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Autistic-like traits in adult patients with mood disorders and schizophrenia.

Matsuo J, Kamio Y, Takahashi H, Ota M, Teraishi T, Hori H, Nagashima A, Takei R, Higuchi T, Motohashi N, Kunugi H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms.Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity.These findings suggest the importance of evaluating autistic-like traits/symptoms underlying adult-onset psychiatric disorders for the best-suited treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mental Disorder Research, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Neuropsychiatry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Chuo, Yamanashi, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and whether such an association is independent of symptom severity. The subjects were 290 adults of normal intelligence between 25 and 59 years of age (MDD, n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia, n=44; healthy controls, n=65). Autistic-like traits/symptoms were measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults. Symptom severity was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and/or the Young Mania Rating Scale. Almost half of the clinical subjects, except those with remitted MDD, exhibited autistic-like traits/symptoms at levels typical for sub-threshold or threshold autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the proportion of psychiatric patients that demonstrated high autistic-like traits/symptoms was significantly greater than that of healthy controls, and not different between that of remitted or unremitted subjects with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms. A substantial proportion of adults with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed high autistic-like traits/symptoms independent of symptom severity, suggesting a shared pathophysiology among autism spectrum disorder and these psychiatric disorders. Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity. These findings suggest the importance of evaluating autistic-like traits/symptoms underlying adult-onset psychiatric disorders for the best-suited treatment. Further studies with a prospective design and larger samples are needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plots of SRS-A total raw score and symptom severity.Significant correlation was found between the SRS-A and HDRS-17 total in the MDD group (r = 0.32, p<0.001), but not in the BPD group (r = 0.16, n.s.). No correlation was found between the SRS-A and PANSS total in the SZ group (r = 0.25, n.s.).
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pone.0122711.g003: Scatter plots of SRS-A total raw score and symptom severity.Significant correlation was found between the SRS-A and HDRS-17 total in the MDD group (r = 0.32, p<0.001), but not in the BPD group (r = 0.16, n.s.). No correlation was found between the SRS-A and PANSS total in the SZ group (r = 0.25, n.s.).

Mentions: In the MDD group, including remitted and unremitted subjects, SRS-A raw scores were moderately correlated with HDRS-17 total score (r = 0.32, p<0.001). On the contrary, no significant correlations between the SRS-A and HDRS-17 total scores were found for the BPD group, or between the SRS-A and PANSS total scores for the SZ group. Scatter plots are shown for the MDD, BPD, and SZ groups (Fig 3).


Autistic-like traits in adult patients with mood disorders and schizophrenia.

Matsuo J, Kamio Y, Takahashi H, Ota M, Teraishi T, Hori H, Nagashima A, Takei R, Higuchi T, Motohashi N, Kunugi H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Scatter plots of SRS-A total raw score and symptom severity.Significant correlation was found between the SRS-A and HDRS-17 total in the MDD group (r = 0.32, p<0.001), but not in the BPD group (r = 0.16, n.s.). No correlation was found between the SRS-A and PANSS total in the SZ group (r = 0.25, n.s.).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383414&req=5

pone.0122711.g003: Scatter plots of SRS-A total raw score and symptom severity.Significant correlation was found between the SRS-A and HDRS-17 total in the MDD group (r = 0.32, p<0.001), but not in the BPD group (r = 0.16, n.s.). No correlation was found between the SRS-A and PANSS total in the SZ group (r = 0.25, n.s.).
Mentions: In the MDD group, including remitted and unremitted subjects, SRS-A raw scores were moderately correlated with HDRS-17 total score (r = 0.32, p<0.001). On the contrary, no significant correlations between the SRS-A and HDRS-17 total scores were found for the BPD group, or between the SRS-A and PANSS total scores for the SZ group. Scatter plots are shown for the MDD, BPD, and SZ groups (Fig 3).

Bottom Line: On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms.Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity.These findings suggest the importance of evaluating autistic-like traits/symptoms underlying adult-onset psychiatric disorders for the best-suited treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mental Disorder Research, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Neuropsychiatry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Chuo, Yamanashi, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and whether such an association is independent of symptom severity. The subjects were 290 adults of normal intelligence between 25 and 59 years of age (MDD, n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia, n=44; healthy controls, n=65). Autistic-like traits/symptoms were measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults. Symptom severity was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and/or the Young Mania Rating Scale. Almost half of the clinical subjects, except those with remitted MDD, exhibited autistic-like traits/symptoms at levels typical for sub-threshold or threshold autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the proportion of psychiatric patients that demonstrated high autistic-like traits/symptoms was significantly greater than that of healthy controls, and not different between that of remitted or unremitted subjects with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms. A substantial proportion of adults with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed high autistic-like traits/symptoms independent of symptom severity, suggesting a shared pathophysiology among autism spectrum disorder and these psychiatric disorders. Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity. These findings suggest the importance of evaluating autistic-like traits/symptoms underlying adult-onset psychiatric disorders for the best-suited treatment. Further studies with a prospective design and larger samples are needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus