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Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light.

Rubio-Marcos F, Del Campo A, Marchet P, Fernández JF - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions.Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source.This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electroceramic Department, Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen 5, Madrid 28049, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO₃ at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light.

No MeSH data available.


Scheme of the BTO complex domain structure:The Figure displays a schematic illustration of the domain structure, which has been built by combining the AFM and Raman mapping information, shown in Figs 1 and 2, respectively. Scheme shows a domain structure composed of a-domain and c-domain, which are representend in red and blue colours, with a head-to-head configuration. The head-to-head configuration maximizes the internal stress at close to the domain wall. As a consequence of these internal stresses the a-c-domains are hindered by b-domains, which are represented in green colour. The insert of the b-domains structure shows how internal stress at the domain wall is minimized by a bundle of alternate a-domain and c-domain.
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f3: Scheme of the BTO complex domain structure:The Figure displays a schematic illustration of the domain structure, which has been built by combining the AFM and Raman mapping information, shown in Figs 1 and 2, respectively. Scheme shows a domain structure composed of a-domain and c-domain, which are representend in red and blue colours, with a head-to-head configuration. The head-to-head configuration maximizes the internal stress at close to the domain wall. As a consequence of these internal stresses the a-c-domains are hindered by b-domains, which are represented in green colour. The insert of the b-domains structure shows how internal stress at the domain wall is minimized by a bundle of alternate a-domain and c-domain.

Mentions: A phenomenological model describing the formation of the b-domain structure is built by combining the AFM and Raman mapping information (Fig. 3). The structure is composed of a-domains (red) and c-domains (blue). The b-domains (green) appear in the a–c-domain wall within the ({101}pc) plane. The a–c-domain wall is associated with a head-to-head 90° domain wall, where the mechanical stress is enhanced. We also envisage that the head-to-head configuration maximizes the bound charge close to the domain wall. The b-domains minimize the internal stress by increasing the domain wall density, (insert of Fig. 3). With regards to this discernment, we believe that the b-domains are critical to stabilize the a–c-domain wall stress and its head-to-head configuration.


Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light.

Rubio-Marcos F, Del Campo A, Marchet P, Fernández JF - Nat Commun (2015)

Scheme of the BTO complex domain structure:The Figure displays a schematic illustration of the domain structure, which has been built by combining the AFM and Raman mapping information, shown in Figs 1 and 2, respectively. Scheme shows a domain structure composed of a-domain and c-domain, which are representend in red and blue colours, with a head-to-head configuration. The head-to-head configuration maximizes the internal stress at close to the domain wall. As a consequence of these internal stresses the a-c-domains are hindered by b-domains, which are represented in green colour. The insert of the b-domains structure shows how internal stress at the domain wall is minimized by a bundle of alternate a-domain and c-domain.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4382678&req=5

f3: Scheme of the BTO complex domain structure:The Figure displays a schematic illustration of the domain structure, which has been built by combining the AFM and Raman mapping information, shown in Figs 1 and 2, respectively. Scheme shows a domain structure composed of a-domain and c-domain, which are representend in red and blue colours, with a head-to-head configuration. The head-to-head configuration maximizes the internal stress at close to the domain wall. As a consequence of these internal stresses the a-c-domains are hindered by b-domains, which are represented in green colour. The insert of the b-domains structure shows how internal stress at the domain wall is minimized by a bundle of alternate a-domain and c-domain.
Mentions: A phenomenological model describing the formation of the b-domain structure is built by combining the AFM and Raman mapping information (Fig. 3). The structure is composed of a-domains (red) and c-domains (blue). The b-domains (green) appear in the a–c-domain wall within the ({101}pc) plane. The a–c-domain wall is associated with a head-to-head 90° domain wall, where the mechanical stress is enhanced. We also envisage that the head-to-head configuration maximizes the bound charge close to the domain wall. The b-domains minimize the internal stress by increasing the domain wall density, (insert of Fig. 3). With regards to this discernment, we believe that the b-domains are critical to stabilize the a–c-domain wall stress and its head-to-head configuration.

Bottom Line: The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions.Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source.This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electroceramic Department, Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen 5, Madrid 28049, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO₃ at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light.

No MeSH data available.