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A comparison of health outcomes in older versus younger adults following a road traffic crash injury: a cohort study.

Gopinath B, Harris IA, Nicholas M, Casey P, Blyth F, Maher CG, Cameron ID - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We aimed to determine whether health outcomes (pain severity and quality of life measures) over 24 months differ significantly between older (65+) and younger adults (18-64).At 12- and 24-month follow-up, older compared to younger participants who had sustained a mild/moderate musculoskeletal injury had lower physical functioning (3.9-units lower Short Form-12 Physical Composite Score, multivariable-adjusted p = 0.03 at both examinations).After multivariable adjustment, older (n = 45) versus younger (n = 207) participants had lower self-perceived health status (8.1-units lower European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions Visual Acuity Scale scores at 24 months, p = 0.03), 24 months later.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Given the aging demographics of most developed countries, understanding the public health impact of mild/moderate road traffic crash injuries in older adults is important. We aimed to determine whether health outcomes (pain severity and quality of life measures) over 24 months differ significantly between older (65+) and younger adults (18-64).

Methods: Prospective cohort study of 364, 284 and 252 participants with mild/moderate injury following a vehicle collision at baseline, 12 and 24 months, respectively. A telephone-administered questionnaire obtained information on socio-economic, pre- and post-injury psychological and heath characteristics.

Results: At baseline, there were 55 (15.1%) and 309 (84.9%) participants aged ≥65 and 18-64 years, respectively. At 12- and 24-month follow-up, older compared to younger participants who had sustained a mild/moderate musculoskeletal injury had lower physical functioning (3.9-units lower Short Form-12 Physical Composite Score, multivariable-adjusted p = 0.03 at both examinations). After multivariable adjustment, older (n = 45) versus younger (n = 207) participants had lower self-perceived health status (8.1-units lower European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions Visual Acuity Scale scores at 24 months, p = 0.03), 24 months later.

Conclusions: Older compared to younger participants who sustained a mild/moderate injury following a road-traffic crash demonstrated poorer physical functioning and general health at 24 months.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of study participation.
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pone.0122732.g001: Flowchart of study participation.

Mentions: A total of 1,515 insurance claims that were lodged between March 2010 and December 2010 were deemed to be potential participants (Fig 1), and these individuals were sent a letter of invitation by the MAA together with the Participant Information Sheet. An opportunity to opt out of the study within 2 weeks was provided, following which, verbal consent was sought. As the survey was conducted over the phone, obtaining verbal consent was deemed to be appropriate. Completion of the survey was documented as giving consent to participate and this was recorded by the research nurse who administered the survey. This study (including use of verbal consent) was approved by the University of Sydney health research ethics committee. This study was conducted according to the principles expressed in the Declaration of Helsinki.


A comparison of health outcomes in older versus younger adults following a road traffic crash injury: a cohort study.

Gopinath B, Harris IA, Nicholas M, Casey P, Blyth F, Maher CG, Cameron ID - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flowchart of study participation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4382341&req=5

pone.0122732.g001: Flowchart of study participation.
Mentions: A total of 1,515 insurance claims that were lodged between March 2010 and December 2010 were deemed to be potential participants (Fig 1), and these individuals were sent a letter of invitation by the MAA together with the Participant Information Sheet. An opportunity to opt out of the study within 2 weeks was provided, following which, verbal consent was sought. As the survey was conducted over the phone, obtaining verbal consent was deemed to be appropriate. Completion of the survey was documented as giving consent to participate and this was recorded by the research nurse who administered the survey. This study (including use of verbal consent) was approved by the University of Sydney health research ethics committee. This study was conducted according to the principles expressed in the Declaration of Helsinki.

Bottom Line: We aimed to determine whether health outcomes (pain severity and quality of life measures) over 24 months differ significantly between older (65+) and younger adults (18-64).At 12- and 24-month follow-up, older compared to younger participants who had sustained a mild/moderate musculoskeletal injury had lower physical functioning (3.9-units lower Short Form-12 Physical Composite Score, multivariable-adjusted p = 0.03 at both examinations).After multivariable adjustment, older (n = 45) versus younger (n = 207) participants had lower self-perceived health status (8.1-units lower European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions Visual Acuity Scale scores at 24 months, p = 0.03), 24 months later.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Given the aging demographics of most developed countries, understanding the public health impact of mild/moderate road traffic crash injuries in older adults is important. We aimed to determine whether health outcomes (pain severity and quality of life measures) over 24 months differ significantly between older (65+) and younger adults (18-64).

Methods: Prospective cohort study of 364, 284 and 252 participants with mild/moderate injury following a vehicle collision at baseline, 12 and 24 months, respectively. A telephone-administered questionnaire obtained information on socio-economic, pre- and post-injury psychological and heath characteristics.

Results: At baseline, there were 55 (15.1%) and 309 (84.9%) participants aged ≥65 and 18-64 years, respectively. At 12- and 24-month follow-up, older compared to younger participants who had sustained a mild/moderate musculoskeletal injury had lower physical functioning (3.9-units lower Short Form-12 Physical Composite Score, multivariable-adjusted p = 0.03 at both examinations). After multivariable adjustment, older (n = 45) versus younger (n = 207) participants had lower self-perceived health status (8.1-units lower European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions Visual Acuity Scale scores at 24 months, p = 0.03), 24 months later.

Conclusions: Older compared to younger participants who sustained a mild/moderate injury following a road-traffic crash demonstrated poorer physical functioning and general health at 24 months.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus