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Classical olfactory conditioning in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

Liu JL, Chen XY, Zeng XN - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Control effect may be influenced by learning, which could modify the olfactory response of the fly to this attractant.The acquisition of the proboscis extension reflex was used as the criterion for conditioning.A high conditioned response level was found in oriental fruit flies when an odor was presented in paired association with a sucrose reward but not when the odor and sucrose were presented unpaired.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Natural Pesticide and Chemical Biology of the Ministry of Education, College of Natural Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.

ABSTRACT
The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a serious pest of fruits and vegetables. Methyl eugenol (ME), a male attractant, is used to against this fly by mass trapping. Control effect may be influenced by learning, which could modify the olfactory response of the fly to this attractant. To collect the behavioral evidence, studies on the capability of this fly for olfactory learning are necessary. We investigated olfactory learning in male flies with a classical olfactory conditioning procedure using restrained individuals under laboratory conditions. The acquisition of the proboscis extension reflex was used as the criterion for conditioning. A high conditioned response level was found in oriental fruit flies when an odor was presented in paired association with a sucrose reward but not when the odor and sucrose were presented unpaired. We also found that the conditioning performance was influenced by the odor concentration, intertrial interval, and starvation time. A slight sensitization elicited by imbibing sucrose was observed. These results indicate that oriental fruit flies have a high capacity to form an olfactory memory as a result of classical conditioning.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of starvation on conditioning.Percentage of B. dorsalis starved for 1, 12, 18, and 24 h showed conditioned response (% Conditioned response) to the CS in 6 trials (n = 58, 61, 58, and 24, respectively). Different letters indicate significant pairwise differences in learning performance (Scheffé test after the Kruskal-Wallis test).
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pone.0122155.g006: Effects of starvation on conditioning.Percentage of B. dorsalis starved for 1, 12, 18, and 24 h showed conditioned response (% Conditioned response) to the CS in 6 trials (n = 58, 61, 58, and 24, respectively). Different letters indicate significant pairwise differences in learning performance (Scheffé test after the Kruskal-Wallis test).

Mentions: We assessed whether the PER conditioning was also affected by the starvation time. There was a significant increase in the frequency of conditioned response over the five successive trials after flies were starved for 12, 18, or 24 h (12 h: Q = 33.81; 18 h: Q = 16.79; 24 h: Q = 25.71; all df = 4, p < 0.01; Fig 6), and the maximum rate was 57.4, 77.6, and 76.8%, respectively, at the fifth trial in the 12-h group and the fourth trial in the 18-h and 24-h groups. The 1-h group showed response rates lower than 10% in trials 2 through 6 that did not increase significantly during training (Q = 7.23, df = 4, p = 0.12).


Classical olfactory conditioning in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

Liu JL, Chen XY, Zeng XN - PLoS ONE (2015)

Effects of starvation on conditioning.Percentage of B. dorsalis starved for 1, 12, 18, and 24 h showed conditioned response (% Conditioned response) to the CS in 6 trials (n = 58, 61, 58, and 24, respectively). Different letters indicate significant pairwise differences in learning performance (Scheffé test after the Kruskal-Wallis test).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383412&req=5

pone.0122155.g006: Effects of starvation on conditioning.Percentage of B. dorsalis starved for 1, 12, 18, and 24 h showed conditioned response (% Conditioned response) to the CS in 6 trials (n = 58, 61, 58, and 24, respectively). Different letters indicate significant pairwise differences in learning performance (Scheffé test after the Kruskal-Wallis test).
Mentions: We assessed whether the PER conditioning was also affected by the starvation time. There was a significant increase in the frequency of conditioned response over the five successive trials after flies were starved for 12, 18, or 24 h (12 h: Q = 33.81; 18 h: Q = 16.79; 24 h: Q = 25.71; all df = 4, p < 0.01; Fig 6), and the maximum rate was 57.4, 77.6, and 76.8%, respectively, at the fifth trial in the 12-h group and the fourth trial in the 18-h and 24-h groups. The 1-h group showed response rates lower than 10% in trials 2 through 6 that did not increase significantly during training (Q = 7.23, df = 4, p = 0.12).

Bottom Line: Control effect may be influenced by learning, which could modify the olfactory response of the fly to this attractant.The acquisition of the proboscis extension reflex was used as the criterion for conditioning.A high conditioned response level was found in oriental fruit flies when an odor was presented in paired association with a sucrose reward but not when the odor and sucrose were presented unpaired.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Natural Pesticide and Chemical Biology of the Ministry of Education, College of Natural Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.

ABSTRACT
The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a serious pest of fruits and vegetables. Methyl eugenol (ME), a male attractant, is used to against this fly by mass trapping. Control effect may be influenced by learning, which could modify the olfactory response of the fly to this attractant. To collect the behavioral evidence, studies on the capability of this fly for olfactory learning are necessary. We investigated olfactory learning in male flies with a classical olfactory conditioning procedure using restrained individuals under laboratory conditions. The acquisition of the proboscis extension reflex was used as the criterion for conditioning. A high conditioned response level was found in oriental fruit flies when an odor was presented in paired association with a sucrose reward but not when the odor and sucrose were presented unpaired. We also found that the conditioning performance was influenced by the odor concentration, intertrial interval, and starvation time. A slight sensitization elicited by imbibing sucrose was observed. These results indicate that oriental fruit flies have a high capacity to form an olfactory memory as a result of classical conditioning.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus