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Modelling the longevity of dental restorations by means of a CBR system.

Aliaga IJ, Vera V, De Paz JF, García AE, Mohamad MS - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data.This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base.In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative Dentistry, Complutense University of Madrid, Plaza Ramón y Cajal, s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The lifespan of dental restorations is limited. Longevity depends on the material used and the different characteristics of the dental piece. However, it is not always the case that the best and longest lasting material is used since patients may prefer different treatments according to how noticeable the material is. Over the last 100 years, the most commonly used material has been silver amalgam, which, while very durable, is somewhat aesthetically displeasing. Our study is based on the collection of data from the charts, notes, and radiographic information of restorative treatments performed by Dr. Vera in 1993, the analysis of the information by computer artificial intelligence to determine the most appropriate restoration, and the monitoring of the evolution of the dental restoration. The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data. This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base. In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network.

Show MeSH
(a) Posterior tooth preparation for amalgam restoration. (b) Posterior tooth restored with amalgam. (c) Posterior tooth preparation for composite restoration. (d) Posterior tooth restored with composite.
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fig1: (a) Posterior tooth preparation for amalgam restoration. (b) Posterior tooth restored with amalgam. (c) Posterior tooth preparation for composite restoration. (d) Posterior tooth restored with composite.

Mentions: The longevity of dental restorations is essentially defined by the material used, although other contributing factors include the characteristics of the cavity, the patient's personal habits, and the dentist's ability [1]. The present paper focuses on the choice of materials and the longevity of placed restorations. An analysis of the reasons for choosing a replacement will be reported in a separate article. The materials that are currently used to restore Class I and Class II cavities are amalgam and composite resin Figure 1. Generally, amalgam is most frequently used, although other materials such as composite are more aesthetically pleasing and have adhesive properties, resulting in reduced preparation size and reinforcement of the remaining dental structure [2]. Composite does not, however, have good results in certain restorations for secondary caries [3, 4]. Studies such as [5] present the factors related to the patient, operator, tooth, cavity size, and materials, although it is not possible to determine the level of relevance as indicated in the study [5]. Long-term studies have shown controversial results regarding the same items: tooth, cavity size, and cavity type. There are reports indicating that composite restorations in Class II cavities, in molars, and in large teeth have a higher potential of failure [6, 7].


Modelling the longevity of dental restorations by means of a CBR system.

Aliaga IJ, Vera V, De Paz JF, García AE, Mohamad MS - Biomed Res Int (2015)

(a) Posterior tooth preparation for amalgam restoration. (b) Posterior tooth restored with amalgam. (c) Posterior tooth preparation for composite restoration. (d) Posterior tooth restored with composite.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383434&req=5

fig1: (a) Posterior tooth preparation for amalgam restoration. (b) Posterior tooth restored with amalgam. (c) Posterior tooth preparation for composite restoration. (d) Posterior tooth restored with composite.
Mentions: The longevity of dental restorations is essentially defined by the material used, although other contributing factors include the characteristics of the cavity, the patient's personal habits, and the dentist's ability [1]. The present paper focuses on the choice of materials and the longevity of placed restorations. An analysis of the reasons for choosing a replacement will be reported in a separate article. The materials that are currently used to restore Class I and Class II cavities are amalgam and composite resin Figure 1. Generally, amalgam is most frequently used, although other materials such as composite are more aesthetically pleasing and have adhesive properties, resulting in reduced preparation size and reinforcement of the remaining dental structure [2]. Composite does not, however, have good results in certain restorations for secondary caries [3, 4]. Studies such as [5] present the factors related to the patient, operator, tooth, cavity size, and materials, although it is not possible to determine the level of relevance as indicated in the study [5]. Long-term studies have shown controversial results regarding the same items: tooth, cavity size, and cavity type. There are reports indicating that composite restorations in Class II cavities, in molars, and in large teeth have a higher potential of failure [6, 7].

Bottom Line: The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data.This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base.In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative Dentistry, Complutense University of Madrid, Plaza Ramón y Cajal, s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The lifespan of dental restorations is limited. Longevity depends on the material used and the different characteristics of the dental piece. However, it is not always the case that the best and longest lasting material is used since patients may prefer different treatments according to how noticeable the material is. Over the last 100 years, the most commonly used material has been silver amalgam, which, while very durable, is somewhat aesthetically displeasing. Our study is based on the collection of data from the charts, notes, and radiographic information of restorative treatments performed by Dr. Vera in 1993, the analysis of the information by computer artificial intelligence to determine the most appropriate restoration, and the monitoring of the evolution of the dental restoration. The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data. This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base. In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network.

Show MeSH