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Physiological and selective attention demands during an international rally motor sport event.

Turner AP, Richards H - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: In ambient temperatures of 20.1°C (in-car peak 33.9°C) mean (SD) peak HR and T core were significantly elevated (P < 0.05) during rally compared to reconnaissance (166 (17) versus 111 (16) beats · min(-1) and 38.5 (0.4) versus 37.6 (0.2)°C, resp.).Environmental and physical demands during rally competition produced significant physiological responses.Challenges to thermoregulation, hydration status, and cognitive function need to be addressed to minimise potentially negative effects on performance and safety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Sport, PE & Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 8AQ, UK.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To monitor physiological and attention responses of drivers and codrivers during a World Rally Championship (WRC) event.

Methods: Observational data were collected from ten male drivers/codrivers on heart rate (HR), core body (T core) and skin temperature (T sk), hydration status (urine osmolality), fluid intake (self-report), and visual and auditory selective attention (performance tests). Measures were taken pre-, mid-, and postcompetition day and also during the precompetition reconnaissance.

Results: In ambient temperatures of 20.1°C (in-car peak 33.9°C) mean (SD) peak HR and T core were significantly elevated (P < 0.05) during rally compared to reconnaissance (166 (17) versus 111 (16) beats · min(-1) and 38.5 (0.4) versus 37.6 (0.2)°C, resp.). Values during competitive stages were substantially higher in drivers. High urine osmolality was indicated in some drivers within competition. Attention was maintained during the event but was significantly lower prerally, though with considerable individual variation.

Conclusions: Environmental and physical demands during rally competition produced significant physiological responses. Challenges to thermoregulation, hydration status, and cognitive function need to be addressed to minimise potentially negative effects on performance and safety.

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Mean (SD) values for urine osmolality of drivers and codrivers for the first morning sample (pre), during the day (mid) and at the end of one day of the reconnaissance (recce-hashed boxes) and then one day of the rally competition (solid black boxes). *Significantly lower than postreconnaissance (P = 0.01).
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fig2: Mean (SD) values for urine osmolality of drivers and codrivers for the first morning sample (pre), during the day (mid) and at the end of one day of the reconnaissance (recce-hashed boxes) and then one day of the rally competition (solid black boxes). *Significantly lower than postreconnaissance (P = 0.01).

Mentions: Uosm data showed a significant main effect of time (P = 0.01, r = 0.62), although with large within participant (across time points) and between participant variations (Figure 2). The only significant increase was from mid- to postreconnaissance (P = 0.01), with other changes not significant (P = 0.44–1.0). Descriptive analysis shows 42% of driver samples at >700 mOsmol·kgH2O−1 (including two morning samples from the same participant >1000 mOsmol·kgH2O−1) compared to just 9% of codriver samples. Contrast case analysis across all measurements for the driver subgroup showed that the individual performer with highest Uosm drank the least volume on reconnaissance (2 L) and second least on rally (5.5 L) compared to the rest of the driver subgroup, and less than the whole group average for each day. In contrast the driver with lowest Uosm drank the second highest amount on reconnaissance (3.15 L) and most on rally (7.5 L) for the driver subgroup. Fluid intake for the whole group ranged from 1.75–4.75 L during the reconnaissance (8 h—equivalent to 0.39 L·h−1) and from 3–8.5 L during the rally (11 h—equivalent to 0.54 L·h−1).


Physiological and selective attention demands during an international rally motor sport event.

Turner AP, Richards H - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Mean (SD) values for urine osmolality of drivers and codrivers for the first morning sample (pre), during the day (mid) and at the end of one day of the reconnaissance (recce-hashed boxes) and then one day of the rally competition (solid black boxes). *Significantly lower than postreconnaissance (P = 0.01).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383274&req=5

fig2: Mean (SD) values for urine osmolality of drivers and codrivers for the first morning sample (pre), during the day (mid) and at the end of one day of the reconnaissance (recce-hashed boxes) and then one day of the rally competition (solid black boxes). *Significantly lower than postreconnaissance (P = 0.01).
Mentions: Uosm data showed a significant main effect of time (P = 0.01, r = 0.62), although with large within participant (across time points) and between participant variations (Figure 2). The only significant increase was from mid- to postreconnaissance (P = 0.01), with other changes not significant (P = 0.44–1.0). Descriptive analysis shows 42% of driver samples at >700 mOsmol·kgH2O−1 (including two morning samples from the same participant >1000 mOsmol·kgH2O−1) compared to just 9% of codriver samples. Contrast case analysis across all measurements for the driver subgroup showed that the individual performer with highest Uosm drank the least volume on reconnaissance (2 L) and second least on rally (5.5 L) compared to the rest of the driver subgroup, and less than the whole group average for each day. In contrast the driver with lowest Uosm drank the second highest amount on reconnaissance (3.15 L) and most on rally (7.5 L) for the driver subgroup. Fluid intake for the whole group ranged from 1.75–4.75 L during the reconnaissance (8 h—equivalent to 0.39 L·h−1) and from 3–8.5 L during the rally (11 h—equivalent to 0.54 L·h−1).

Bottom Line: In ambient temperatures of 20.1°C (in-car peak 33.9°C) mean (SD) peak HR and T core were significantly elevated (P < 0.05) during rally compared to reconnaissance (166 (17) versus 111 (16) beats · min(-1) and 38.5 (0.4) versus 37.6 (0.2)°C, resp.).Environmental and physical demands during rally competition produced significant physiological responses.Challenges to thermoregulation, hydration status, and cognitive function need to be addressed to minimise potentially negative effects on performance and safety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Sport, PE & Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 8AQ, UK.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To monitor physiological and attention responses of drivers and codrivers during a World Rally Championship (WRC) event.

Methods: Observational data were collected from ten male drivers/codrivers on heart rate (HR), core body (T core) and skin temperature (T sk), hydration status (urine osmolality), fluid intake (self-report), and visual and auditory selective attention (performance tests). Measures were taken pre-, mid-, and postcompetition day and also during the precompetition reconnaissance.

Results: In ambient temperatures of 20.1°C (in-car peak 33.9°C) mean (SD) peak HR and T core were significantly elevated (P < 0.05) during rally compared to reconnaissance (166 (17) versus 111 (16) beats · min(-1) and 38.5 (0.4) versus 37.6 (0.2)°C, resp.). Values during competitive stages were substantially higher in drivers. High urine osmolality was indicated in some drivers within competition. Attention was maintained during the event but was significantly lower prerally, though with considerable individual variation.

Conclusions: Environmental and physical demands during rally competition produced significant physiological responses. Challenges to thermoregulation, hydration status, and cognitive function need to be addressed to minimise potentially negative effects on performance and safety.

Show MeSH