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A Rapid and Accurate Extraction Procedure for Analysing Free Amino Acids in Meat Samples by GC-MS.

Pérez-Palacios T, Barroso MA, Ruiz J, Antequera T - Int J Anal Chem (2015)

Bottom Line: It also showed a low limit of detection and quantification (3.8 · 10(-4)-6.6 · 10(-4) μg μL(-1) and 1.3 · 10(-3)-2.2 · 10(-2) μg μL(-1), resp.) for most amino acids, an adequate precision (2.15-20.15% for run-to-run), and a linear response for all amino acids (R (2) = 0.741-0.998) in the range of 1-100 µg mL(-1).Moreover, it takes less time and requires lower amount of sample and solvent than conventional techniques.Thus, this is a cost and time efficient tool for homogenizing in the extraction procedure of free amino acids from meat samples, being an adequate option for routine analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Production and Food Science, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, University of Extremadura, Avenida de la Universidad s/n, 10003 Cáceres, Spain.

ABSTRACT
This study evaluated the use of a mixer mill as the homogenization tool for the extraction of free amino acids in meat samples, with the main goal of analyzing a large number of samples in the shortest time and minimizing sample amount and solvent volume. Ground samples (0.2 g) were mixed with 1.5 mL HCl 0.1 M and homogenized in the mixer mill. The final biphasic system was separated by centrifugation. The supernatant was deproteinized, derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography. This procedure showed a high extracting ability, especially in samples with high free amino acid content (recovery = 88.73-104.94%). It also showed a low limit of detection and quantification (3.8 · 10(-4)-6.6 · 10(-4) μg μL(-1) and 1.3 · 10(-3)-2.2 · 10(-2) μg μL(-1), resp.) for most amino acids, an adequate precision (2.15-20.15% for run-to-run), and a linear response for all amino acids (R (2) = 0.741-0.998) in the range of 1-100 µg mL(-1). Moreover, it takes less time and requires lower amount of sample and solvent than conventional techniques. Thus, this is a cost and time efficient tool for homogenizing in the extraction procedure of free amino acids from meat samples, being an adequate option for routine analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Chromatogram of free amino acids detected in fresh loin (a) and dry-cured ham (b) samples. Alanine (a), glycine (b), valine (c), leucine (d), isoleucine (e), norleucine (f, internal standard), proline (g), methionine (h), serine (i), threonine (j), phenylalanine (k), aspartic acid (l), hydroxyproline (m), cystine (n), glutamic acid (o), asparagine (p), lysine (q), glutamine (r), arginine (s), histidine (t), tyrosine (u), and tryptophan (v).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Chromatogram of free amino acids detected in fresh loin (a) and dry-cured ham (b) samples. Alanine (a), glycine (b), valine (c), leucine (d), isoleucine (e), norleucine (f, internal standard), proline (g), methionine (h), serine (i), threonine (j), phenylalanine (k), aspartic acid (l), hydroxyproline (m), cystine (n), glutamic acid (o), asparagine (p), lysine (q), glutamine (r), arginine (s), histidine (t), tyrosine (u), and tryptophan (v).

Mentions: Figure 2 shows a GC-MS chromatogram of the free amino acids detected in fresh loin (Figure 2(a)) and dry-cured ham (Figure 2(b)) when using M. Twenty-one free amino acids were detected in dry-cured samples: alanine, glycine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, proline, methionine, serine, threonine, phenylalanine, aspartic acid, hydroxyproline, cysteine, glutamic acid, asparagine, lysine, glutamine, arginine, histidine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, while fresh loin samples presented 18 free amino acids, the same as dry-cured hams except for arginine, histidine, and tryptophan.


A Rapid and Accurate Extraction Procedure for Analysing Free Amino Acids in Meat Samples by GC-MS.

Pérez-Palacios T, Barroso MA, Ruiz J, Antequera T - Int J Anal Chem (2015)

Chromatogram of free amino acids detected in fresh loin (a) and dry-cured ham (b) samples. Alanine (a), glycine (b), valine (c), leucine (d), isoleucine (e), norleucine (f, internal standard), proline (g), methionine (h), serine (i), threonine (j), phenylalanine (k), aspartic acid (l), hydroxyproline (m), cystine (n), glutamic acid (o), asparagine (p), lysine (q), glutamine (r), arginine (s), histidine (t), tyrosine (u), and tryptophan (v).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4383232&req=5

fig2: Chromatogram of free amino acids detected in fresh loin (a) and dry-cured ham (b) samples. Alanine (a), glycine (b), valine (c), leucine (d), isoleucine (e), norleucine (f, internal standard), proline (g), methionine (h), serine (i), threonine (j), phenylalanine (k), aspartic acid (l), hydroxyproline (m), cystine (n), glutamic acid (o), asparagine (p), lysine (q), glutamine (r), arginine (s), histidine (t), tyrosine (u), and tryptophan (v).
Mentions: Figure 2 shows a GC-MS chromatogram of the free amino acids detected in fresh loin (Figure 2(a)) and dry-cured ham (Figure 2(b)) when using M. Twenty-one free amino acids were detected in dry-cured samples: alanine, glycine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, proline, methionine, serine, threonine, phenylalanine, aspartic acid, hydroxyproline, cysteine, glutamic acid, asparagine, lysine, glutamine, arginine, histidine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, while fresh loin samples presented 18 free amino acids, the same as dry-cured hams except for arginine, histidine, and tryptophan.

Bottom Line: It also showed a low limit of detection and quantification (3.8 · 10(-4)-6.6 · 10(-4) μg μL(-1) and 1.3 · 10(-3)-2.2 · 10(-2) μg μL(-1), resp.) for most amino acids, an adequate precision (2.15-20.15% for run-to-run), and a linear response for all amino acids (R (2) = 0.741-0.998) in the range of 1-100 µg mL(-1).Moreover, it takes less time and requires lower amount of sample and solvent than conventional techniques.Thus, this is a cost and time efficient tool for homogenizing in the extraction procedure of free amino acids from meat samples, being an adequate option for routine analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Production and Food Science, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, University of Extremadura, Avenida de la Universidad s/n, 10003 Cáceres, Spain.

ABSTRACT
This study evaluated the use of a mixer mill as the homogenization tool for the extraction of free amino acids in meat samples, with the main goal of analyzing a large number of samples in the shortest time and minimizing sample amount and solvent volume. Ground samples (0.2 g) were mixed with 1.5 mL HCl 0.1 M and homogenized in the mixer mill. The final biphasic system was separated by centrifugation. The supernatant was deproteinized, derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography. This procedure showed a high extracting ability, especially in samples with high free amino acid content (recovery = 88.73-104.94%). It also showed a low limit of detection and quantification (3.8 · 10(-4)-6.6 · 10(-4) μg μL(-1) and 1.3 · 10(-3)-2.2 · 10(-2) μg μL(-1), resp.) for most amino acids, an adequate precision (2.15-20.15% for run-to-run), and a linear response for all amino acids (R (2) = 0.741-0.998) in the range of 1-100 µg mL(-1). Moreover, it takes less time and requires lower amount of sample and solvent than conventional techniques. Thus, this is a cost and time efficient tool for homogenizing in the extraction procedure of free amino acids from meat samples, being an adequate option for routine analysis.

No MeSH data available.