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In-home occupational therapy for a patient with stage IV lung cancer: changes in quality of life and analysis of causes.

Imanishi M, Tomohisa H, Higaki K - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: A histogram of QOL scores demonstrated a rapid increase followed by a mild decrease and then stable level.We also confirmed that occupational therapy, such as writing letters or keeping a diary, reminded her of her late parents, hometown and childhood and helped her accept death.Further, an active lifestyle played an important role in helping the patient accept death and lead a peaceful and stable life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Rehabilitation Sciences, Osaka Prefectural University, Habikino 3-7-30, Habikino-shi, Osaka Japan.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We tracked and analyzed the changes in the quality of life (QOL) of a stage 4 lung cancer patient receiving occupational therapy at home.

Case description: In a longitudinal study consisting of 4 evaluations over 9 months, a 66-year-old female with lung cancer was assessed using the Philadelphia Geriatric Center (PGC) Morale Scale and the 100-Point Satisfaction Scale. The QOL scores over time and factors influencing changes in these scores were analyzed.

Discussion and evaluation: A histogram of QOL scores demonstrated a rapid increase followed by a mild decrease and then stable level. Interviews revealed the patient's response to knowing her life expectancy, meeting a qualified occupational therapist, increasing her leisure activity, changing her family relationships and facing the prospect of death. We also confirmed that occupational therapy, such as writing letters or keeping a diary, reminded her of her late parents, hometown and childhood and helped her accept death.

Conclusions: For a terminal lung cancer patient, meeting an occupational therapist to discuss fear or self-loathing improved QOL. Further, an active lifestyle played an important role in helping the patient accept death and lead a peaceful and stable life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The path of client A’s QOL scores.
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Fig1: The path of client A’s QOL scores.

Mentions: In response to religious discussions, the therapist listened closely in silence and nodded in agreement. For simple everyday conversation, the therapist assumed the role of a socially inexperienced person asking to be taught. However, this did not mean that the patient felt no pain and loneliness. The therapist sent a clear message to the patient that she should feel comfortable sharing her feelings (Figure 1).Figure 1


In-home occupational therapy for a patient with stage IV lung cancer: changes in quality of life and analysis of causes.

Imanishi M, Tomohisa H, Higaki K - Springerplus (2015)

The path of client A’s QOL scores.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4382498&req=5

Fig1: The path of client A’s QOL scores.
Mentions: In response to religious discussions, the therapist listened closely in silence and nodded in agreement. For simple everyday conversation, the therapist assumed the role of a socially inexperienced person asking to be taught. However, this did not mean that the patient felt no pain and loneliness. The therapist sent a clear message to the patient that she should feel comfortable sharing her feelings (Figure 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: A histogram of QOL scores demonstrated a rapid increase followed by a mild decrease and then stable level.We also confirmed that occupational therapy, such as writing letters or keeping a diary, reminded her of her late parents, hometown and childhood and helped her accept death.Further, an active lifestyle played an important role in helping the patient accept death and lead a peaceful and stable life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Rehabilitation Sciences, Osaka Prefectural University, Habikino 3-7-30, Habikino-shi, Osaka Japan.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We tracked and analyzed the changes in the quality of life (QOL) of a stage 4 lung cancer patient receiving occupational therapy at home.

Case description: In a longitudinal study consisting of 4 evaluations over 9 months, a 66-year-old female with lung cancer was assessed using the Philadelphia Geriatric Center (PGC) Morale Scale and the 100-Point Satisfaction Scale. The QOL scores over time and factors influencing changes in these scores were analyzed.

Discussion and evaluation: A histogram of QOL scores demonstrated a rapid increase followed by a mild decrease and then stable level. Interviews revealed the patient's response to knowing her life expectancy, meeting a qualified occupational therapist, increasing her leisure activity, changing her family relationships and facing the prospect of death. We also confirmed that occupational therapy, such as writing letters or keeping a diary, reminded her of her late parents, hometown and childhood and helped her accept death.

Conclusions: For a terminal lung cancer patient, meeting an occupational therapist to discuss fear or self-loathing improved QOL. Further, an active lifestyle played an important role in helping the patient accept death and lead a peaceful and stable life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus