clean water and sanitation more than ever... The World Health Organization estimates that 748 million people worldwide currently have no access to safe drinking water, and approximately 1.8 billion use water sources that are contaminated with fecal matter... Beyond the complexities of vibrio ecology lies the daunting challenge of providing safe water and sanitation to growing human populations in a warming world.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus