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Effects of verapamil SR and atenolol on 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate in hypertension patients with coronary artery disease: an international verapamil SR-trandolapril ambulatory monitoring substudy.

Denardo SJ, Gong Y, Cooper-DeHoff RM, Farsang C, Keltai M, Szirmai L, Messerli FH, Bavry AA, Handberg EM, Mancia G, Pepine CJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00133692.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00133692.

No MeSH data available.


Twenty-four-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate by strategy, both at baseline and after 1 year of treatment.Individual data points represent mean values. Nighttime dipping was determined over the time interval 20:00–02:00 and morning surge over the interval 02:00–10:00.
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pone.0122726.g004: Twenty-four-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate by strategy, both at baseline and after 1 year of treatment.Individual data points represent mean values. Nighttime dipping was determined over the time interval 20:00–02:00 and morning surge over the interval 02:00–10:00.

Mentions: After 1-year of treatment, both verapamil SR- and atenolol-based strategies similarly decreased ambulatory BP vs. baseline, and this decrease persisted throughout 24 hours for each strategy (P<0.0001 for SBP and DBP from the repeated measure analysis; Figs 2 and 4). Additionally, there was a corresponding decrease in the 24-hour area under the BP curve for both strategies (verapamil SR: 2990/1733 vs. 2854/1673 mmHg hr, P = 0.011 and 0.034, respectively; atenolol: 3059/1765 vs. 2895/1691 mmHg hr, P = 0.0016 and 0.067, respectively). Moreover, after treatment, HR was consistently decreased among atenolol patients (P<0.0001 from the repeated measure analysis; Figs 2 and 4; area under HR curve: 1615 vs. 1498 beats hr/min, P = 0.0028) but unchanged among verapamil SR patients (P = 0.49; 1685 vs. 1667 beats hr/min, P = 0.49). Interestingly, pulse pressure at baseline was relatively low for each strategy and decreased for both after 1 year of treatment (verapamil SR: 55.5 vs. 51.8 mmHg, P = 0.022; atenolol: 56.6 vs. 52.5 mmHg, P = 0.010).


Effects of verapamil SR and atenolol on 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate in hypertension patients with coronary artery disease: an international verapamil SR-trandolapril ambulatory monitoring substudy.

Denardo SJ, Gong Y, Cooper-DeHoff RM, Farsang C, Keltai M, Szirmai L, Messerli FH, Bavry AA, Handberg EM, Mancia G, Pepine CJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Twenty-four-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate by strategy, both at baseline and after 1 year of treatment.Individual data points represent mean values. Nighttime dipping was determined over the time interval 20:00–02:00 and morning surge over the interval 02:00–10:00.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383326&req=5

pone.0122726.g004: Twenty-four-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate by strategy, both at baseline and after 1 year of treatment.Individual data points represent mean values. Nighttime dipping was determined over the time interval 20:00–02:00 and morning surge over the interval 02:00–10:00.
Mentions: After 1-year of treatment, both verapamil SR- and atenolol-based strategies similarly decreased ambulatory BP vs. baseline, and this decrease persisted throughout 24 hours for each strategy (P<0.0001 for SBP and DBP from the repeated measure analysis; Figs 2 and 4). Additionally, there was a corresponding decrease in the 24-hour area under the BP curve for both strategies (verapamil SR: 2990/1733 vs. 2854/1673 mmHg hr, P = 0.011 and 0.034, respectively; atenolol: 3059/1765 vs. 2895/1691 mmHg hr, P = 0.0016 and 0.067, respectively). Moreover, after treatment, HR was consistently decreased among atenolol patients (P<0.0001 from the repeated measure analysis; Figs 2 and 4; area under HR curve: 1615 vs. 1498 beats hr/min, P = 0.0028) but unchanged among verapamil SR patients (P = 0.49; 1685 vs. 1667 beats hr/min, P = 0.49). Interestingly, pulse pressure at baseline was relatively low for each strategy and decreased for both after 1 year of treatment (verapamil SR: 55.5 vs. 51.8 mmHg, P = 0.022; atenolol: 56.6 vs. 52.5 mmHg, P = 0.010).

Bottom Line: Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00133692.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00133692.

No MeSH data available.