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Variability in prefrontal hemodynamic response during exposure to repeated self-selected music excerpts, a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

Moghimi S, Schudlo L, Chau T, Guerguerian AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes.Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains.Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Driving the similarity index.The spatio-temporal characteristics of the hemodynamic response, recorded across regions shown in Fig. 2, were compared across four repetitions of the same musical excerpt. This figure summarizes the procedures involved in comparing these repetitions for one musical excerpt. (NIR: near infrared, PDW: phase distinction waveform (see (2))).
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pone.0122148.g003: Driving the similarity index.The spatio-temporal characteristics of the hemodynamic response, recorded across regions shown in Fig. 2, were compared across four repetitions of the same musical excerpt. This figure summarizes the procedures involved in comparing these repetitions for one musical excerpt. (NIR: near infrared, PDW: phase distinction waveform (see (2))).

Mentions: In equation (3), <.> denotes the inner product of the two waveforms, and /./ represents their Frobenius norm. The similarity index is defined for each pixel in the topographical image (represented by M). The j and k combinations correspond to the repetitions being compared, hence, there are 6 comparisons possible i.e.,. Therefore, the similarity indexes formed 6 images, referred to as similarity topographies. Each of the similarity topographies corresponded to the comparison of two repetitions of the musical excerpt, and represented the spatial and temporal similarities of the measured prefrontal hemodynamics among these repetitions. Fig. 3 depicts the steps involved in determining the similarity topographies.


Variability in prefrontal hemodynamic response during exposure to repeated self-selected music excerpts, a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

Moghimi S, Schudlo L, Chau T, Guerguerian AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Driving the similarity index.The spatio-temporal characteristics of the hemodynamic response, recorded across regions shown in Fig. 2, were compared across four repetitions of the same musical excerpt. This figure summarizes the procedures involved in comparing these repetitions for one musical excerpt. (NIR: near infrared, PDW: phase distinction waveform (see (2))).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383450&req=5

pone.0122148.g003: Driving the similarity index.The spatio-temporal characteristics of the hemodynamic response, recorded across regions shown in Fig. 2, were compared across four repetitions of the same musical excerpt. This figure summarizes the procedures involved in comparing these repetitions for one musical excerpt. (NIR: near infrared, PDW: phase distinction waveform (see (2))).
Mentions: In equation (3), <.> denotes the inner product of the two waveforms, and /./ represents their Frobenius norm. The similarity index is defined for each pixel in the topographical image (represented by M). The j and k combinations correspond to the repetitions being compared, hence, there are 6 comparisons possible i.e.,. Therefore, the similarity indexes formed 6 images, referred to as similarity topographies. Each of the similarity topographies corresponded to the comparison of two repetitions of the musical excerpt, and represented the spatial and temporal similarities of the measured prefrontal hemodynamics among these repetitions. Fig. 3 depicts the steps involved in determining the similarity topographies.

Bottom Line: Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes.Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains.Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus