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Sweetpotato- and cereal-based infant foods: protein quality assessment, and effect on body composition using sprague dawley rats as a model.

Amagloh FK, Chiridza T, Lemercier ME, Broomfield A, Morel PC, Coad J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The true protein digestibility score for Cerelac was 96.27%, and about 1.8% (P<0.0001) higher than that for OFSP ComFa, CFSP ComFa and Weanimix.However, OFSP ComFa had the highest un-truncated PDCAAS by a difference of 4.1%, than CFSP ComFa, and about 20% difference compared with both the Weanimix and Cerelac.All the products investigated had PDCAAS greater than 70%, the minimum protein quality requirement for complementary foods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Processing and Technology Unit, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture, University for Development Studies, Nyankpala, Ghana.

ABSTRACT
The Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score (PDCAAS) of sweetpotato-based complementary foods (OFSP ComFa and CFSP ComFa) and cereal-based infant products (Weanimix and Cerelac) was assessed using 3 wk-old male Sprague Dawley rats weighing between 53-67 g as a model for human infants. Also, the effect of consumption of the infant formulations on lean mass, bone mass content and fat mass was evaluated by Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) using 6 wk-old Sprague Dawley rats (initial weight, 206-229 g). The ComFa products and Weanimix are household-level formulations, and Cerelac is a commercial infant cereal. The true protein digestibility score for Cerelac was 96.27%, and about 1.8% (P<0.0001) higher than that for OFSP ComFa, CFSP ComFa and Weanimix. However, OFSP ComFa had the highest un-truncated PDCAAS by a difference of 4.1%, than CFSP ComFa, and about 20% difference compared with both the Weanimix and Cerelac. All the products investigated had PDCAAS greater than 70%, the minimum protein quality requirement for complementary foods. Among the rats assigned to the four formulations, their bone mass and fat mass composition were not significantly different (P=0.08 and P=0.85, respectively). However, the rats on CFSP ComFa had higher lean mass than those on Cerelac (321.67 vs. 297.19 g; P=0.03). The findings from the PDCAAS and the DEXA-measured body composition studies indicate that complementary foods could be formulated from readily available agricultural resources at the household-level to support growth as would a nutritionally adequate industrial-manufactured infant cereal. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the findings of our studies are based on an animal model.

No MeSH data available.


Total food intake for 21 d by experimental groups (Expt 2).Bars represent group means and standard deviations for total food intake. Bars that do not share the same letter (a-c) are significantly different.
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pone.0120121.g002: Total food intake for 21 d by experimental groups (Expt 2).Bars represent group means and standard deviations for total food intake. Bars that do not share the same letter (a-c) are significantly different.

Mentions: The initial body weight of the groups were as follows: 216.82 g (OFSP ComFa), 218.66 g (CFSP ComFa), 216.05 g (Weanimix), and 215.42 g (Cerelac), and were not significantly different (P = 0.89). The initial body weight met the minimum recommended weight of 200 g suggested by Bertin et al [13] for obtaining reliable data of rats that are scanned on DEXA. All the groups gained an average weight of 156.46 g with no significant difference (P = 0.73) between them, although the total food intake differed (P<0.0001) between some of the groups (Fig 2). The OFSP ComFa group had the highest food intake and was not significantly different from the CFSP ComFa group (499.36 vs. 495.30; P>0.05). The total food intake by the Weanimix group was the lowest and not significantly different from the Cerelac group (479.11 vs. 485.69 g; P>0.05) (Fig 2).


Sweetpotato- and cereal-based infant foods: protein quality assessment, and effect on body composition using sprague dawley rats as a model.

Amagloh FK, Chiridza T, Lemercier ME, Broomfield A, Morel PC, Coad J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Total food intake for 21 d by experimental groups (Expt 2).Bars represent group means and standard deviations for total food intake. Bars that do not share the same letter (a-c) are significantly different.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383327&req=5

pone.0120121.g002: Total food intake for 21 d by experimental groups (Expt 2).Bars represent group means and standard deviations for total food intake. Bars that do not share the same letter (a-c) are significantly different.
Mentions: The initial body weight of the groups were as follows: 216.82 g (OFSP ComFa), 218.66 g (CFSP ComFa), 216.05 g (Weanimix), and 215.42 g (Cerelac), and were not significantly different (P = 0.89). The initial body weight met the minimum recommended weight of 200 g suggested by Bertin et al [13] for obtaining reliable data of rats that are scanned on DEXA. All the groups gained an average weight of 156.46 g with no significant difference (P = 0.73) between them, although the total food intake differed (P<0.0001) between some of the groups (Fig 2). The OFSP ComFa group had the highest food intake and was not significantly different from the CFSP ComFa group (499.36 vs. 495.30; P>0.05). The total food intake by the Weanimix group was the lowest and not significantly different from the Cerelac group (479.11 vs. 485.69 g; P>0.05) (Fig 2).

Bottom Line: The true protein digestibility score for Cerelac was 96.27%, and about 1.8% (P<0.0001) higher than that for OFSP ComFa, CFSP ComFa and Weanimix.However, OFSP ComFa had the highest un-truncated PDCAAS by a difference of 4.1%, than CFSP ComFa, and about 20% difference compared with both the Weanimix and Cerelac.All the products investigated had PDCAAS greater than 70%, the minimum protein quality requirement for complementary foods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Food Processing and Technology Unit, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture, University for Development Studies, Nyankpala, Ghana.

ABSTRACT
The Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score (PDCAAS) of sweetpotato-based complementary foods (OFSP ComFa and CFSP ComFa) and cereal-based infant products (Weanimix and Cerelac) was assessed using 3 wk-old male Sprague Dawley rats weighing between 53-67 g as a model for human infants. Also, the effect of consumption of the infant formulations on lean mass, bone mass content and fat mass was evaluated by Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) using 6 wk-old Sprague Dawley rats (initial weight, 206-229 g). The ComFa products and Weanimix are household-level formulations, and Cerelac is a commercial infant cereal. The true protein digestibility score for Cerelac was 96.27%, and about 1.8% (P<0.0001) higher than that for OFSP ComFa, CFSP ComFa and Weanimix. However, OFSP ComFa had the highest un-truncated PDCAAS by a difference of 4.1%, than CFSP ComFa, and about 20% difference compared with both the Weanimix and Cerelac. All the products investigated had PDCAAS greater than 70%, the minimum protein quality requirement for complementary foods. Among the rats assigned to the four formulations, their bone mass and fat mass composition were not significantly different (P=0.08 and P=0.85, respectively). However, the rats on CFSP ComFa had higher lean mass than those on Cerelac (321.67 vs. 297.19 g; P=0.03). The findings from the PDCAAS and the DEXA-measured body composition studies indicate that complementary foods could be formulated from readily available agricultural resources at the household-level to support growth as would a nutritionally adequate industrial-manufactured infant cereal. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the findings of our studies are based on an animal model.

No MeSH data available.