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Factors affecting dengue prevention practices: nationwide survey of the Malaysian public.

Wong LP, Shakir SM, Atefi N, AbuBakar S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A national telephone survey was carried out with 2,512 individuals of the Malaysian public aged 18-60 years.Households of lower income of which the majority (40.7%) were from the rural areas, were associated with the highest odds [OR = 1.33; 95%CI = 1.09-1.67; p = 0.004] of dengue prevention.Dengue prevention practices are also less likely to be practiced by skilled workers [OR = 0.78; 95%CI = 0.63-0.95; p = 0.029] compared to those unemployed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Julius Centre University of Malaya (JCUM), University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Efforts to stamp dengue in many dengue endemic countries has met little success. There is a need to re-examine and understand how the public at large view the dengue prevention efforts. This study aimed to examine the demographic factors, theoretical constructs of the Health Belief Model and knowledge about dengue and how these influence the practice of dengue prevention.

Methods: A national telephone survey was carried out with 2,512 individuals of the Malaysian public aged 18-60 years.

Results: The majority (73%) of the Malaysian public had a total dengue prevention score of 51-100 (of a possible score of 1-100). Multivariate analysis suggests significant correlates of higher dengue prevention practices with demographic background, perception of susceptibility to dengue, perceived density of mosquitoes in the neighbourhood and knowledge about dengue. Households of lower income of which the majority (40.7%) were from the rural areas, were associated with the highest odds [OR = 1.33; 95%CI = 1.09-1.67; p = 0.004] of dengue prevention. Dengue prevention practices were also less likely to be undertaken in neighbourhoods where the responders perceived there is no and/or low density of mosquitoes. Dengue prevention practices are also less likely to be practiced by skilled workers [OR = 0.78; 95%CI = 0.63-0.95; p = 0.029] compared to those unemployed. Higher perceived susceptibility to dengue was associated with higher dengue prevention practices and participants with higher dengue knowledge were found to have a higher level of involvement in dengue prevention practices.

Conclusion: Results from the study suggest that in formulating approaches to contain dengue, strategies should be developed to cultivate dengue prevention practices among urban population and target areas with low density of mosquitoes where public perceived a less likely chance of getting dengue. Dengue prevention campaigns should focus on messages highlighting the risk of contracting dengue and education to increase knowledge about dengue.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of practice dengue prevention.
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pone.0122890.g003: Percentage of practice dengue prevention.

Mentions: Approximately all of the participants (n = 2,450; 97.5%) indicated that they clean up the surrounding house areas and 97.4% of the participants (n = 2,450) reported that they practice proper disposal of household garbage for dengue prevention. About one-fourth of participants (n = 597; 23.6%) indicated that they sleep in mosquito nets or have mosquito screens on windows. Only 11.3% of the participants (n = 283) reported that they use mosquito repellent on their body when outside the house. About one-third of participants (n = 894; 35.7%) reported that they wear bright coloured clothes to avoid mosquito bites (Fig 3).


Factors affecting dengue prevention practices: nationwide survey of the Malaysian public.

Wong LP, Shakir SM, Atefi N, AbuBakar S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Percentage of practice dengue prevention.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383514&req=5

pone.0122890.g003: Percentage of practice dengue prevention.
Mentions: Approximately all of the participants (n = 2,450; 97.5%) indicated that they clean up the surrounding house areas and 97.4% of the participants (n = 2,450) reported that they practice proper disposal of household garbage for dengue prevention. About one-fourth of participants (n = 597; 23.6%) indicated that they sleep in mosquito nets or have mosquito screens on windows. Only 11.3% of the participants (n = 283) reported that they use mosquito repellent on their body when outside the house. About one-third of participants (n = 894; 35.7%) reported that they wear bright coloured clothes to avoid mosquito bites (Fig 3).

Bottom Line: A national telephone survey was carried out with 2,512 individuals of the Malaysian public aged 18-60 years.Households of lower income of which the majority (40.7%) were from the rural areas, were associated with the highest odds [OR = 1.33; 95%CI = 1.09-1.67; p = 0.004] of dengue prevention.Dengue prevention practices are also less likely to be practiced by skilled workers [OR = 0.78; 95%CI = 0.63-0.95; p = 0.029] compared to those unemployed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Julius Centre University of Malaya (JCUM), University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Efforts to stamp dengue in many dengue endemic countries has met little success. There is a need to re-examine and understand how the public at large view the dengue prevention efforts. This study aimed to examine the demographic factors, theoretical constructs of the Health Belief Model and knowledge about dengue and how these influence the practice of dengue prevention.

Methods: A national telephone survey was carried out with 2,512 individuals of the Malaysian public aged 18-60 years.

Results: The majority (73%) of the Malaysian public had a total dengue prevention score of 51-100 (of a possible score of 1-100). Multivariate analysis suggests significant correlates of higher dengue prevention practices with demographic background, perception of susceptibility to dengue, perceived density of mosquitoes in the neighbourhood and knowledge about dengue. Households of lower income of which the majority (40.7%) were from the rural areas, were associated with the highest odds [OR = 1.33; 95%CI = 1.09-1.67; p = 0.004] of dengue prevention. Dengue prevention practices were also less likely to be undertaken in neighbourhoods where the responders perceived there is no and/or low density of mosquitoes. Dengue prevention practices are also less likely to be practiced by skilled workers [OR = 0.78; 95%CI = 0.63-0.95; p = 0.029] compared to those unemployed. Higher perceived susceptibility to dengue was associated with higher dengue prevention practices and participants with higher dengue knowledge were found to have a higher level of involvement in dengue prevention practices.

Conclusion: Results from the study suggest that in formulating approaches to contain dengue, strategies should be developed to cultivate dengue prevention practices among urban population and target areas with low density of mosquitoes where public perceived a less likely chance of getting dengue. Dengue prevention campaigns should focus on messages highlighting the risk of contracting dengue and education to increase knowledge about dengue.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus