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Digital games for type 1 and type 2 diabetes: underpinning theory with three illustrative examples.

Kamel Boulos MN, Gammon S, Dixon MC, MacRury SM, Fergusson MJ, Miranda Rodrigues F, Mourinho Baptista T, Yang SP - JMIR Serious Games (2015)

Bottom Line: In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabetes-children/adolescents and adults-from a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples).The games target different age groups with different needs-children with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes.More research evidence from full-scale evaluation studies is needed and expected in the near future that will quantify, qualify, and establish the evidence base concerning this gamification potential, such as what works in each age group/patient type, what does not, and under which settings and criteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The Alexander Graham Bell Centre for Digital Health, Moray College UHI, University of the Highlands and Islands, Elgin, United Kingdom. maged.kamelboulos@uhi.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Digital games are an important class of eHealth interventions in diabetes, made possible by the Internet and a good range of affordable mobile devices (eg, mobile phones and tablets) available to consumers these days. Gamifying disease management can help children, adolescents, and adults with diabetes to better cope with their lifelong condition. Gamification and social in-game components are used to motivate players/patients and positively change their behavior and lifestyle. In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabetes-children/adolescents and adults-from a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples). The games target different age groups with different needs-children with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive review of all digital game offerings available for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but rather to serve as a taster of a few of the game genres on offer today for both types of diabetes, with a brief discussion of (1) some of the underpinning psychological mechanisms of gamified digital interventions and platforms as self-management adherence tools, and more, in diabetes, and (2) some of the hypothesized potential benefits that might be gained from their routine use by people with diabetes. More research evidence from full-scale evaluation studies is needed and expected in the near future that will quantify, qualify, and establish the evidence base concerning this gamification potential, such as what works in each age group/patient type, what does not, and under which settings and criteria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gamification features (adapted from Hamari et al [38]).
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figure5: Gamification features (adapted from Hamari et al [38]).

Mentions: Conceptualizing gamification for healthy behavior change, Hamari et al [38] simplified it into three components: motivational affordances, psychological outcomes, and behavioral outcomes (Figure 5). Motivational affordances include the following game features: points, leaderboards, achievements/badges, levels, stories, goals, feedback, rewards, progress, and challenges. Psychological outcomes include motivation, attitude, and enjoyment, while behavioral outcomes include whatever intended behavior was targeted, such as healthier eating, monitoring blood glucose levels, or exercising for a specific amount of time or intensity [38,39]. Gamification features are not dissimilar to validated behavior change elements, including providing feedback on performance, goal setting (ie, self-efficacy), and comparison with others, to name a few [40].


Digital games for type 1 and type 2 diabetes: underpinning theory with three illustrative examples.

Kamel Boulos MN, Gammon S, Dixon MC, MacRury SM, Fergusson MJ, Miranda Rodrigues F, Mourinho Baptista T, Yang SP - JMIR Serious Games (2015)

Gamification features (adapted from Hamari et al [38]).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4382565&req=5

figure5: Gamification features (adapted from Hamari et al [38]).
Mentions: Conceptualizing gamification for healthy behavior change, Hamari et al [38] simplified it into three components: motivational affordances, psychological outcomes, and behavioral outcomes (Figure 5). Motivational affordances include the following game features: points, leaderboards, achievements/badges, levels, stories, goals, feedback, rewards, progress, and challenges. Psychological outcomes include motivation, attitude, and enjoyment, while behavioral outcomes include whatever intended behavior was targeted, such as healthier eating, monitoring blood glucose levels, or exercising for a specific amount of time or intensity [38,39]. Gamification features are not dissimilar to validated behavior change elements, including providing feedback on performance, goal setting (ie, self-efficacy), and comparison with others, to name a few [40].

Bottom Line: In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabetes-children/adolescents and adults-from a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples).The games target different age groups with different needs-children with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes.More research evidence from full-scale evaluation studies is needed and expected in the near future that will quantify, qualify, and establish the evidence base concerning this gamification potential, such as what works in each age group/patient type, what does not, and under which settings and criteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The Alexander Graham Bell Centre for Digital Health, Moray College UHI, University of the Highlands and Islands, Elgin, United Kingdom. maged.kamelboulos@uhi.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Digital games are an important class of eHealth interventions in diabetes, made possible by the Internet and a good range of affordable mobile devices (eg, mobile phones and tablets) available to consumers these days. Gamifying disease management can help children, adolescents, and adults with diabetes to better cope with their lifelong condition. Gamification and social in-game components are used to motivate players/patients and positively change their behavior and lifestyle. In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabetes-children/adolescents and adults-from a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples). The games target different age groups with different needs-children with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive review of all digital game offerings available for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but rather to serve as a taster of a few of the game genres on offer today for both types of diabetes, with a brief discussion of (1) some of the underpinning psychological mechanisms of gamified digital interventions and platforms as self-management adherence tools, and more, in diabetes, and (2) some of the hypothesized potential benefits that might be gained from their routine use by people with diabetes. More research evidence from full-scale evaluation studies is needed and expected in the near future that will quantify, qualify, and establish the evidence base concerning this gamification potential, such as what works in each age group/patient type, what does not, and under which settings and criteria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus