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Therapeutically interchangeable? A study of real-world outcomes associated with switching basal insulin analogues among US patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using electronic medical records data.

Levin P, Wei W, Miao R, Ye F, Xie L, Baser O, Gill J - Diabetes Obes Metab (2014)

Bottom Line: In cohort 2, overall, there were contrasting findings between patients in the GLA-S and those in the DET-C subgroup.This study showed contrasting results when patients with T2DM switched between basal insulin analogues, although these preliminary results may be subject to limitations in the analysis.Nevertheless, this study calls into question the therapeutic interchangeability of GLA and DET, and this merits further investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Model Clinical Research, Baltimore, MD, USA.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Patients requiring rapid-acting insulin (RAI). DET, insulin detemir; GLA, insulin glargine; DET-S, patients previously treated with GLA who switched to DET; GLA-C, patients who remained on GLA; GLA-S, patients previously treated with DET who switched to GLA; DET-C, patients who remained on DET.
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fig02: Patients requiring rapid-acting insulin (RAI). DET, insulin detemir; GLA, insulin glargine; DET-S, patients previously treated with GLA who switched to DET; GLA-C, patients who remained on GLA; GLA-S, patients previously treated with DET who switched to GLA; DET-C, patients who remained on DET.

Mentions: In cohort 1, the use of rapid-acting insulin was significantly higher among the patients in the DET-S subgroup than among those in the GLA-C subgroup (57.6 vs. 52.5%; p < 0.0001; Figure 2), and 26.9% of patients in the DET-S subgroup restarted GLA. In cohort 2, however, similar proportions of patients used rapid-acting insulin in the DET-C and GLA-S subgroups (50.4 vs. 51.1%; p = 0.712), and 18.6% of patients in the GLA-S subgroup restarted DET.


Therapeutically interchangeable? A study of real-world outcomes associated with switching basal insulin analogues among US patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using electronic medical records data.

Levin P, Wei W, Miao R, Ye F, Xie L, Baser O, Gill J - Diabetes Obes Metab (2014)

Patients requiring rapid-acting insulin (RAI). DET, insulin detemir; GLA, insulin glargine; DET-S, patients previously treated with GLA who switched to DET; GLA-C, patients who remained on GLA; GLA-S, patients previously treated with DET who switched to GLA; DET-C, patients who remained on DET.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383352&req=5

fig02: Patients requiring rapid-acting insulin (RAI). DET, insulin detemir; GLA, insulin glargine; DET-S, patients previously treated with GLA who switched to DET; GLA-C, patients who remained on GLA; GLA-S, patients previously treated with DET who switched to GLA; DET-C, patients who remained on DET.
Mentions: In cohort 1, the use of rapid-acting insulin was significantly higher among the patients in the DET-S subgroup than among those in the GLA-C subgroup (57.6 vs. 52.5%; p < 0.0001; Figure 2), and 26.9% of patients in the DET-S subgroup restarted GLA. In cohort 2, however, similar proportions of patients used rapid-acting insulin in the DET-C and GLA-S subgroups (50.4 vs. 51.1%; p = 0.712), and 18.6% of patients in the GLA-S subgroup restarted DET.

Bottom Line: In cohort 2, overall, there were contrasting findings between patients in the GLA-S and those in the DET-C subgroup.This study showed contrasting results when patients with T2DM switched between basal insulin analogues, although these preliminary results may be subject to limitations in the analysis.Nevertheless, this study calls into question the therapeutic interchangeability of GLA and DET, and this merits further investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Model Clinical Research, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus