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Effects of verapamil SR and atenolol on 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate in hypertension patients with coronary artery disease: an international verapamil SR-trandolapril ambulatory monitoring substudy.

Denardo SJ, Gong Y, Cooper-DeHoff RM, Farsang C, Keltai M, Szirmai L, Messerli FH, Bavry AA, Handberg EM, Mancia G, Pepine CJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00133692.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00133692.

No MeSH data available.


Office-based systolic and diastolic blood pressure based upon treatment strategy among 423 frequency-matched INVEST patients who did not have ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.The minimum P values were 0.12 and 0.09, respectively.
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pone.0122726.g003: Office-based systolic and diastolic blood pressure based upon treatment strategy among 423 frequency-matched INVEST patients who did not have ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.The minimum P values were 0.12 and 0.09, respectively.

Mentions: However, several clinical characteristics of the ambulatory monitoring patients, as a group, differed significantly from the remaining, non-ambulatory monitoring INVEST patients (Table 1). The ambulatory monitoring patients were slightly younger and less obese but had a higher prevalence of other comorbidities (e.g., MI, left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, and hypercholesterolemia) compared with remaining INVEST patients. To explore whether the difference in characteristics affected applicability of the subgroup analysis to the remaining INVEST patients, we created a 3:1 frequency-matched patient dataset (N = 423) for the ambulatory monitoring patients, using the remaining INVEST patients as the source. This dataset was based upon age (decades), gender, and maximized a match for the remaining 23 characteristics. The total number of characteristics successfully matched was 14/25. Using this dataset, we then compared the office BP by treatment strategy throughout the study visits spanning 48 months and found no statistical difference based on treatment strategy (all P values >0.05) (Fig 3). Therefore, it seems that there was no significant selection bias into the subgroup analysis and that the results of the subgroup analysis should be reasonably applicable to the remaining INVEST patients.


Effects of verapamil SR and atenolol on 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate in hypertension patients with coronary artery disease: an international verapamil SR-trandolapril ambulatory monitoring substudy.

Denardo SJ, Gong Y, Cooper-DeHoff RM, Farsang C, Keltai M, Szirmai L, Messerli FH, Bavry AA, Handberg EM, Mancia G, Pepine CJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Office-based systolic and diastolic blood pressure based upon treatment strategy among 423 frequency-matched INVEST patients who did not have ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.The minimum P values were 0.12 and 0.09, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383326&req=5

pone.0122726.g003: Office-based systolic and diastolic blood pressure based upon treatment strategy among 423 frequency-matched INVEST patients who did not have ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.The minimum P values were 0.12 and 0.09, respectively.
Mentions: However, several clinical characteristics of the ambulatory monitoring patients, as a group, differed significantly from the remaining, non-ambulatory monitoring INVEST patients (Table 1). The ambulatory monitoring patients were slightly younger and less obese but had a higher prevalence of other comorbidities (e.g., MI, left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, and hypercholesterolemia) compared with remaining INVEST patients. To explore whether the difference in characteristics affected applicability of the subgroup analysis to the remaining INVEST patients, we created a 3:1 frequency-matched patient dataset (N = 423) for the ambulatory monitoring patients, using the remaining INVEST patients as the source. This dataset was based upon age (decades), gender, and maximized a match for the remaining 23 characteristics. The total number of characteristics successfully matched was 14/25. Using this dataset, we then compared the office BP by treatment strategy throughout the study visits spanning 48 months and found no statistical difference based on treatment strategy (all P values >0.05) (Fig 3). Therefore, it seems that there was no significant selection bias into the subgroup analysis and that the results of the subgroup analysis should be reasonably applicable to the remaining INVEST patients.

Bottom Line: Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00133692.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00133692.

No MeSH data available.