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Insulin-like growth factor system in cancer: novel targeted therapies.

Brahmkhatri VP, Prasanna C, Atreya HS - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: These effects depend on the bioavailability of IGFs, which is regulated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs).We have attempted to expand the general viewpoint on IGF-1R, its inhibitors, potential limitations of IGF-1R, antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and IGFBP actions.This can lead to the development of novel cancer therapies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NMR Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, India.

ABSTRACT
Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are essential for growth and survival that suppress apoptosis and promote cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, and metastatic activities in various cancers. The IGFs actions are mediated through the IGF-1 receptor that is involved in cell transformation induced by tumour. These effects depend on the bioavailability of IGFs, which is regulated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). We describe here the role of the IGF system in cancer, proposing new strategies targeting this system. We have attempted to expand the general viewpoint on IGF-1R, its inhibitors, potential limitations of IGF-1R, antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and IGFBP actions. This review discusses the emerging view that blocking IGF via IGFBP is a better option than blocking IGF receptors. This can lead to the development of novel cancer therapies.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a hormone, produced by the hypothalamus which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce GH. Somatostatin secreted by the cells of hypothalamus and also by the cells of stomach, intestine, and pancreas that inhibits GH production. When pituitary secretes GH into the bloodstream, it results in the production of IGF-1 in the liver. IGF-1 is the factor that actually causes the growth of bones and other tissues of the body. It also plays an important role in signalling the pituitary to reduce GH production.
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fig2: Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a hormone, produced by the hypothalamus which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce GH. Somatostatin secreted by the cells of hypothalamus and also by the cells of stomach, intestine, and pancreas that inhibits GH production. When pituitary secretes GH into the bloodstream, it results in the production of IGF-1 in the liver. IGF-1 is the factor that actually causes the growth of bones and other tissues of the body. It also plays an important role in signalling the pituitary to reduce GH production.

Mentions: IGF functions as both a circulating hormone and as a tissue growth factor. Liver is the production house for the most circulating IGFs that are subject to both hormonal and nutritional factors. Growth hormone (GH), which is produced in the pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamic factors, stimulates IGF-1 production (Figure 2).


Insulin-like growth factor system in cancer: novel targeted therapies.

Brahmkhatri VP, Prasanna C, Atreya HS - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a hormone, produced by the hypothalamus which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce GH. Somatostatin secreted by the cells of hypothalamus and also by the cells of stomach, intestine, and pancreas that inhibits GH production. When pituitary secretes GH into the bloodstream, it results in the production of IGF-1 in the liver. IGF-1 is the factor that actually causes the growth of bones and other tissues of the body. It also plays an important role in signalling the pituitary to reduce GH production.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383470&req=5

fig2: Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a hormone, produced by the hypothalamus which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce GH. Somatostatin secreted by the cells of hypothalamus and also by the cells of stomach, intestine, and pancreas that inhibits GH production. When pituitary secretes GH into the bloodstream, it results in the production of IGF-1 in the liver. IGF-1 is the factor that actually causes the growth of bones and other tissues of the body. It also plays an important role in signalling the pituitary to reduce GH production.
Mentions: IGF functions as both a circulating hormone and as a tissue growth factor. Liver is the production house for the most circulating IGFs that are subject to both hormonal and nutritional factors. Growth hormone (GH), which is produced in the pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamic factors, stimulates IGF-1 production (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: These effects depend on the bioavailability of IGFs, which is regulated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs).We have attempted to expand the general viewpoint on IGF-1R, its inhibitors, potential limitations of IGF-1R, antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and IGFBP actions.This can lead to the development of novel cancer therapies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NMR Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, India.

ABSTRACT
Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are essential for growth and survival that suppress apoptosis and promote cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, and metastatic activities in various cancers. The IGFs actions are mediated through the IGF-1 receptor that is involved in cell transformation induced by tumour. These effects depend on the bioavailability of IGFs, which is regulated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). We describe here the role of the IGF system in cancer, proposing new strategies targeting this system. We have attempted to expand the general viewpoint on IGF-1R, its inhibitors, potential limitations of IGF-1R, antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and IGFBP actions. This review discusses the emerging view that blocking IGF via IGFBP is a better option than blocking IGF receptors. This can lead to the development of novel cancer therapies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus