Limits...
The intrauterine and nursing period is a window of susceptibility for development of obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis by a high fat diet in Min/+ mice as adults.

Ngo HT, Hetland RB, Steffensen IL - J Obes (2015)

Bottom Line: We studied how obesogenic conditions during various life periods affected obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis in adult C57BL/6J-Min (multiple intestinal neoplasia)/+ mice.In the glucose tolerance test, the early exposure to a 45% fat diet in utero, during nursing, or during both in utero and nursing, did not affect blood glucose, whereas a 45% fat diet given to adults or throughout life did.The intrauterine and nursing period is a window of susceptibility for dietary fat-induced obesity and intestinal tumor development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food, Water and Cosmetics, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT
We studied how obesogenic conditions during various life periods affected obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis in adult C57BL/6J-Min (multiple intestinal neoplasia)/+ mice. The mice were given a 10% fat diet throughout life (negative control) or a 45% fat diet in utero, during nursing, during both in utero and nursing, during adult life, or during their whole life-span, and terminated at 11 weeks for tumorigenesis (Min/+) or 23 weeks for obesogenic effect (wild-type). Body weight at 11 weeks was increased after a 45% fat diet during nursing, during both in utero and nursing, and throughout life, but had normalized at 23 weeks. In the glucose tolerance test, the early exposure to a 45% fat diet in utero, during nursing, or during both in utero and nursing, did not affect blood glucose, whereas a 45% fat diet given to adults or throughout life did. However, a 45% fat diet during nursing or during in utero and nursing increased the number of small intestinal tumors. So did exposures to a 45% fat diet in adult life or throughout life, but without increasing the tumor numbers further. The intrauterine and nursing period is a window of susceptibility for dietary fat-induced obesity and intestinal tumor development.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The concentration of leptin in serum at termination was measured in both Min/+ and wild-type (+/+) mice of both genders from all the dietary groups except 10+10+45 (see explanation in the legend to Figure 1), not treated with PhIP (n = 6). Females (white columns), males (black columns).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383426&req=5

fig12: The concentration of leptin in serum at termination was measured in both Min/+ and wild-type (+/+) mice of both genders from all the dietary groups except 10+10+45 (see explanation in the legend to Figure 1), not treated with PhIP (n = 6). Females (white columns), males (black columns).

Mentions: There were no significant differences in levels of the serum hormone leptin obtained at termination between the genders of mice or between any of the dietary treatment groups (Figure 12). The only significant difference found was that the wild-type mice had significantly higher levels of leptin than the Min/+ mice. This was found based on all mice (P < 0.001), and in the dietary group of mice given a 45% fat diet both in utero and during nursing (P < 0.001).


The intrauterine and nursing period is a window of susceptibility for development of obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis by a high fat diet in Min/+ mice as adults.

Ngo HT, Hetland RB, Steffensen IL - J Obes (2015)

The concentration of leptin in serum at termination was measured in both Min/+ and wild-type (+/+) mice of both genders from all the dietary groups except 10+10+45 (see explanation in the legend to Figure 1), not treated with PhIP (n = 6). Females (white columns), males (black columns).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383426&req=5

fig12: The concentration of leptin in serum at termination was measured in both Min/+ and wild-type (+/+) mice of both genders from all the dietary groups except 10+10+45 (see explanation in the legend to Figure 1), not treated with PhIP (n = 6). Females (white columns), males (black columns).
Mentions: There were no significant differences in levels of the serum hormone leptin obtained at termination between the genders of mice or between any of the dietary treatment groups (Figure 12). The only significant difference found was that the wild-type mice had significantly higher levels of leptin than the Min/+ mice. This was found based on all mice (P < 0.001), and in the dietary group of mice given a 45% fat diet both in utero and during nursing (P < 0.001).

Bottom Line: We studied how obesogenic conditions during various life periods affected obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis in adult C57BL/6J-Min (multiple intestinal neoplasia)/+ mice.In the glucose tolerance test, the early exposure to a 45% fat diet in utero, during nursing, or during both in utero and nursing, did not affect blood glucose, whereas a 45% fat diet given to adults or throughout life did.The intrauterine and nursing period is a window of susceptibility for dietary fat-induced obesity and intestinal tumor development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food, Water and Cosmetics, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT
We studied how obesogenic conditions during various life periods affected obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis in adult C57BL/6J-Min (multiple intestinal neoplasia)/+ mice. The mice were given a 10% fat diet throughout life (negative control) or a 45% fat diet in utero, during nursing, during both in utero and nursing, during adult life, or during their whole life-span, and terminated at 11 weeks for tumorigenesis (Min/+) or 23 weeks for obesogenic effect (wild-type). Body weight at 11 weeks was increased after a 45% fat diet during nursing, during both in utero and nursing, and throughout life, but had normalized at 23 weeks. In the glucose tolerance test, the early exposure to a 45% fat diet in utero, during nursing, or during both in utero and nursing, did not affect blood glucose, whereas a 45% fat diet given to adults or throughout life did. However, a 45% fat diet during nursing or during in utero and nursing increased the number of small intestinal tumors. So did exposures to a 45% fat diet in adult life or throughout life, but without increasing the tumor numbers further. The intrauterine and nursing period is a window of susceptibility for dietary fat-induced obesity and intestinal tumor development.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus