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Association between outdoor ozone and compensated acute respiratory diseases among workers in Quebec (Canada).

Adam-Poupart A, Labrèche F, Busque MA, Brand A, Duguay P, Fournier M, Zayed J, Smargiassi A - Ind Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Respiratory effects of ozone in the workplace have not been extensively studied.Daily concentrations of ozone were estimated using a spatiotemporal model.Considering the predicted increase of air pollutant concentrations in the context of climate change, closer investigation should be carried out on outdoor workers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Université de Montréal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Respiratory effects of ozone in the workplace have not been extensively studied. Our aim was to explore the relationship between daily average ozone levels and compensated acute respiratory problems among workers in Quebec between 2003 and 2010 using a time-stratified case-crossover design. Health data came from the Workers' Compensation Board. Daily concentrations of ozone were estimated using a spatiotemporal model. Conditional logistic regressions, with and without adjustment for temperature, were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs, per 1 ppb increase of ozone), and lag effects were assessed. Relationships with respiratory compensations in all industrial sectors were essentially . Positive non-statistically significant associations were observed for outdoor sectors, and decreased after controlling for temperature (ORs of 0.98; 1.01 and 1.05 at Lags 0, 1 and 2 respectively). Considering the predicted increase of air pollutant concentrations in the context of climate change, closer investigation should be carried out on outdoor workers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Geographical location the territory (dark grey) where daily ozone levels were availablein Quebec (Canada).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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fig_001: Geographical location the territory (dark grey) where daily ozone levels were availablein Quebec (Canada).

Mentions: The study area was restricted to the territory where daily ozone levels were available (Fig. 1Fig. 1.


Association between outdoor ozone and compensated acute respiratory diseases among workers in Quebec (Canada).

Adam-Poupart A, Labrèche F, Busque MA, Brand A, Duguay P, Fournier M, Zayed J, Smargiassi A - Ind Health (2015)

Geographical location the territory (dark grey) where daily ozone levels were availablein Quebec (Canada).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380604&req=5

fig_001: Geographical location the territory (dark grey) where daily ozone levels were availablein Quebec (Canada).
Mentions: The study area was restricted to the territory where daily ozone levels were available (Fig. 1Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: Respiratory effects of ozone in the workplace have not been extensively studied.Daily concentrations of ozone were estimated using a spatiotemporal model.Considering the predicted increase of air pollutant concentrations in the context of climate change, closer investigation should be carried out on outdoor workers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Université de Montréal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Respiratory effects of ozone in the workplace have not been extensively studied. Our aim was to explore the relationship between daily average ozone levels and compensated acute respiratory problems among workers in Quebec between 2003 and 2010 using a time-stratified case-crossover design. Health data came from the Workers' Compensation Board. Daily concentrations of ozone were estimated using a spatiotemporal model. Conditional logistic regressions, with and without adjustment for temperature, were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs, per 1 ppb increase of ozone), and lag effects were assessed. Relationships with respiratory compensations in all industrial sectors were essentially . Positive non-statistically significant associations were observed for outdoor sectors, and decreased after controlling for temperature (ORs of 0.98; 1.01 and 1.05 at Lags 0, 1 and 2 respectively). Considering the predicted increase of air pollutant concentrations in the context of climate change, closer investigation should be carried out on outdoor workers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus