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Variability in prefrontal hemodynamic response during exposure to repeated self-selected music excerpts, a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

Moghimi S, Schudlo L, Chau T, Guerguerian AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes.Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains.Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Recording layout.The layout of light sources (circles) and detectors (X's). The vertical line denotes anatomical midline. The annotated shaded areas correspond to recording locations.
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pone.0122148.g002: Recording layout.The layout of light sources (circles) and detectors (X's). The vertical line denotes anatomical midline. The annotated shaded areas correspond to recording locations.

Mentions: An Imagent Functional Brain Imaging System from ISS Inc. (Champaign, IL) was use for NIRS measurements across nine different regions on the forehead, as shown in Fig. 2. Five light sources and three photodetectors were secured to the forehead in a configuration such that each source and its neighbouring detector(s) were 3cm apart. Each source housed two lasers, emitting light at 830nm and 690nm to each location simultaneously. Only measurements obtained from sources and detectors separated by 3cm were considered, resulting in a total of nine measurement points over the anterior prefrontal cortex. The configuration was placed such that the midline was aligned with the participant’s nose and the bottom row of sources and detectors sat just above the person’s eyebrows. Each detector in the bottom row of the configuration sat approximately over the FP1 and FP2 locations of the 10–20 International System. The data were sampled at 31.25Hz. A type II third order Tchebichef low pass filter with a cut-off frequency of 0.1 Hz was used to remove high frequency artifacts such as respiration and heart rate [16]. The 830 nm and 630 nm light intensities at each of the nine recording sites were used to calculate [HbO2] and [Hb] by applying the modified Beer–Lambert law [17]. The [Hb] waveforms were used to correct motion-related noise in the [HbO2], using the method introduced by Cui et al. [18]. Further analysis was conducted based on the resulting [HbO2].


Variability in prefrontal hemodynamic response during exposure to repeated self-selected music excerpts, a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

Moghimi S, Schudlo L, Chau T, Guerguerian AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Recording layout.The layout of light sources (circles) and detectors (X's). The vertical line denotes anatomical midline. The annotated shaded areas correspond to recording locations.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383450&req=5

pone.0122148.g002: Recording layout.The layout of light sources (circles) and detectors (X's). The vertical line denotes anatomical midline. The annotated shaded areas correspond to recording locations.
Mentions: An Imagent Functional Brain Imaging System from ISS Inc. (Champaign, IL) was use for NIRS measurements across nine different regions on the forehead, as shown in Fig. 2. Five light sources and three photodetectors were secured to the forehead in a configuration such that each source and its neighbouring detector(s) were 3cm apart. Each source housed two lasers, emitting light at 830nm and 690nm to each location simultaneously. Only measurements obtained from sources and detectors separated by 3cm were considered, resulting in a total of nine measurement points over the anterior prefrontal cortex. The configuration was placed such that the midline was aligned with the participant’s nose and the bottom row of sources and detectors sat just above the person’s eyebrows. Each detector in the bottom row of the configuration sat approximately over the FP1 and FP2 locations of the 10–20 International System. The data were sampled at 31.25Hz. A type II third order Tchebichef low pass filter with a cut-off frequency of 0.1 Hz was used to remove high frequency artifacts such as respiration and heart rate [16]. The 830 nm and 630 nm light intensities at each of the nine recording sites were used to calculate [HbO2] and [Hb] by applying the modified Beer–Lambert law [17]. The [Hb] waveforms were used to correct motion-related noise in the [HbO2], using the method introduced by Cui et al. [18]. Further analysis was conducted based on the resulting [HbO2].

Bottom Line: Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes.Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains.Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Music-induced brain activity modulations in areas involved in emotion regulation may be useful in achieving therapeutic outcomes. Clinical applications of music may involve prolonged or repeated exposures to music. However, the variability of the observed brain activity patterns in repeated exposures to music is not well understood. We hypothesized that multiple exposures to the same music would elicit more consistent activity patterns than exposure to different music. In this study, the temporal and spatial variability of cerebral prefrontal hemodynamic response was investigated across multiple exposures to self-selected musical excerpts in 10 healthy adults. The hemodynamic changes were measured using prefrontal cortex near infrared spectroscopy and represented by instantaneous phase values. Based on spatial and temporal characteristics of these observed hemodynamic changes, we defined a consistency index to represent variability across these domains. The consistency index across repeated exposures to the same piece of music was compared to the consistency index corresponding to prefrontal activity from randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts. Consistency indexes were significantly different for identical versus non-identical musical excerpts when comparing a subset of repetitions. When all four exposures were compared, no significant difference was observed between the consistency indexes of randomly matched non-identical musical excerpts and the consistency index corresponding to repetitions of the same musical excerpts. This observation suggests the existence of only partial consistency between repeated exposures to the same musical excerpt, which may stem from the role of the prefrontal cortex in regulating other cognitive and emotional processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus