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Species of Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) in wildlife: A review.

Spratt DM - Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl (2015)

Bottom Line: Small experimental doses of infective larvae (ca. 20) given to normal or aberrant hosts are tolerated, although generally eliciting a granulomatous histopathological response; large doses (100-500 larvae) often result in clinical signs and/or death.Angiostrongylus cantonensis occurs in domestic animals, mammalian and avian wildlife and humans in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, where it has been suggested that tawny frogmouths and brushtail possums may serve as biosentinels.A major conservation issue is the devastating role A. cantonensis may play around zoos and fauna parks where captive rearing of endangered species programmes may exist and where Rattus spp. are invariably a problem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Australian National Wildlife Collection, CSIRO National Research Collections, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Twenty-one species of Angiostrongylus plus Angiostrongylus sp. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) are known currently in wildlife. These occur naturally in rodents, tupaiids, mephitids, mustelids, procyonids, felids, and canids, and aberrantly in a range of avian, marsupial and eutherian hosts including humans. Adults inhabit the pulmonary arteries and right atrium, ventricle and vena cava, bronchioles of the lung or arteries of the caecum and mesentery. All species pass first-stage larvae in the faeces of the host and all utilise slugs and/or aquatic or terrestrial snails as intermediate hosts. Gastropods are infected by ingestion or penetration of first-stage larvae; definitive hosts by ingestion of gastropods or gastropod slime. Transmission of at least one species may involve ingestion of paratenic hosts. Five developmental pathways are identified in these life cycles. Thirteen species, including Angiostrongylus sp., are known primarily from the original descriptions suggesting limited geographic distributions. The remaining species are widespread either globally or regionally, and are continuing to spread. Small experimental doses of infective larvae (ca. 20) given to normal or aberrant hosts are tolerated, although generally eliciting a granulomatous histopathological response; large doses (100-500 larvae) often result in clinical signs and/or death. Two species, A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis, are established zoonoses causing neurological and abdominal angiostrongliasis respectively. The zoonotic potential of A. mackerrasae, A. malaysiensis and A. siamensis particularly warrant investigation. Angiostrongylus cantonensis occurs in domestic animals, mammalian and avian wildlife and humans in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, where it has been suggested that tawny frogmouths and brushtail possums may serve as biosentinels. A major conservation issue is the devastating role A. cantonensis may play around zoos and fauna parks where captive rearing of endangered species programmes may exist and where Rattus spp. are invariably a problem.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Immature Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the cerebellum of a brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, with extensive granulomatous and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis and malacia (adapted from Ma et al., 2013, fig. 7).
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f0025: Immature Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the cerebellum of a brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, with extensive granulomatous and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis and malacia (adapted from Ma et al., 2013, fig. 7).

Mentions: The author expresses his thanks to Professor Ian Beveridge and an anonymous reviewer for critical evaluation of an earlier draft of the manuscript, to Dr. Crystal Kelehear for preparation of the Graphical abstract, to Drs. Richard Montali and Karrie Rose for provision of Fig. 2, and to Gemma Ma for provision of Fig. 3. Fig. 1 is adapted from The Lancet Infectious Diseases Vol. 8, Wang, Q-P., Lai, D-H, Zhu, X-Q, Chen, X-G, Lun, Z-R. Human angiostrongyliasis, pp. 621–630, October 2008, with permission from Elsevier, License number 3511700383518.


Species of Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) in wildlife: A review.

Spratt DM - Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl (2015)

Immature Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the cerebellum of a brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, with extensive granulomatous and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis and malacia (adapted from Ma et al., 2013, fig. 7).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4381133&req=5

f0025: Immature Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the cerebellum of a brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, with extensive granulomatous and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis and malacia (adapted from Ma et al., 2013, fig. 7).
Mentions: The author expresses his thanks to Professor Ian Beveridge and an anonymous reviewer for critical evaluation of an earlier draft of the manuscript, to Dr. Crystal Kelehear for preparation of the Graphical abstract, to Drs. Richard Montali and Karrie Rose for provision of Fig. 2, and to Gemma Ma for provision of Fig. 3. Fig. 1 is adapted from The Lancet Infectious Diseases Vol. 8, Wang, Q-P., Lai, D-H, Zhu, X-Q, Chen, X-G, Lun, Z-R. Human angiostrongyliasis, pp. 621–630, October 2008, with permission from Elsevier, License number 3511700383518.

Bottom Line: Small experimental doses of infective larvae (ca. 20) given to normal or aberrant hosts are tolerated, although generally eliciting a granulomatous histopathological response; large doses (100-500 larvae) often result in clinical signs and/or death.Angiostrongylus cantonensis occurs in domestic animals, mammalian and avian wildlife and humans in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, where it has been suggested that tawny frogmouths and brushtail possums may serve as biosentinels.A major conservation issue is the devastating role A. cantonensis may play around zoos and fauna parks where captive rearing of endangered species programmes may exist and where Rattus spp. are invariably a problem.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Australian National Wildlife Collection, CSIRO National Research Collections, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Twenty-one species of Angiostrongylus plus Angiostrongylus sp. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) are known currently in wildlife. These occur naturally in rodents, tupaiids, mephitids, mustelids, procyonids, felids, and canids, and aberrantly in a range of avian, marsupial and eutherian hosts including humans. Adults inhabit the pulmonary arteries and right atrium, ventricle and vena cava, bronchioles of the lung or arteries of the caecum and mesentery. All species pass first-stage larvae in the faeces of the host and all utilise slugs and/or aquatic or terrestrial snails as intermediate hosts. Gastropods are infected by ingestion or penetration of first-stage larvae; definitive hosts by ingestion of gastropods or gastropod slime. Transmission of at least one species may involve ingestion of paratenic hosts. Five developmental pathways are identified in these life cycles. Thirteen species, including Angiostrongylus sp., are known primarily from the original descriptions suggesting limited geographic distributions. The remaining species are widespread either globally or regionally, and are continuing to spread. Small experimental doses of infective larvae (ca. 20) given to normal or aberrant hosts are tolerated, although generally eliciting a granulomatous histopathological response; large doses (100-500 larvae) often result in clinical signs and/or death. Two species, A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis, are established zoonoses causing neurological and abdominal angiostrongliasis respectively. The zoonotic potential of A. mackerrasae, A. malaysiensis and A. siamensis particularly warrant investigation. Angiostrongylus cantonensis occurs in domestic animals, mammalian and avian wildlife and humans in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, where it has been suggested that tawny frogmouths and brushtail possums may serve as biosentinels. A major conservation issue is the devastating role A. cantonensis may play around zoos and fauna parks where captive rearing of endangered species programmes may exist and where Rattus spp. are invariably a problem.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus