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The neural mechanisms of re-experiencing mental fatigue sensation: a magnetoencephalography study.

Ishii A, Karasuyama T, Kikuchi T, Tanaka M, Yamano E, Watanabe Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Thirteen healthy volunteers participated in fatigue and non-fatigue experiments in a crossover fashion.In the non-fatigue experiment, the participants performed a free session for 15 min, a rest session for 15 min, and an MEG session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body without fatigue that they had experienced in the free session.Spatial filtering analyses of oscillatory brain activity showed that the delta band power in the left Brodmann's area (BA) 39, alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus and the left BA 40, and beta band power in the left BA 40 were lower when they re-experienced the fatigue sensation than when they re-experienced the fatigue-free sensation, indicating that these brain regions are related to re-experiencing the fatigue sensation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka, 545-8585, Japan.

ABSTRACT
There have been several studies which have tried to clarify the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation; however fatigue sensation has multiple aspects. We hypothesized that past experience related to fatigue sensation is an important factor which contributes to future formation of fatigue sensation through the transfer to memories that are located within specific brain structures. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation related to memory. In the present study, we investigated the neural activity caused by re-experiencing the fatigue sensation that had been experienced during a fatigue-inducing session. Thirteen healthy volunteers participated in fatigue and non-fatigue experiments in a crossover fashion. In the fatigue experiment, they performed a 2-back test session for 40 min to induce fatigue sensation, a rest session for 15 min to recover from fatigue, and a magnetoencephalography (MEG) session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body with fatigue that they had experienced in the 2-back test session. In the non-fatigue experiment, the participants performed a free session for 15 min, a rest session for 15 min, and an MEG session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body without fatigue that they had experienced in the free session. Spatial filtering analyses of oscillatory brain activity showed that the delta band power in the left Brodmann's area (BA) 39, alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus and the left BA 40, and beta band power in the left BA 40 were lower when they re-experienced the fatigue sensation than when they re-experienced the fatigue-free sensation, indicating that these brain regions are related to re-experiencing the fatigue sensation. Our findings may help clarify the neural mechanisms underlying fatigue sensation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Statistical parametric maps of brain regions where power was lower in the fatigue experiment than in the non-fatigue experiment: the delta band (1–4 Hz) power in the left BA 39 (A), alpha band (8–13 Hz) power in the right pulvinar nucleus (B) and the left Brodmann’s area (BA) 40 (C), and beta band (13–25 Hz) power in the left BA 40 (D).Statistical parametric maps are superimposed on surface-rendered high-resolution magnetic resonance images. The right (R) and left (L) sides are indicated. The color bars indicate t-values. Random-effect analyses of 13 participants, P < 0.05, familywise-error corrected for the entire search volumes.
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pone.0122455.g003: Statistical parametric maps of brain regions where power was lower in the fatigue experiment than in the non-fatigue experiment: the delta band (1–4 Hz) power in the left BA 39 (A), alpha band (8–13 Hz) power in the right pulvinar nucleus (B) and the left Brodmann’s area (BA) 40 (C), and beta band (13–25 Hz) power in the left BA 40 (D).Statistical parametric maps are superimposed on surface-rendered high-resolution magnetic resonance images. The right (R) and left (L) sides are indicated. The color bars indicate t-values. Random-effect analyses of 13 participants, P < 0.05, familywise-error corrected for the entire search volumes.

Mentions: To identify the brain regions activated by re-experiencing the fatigue sensation caused by the 2-back test trials, the oscillatory power in delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands was compared between the fatigue and non-fatigue experiments. The delta band power in the left BA 39 (Fig 3A), alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus (Fig 3B) and the left BA 40 (Fig 3C), and beta band power in the left BA 40 (Fig 3D) were lower in the fatigue experiment than in the non-fatigue experiment (Table 1). The decrease in the beta band power in the left BA 40 was positively associated with the level of fatigue sensation the participants thought to be caused by performing the 2-back task trials (r = 0.669, P = 0.012). The decrease in the alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus was positively associated with the daily level of fatigue assessed using Chalder’s fatigue scale (r = 0.734, P = 0.004).


The neural mechanisms of re-experiencing mental fatigue sensation: a magnetoencephalography study.

Ishii A, Karasuyama T, Kikuchi T, Tanaka M, Yamano E, Watanabe Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Statistical parametric maps of brain regions where power was lower in the fatigue experiment than in the non-fatigue experiment: the delta band (1–4 Hz) power in the left BA 39 (A), alpha band (8–13 Hz) power in the right pulvinar nucleus (B) and the left Brodmann’s area (BA) 40 (C), and beta band (13–25 Hz) power in the left BA 40 (D).Statistical parametric maps are superimposed on surface-rendered high-resolution magnetic resonance images. The right (R) and left (L) sides are indicated. The color bars indicate t-values. Random-effect analyses of 13 participants, P < 0.05, familywise-error corrected for the entire search volumes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380441&req=5

pone.0122455.g003: Statistical parametric maps of brain regions where power was lower in the fatigue experiment than in the non-fatigue experiment: the delta band (1–4 Hz) power in the left BA 39 (A), alpha band (8–13 Hz) power in the right pulvinar nucleus (B) and the left Brodmann’s area (BA) 40 (C), and beta band (13–25 Hz) power in the left BA 40 (D).Statistical parametric maps are superimposed on surface-rendered high-resolution magnetic resonance images. The right (R) and left (L) sides are indicated. The color bars indicate t-values. Random-effect analyses of 13 participants, P < 0.05, familywise-error corrected for the entire search volumes.
Mentions: To identify the brain regions activated by re-experiencing the fatigue sensation caused by the 2-back test trials, the oscillatory power in delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands was compared between the fatigue and non-fatigue experiments. The delta band power in the left BA 39 (Fig 3A), alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus (Fig 3B) and the left BA 40 (Fig 3C), and beta band power in the left BA 40 (Fig 3D) were lower in the fatigue experiment than in the non-fatigue experiment (Table 1). The decrease in the beta band power in the left BA 40 was positively associated with the level of fatigue sensation the participants thought to be caused by performing the 2-back task trials (r = 0.669, P = 0.012). The decrease in the alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus was positively associated with the daily level of fatigue assessed using Chalder’s fatigue scale (r = 0.734, P = 0.004).

Bottom Line: Thirteen healthy volunteers participated in fatigue and non-fatigue experiments in a crossover fashion.In the non-fatigue experiment, the participants performed a free session for 15 min, a rest session for 15 min, and an MEG session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body without fatigue that they had experienced in the free session.Spatial filtering analyses of oscillatory brain activity showed that the delta band power in the left Brodmann's area (BA) 39, alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus and the left BA 40, and beta band power in the left BA 40 were lower when they re-experienced the fatigue sensation than when they re-experienced the fatigue-free sensation, indicating that these brain regions are related to re-experiencing the fatigue sensation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-ku, Osaka, 545-8585, Japan.

ABSTRACT
There have been several studies which have tried to clarify the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation; however fatigue sensation has multiple aspects. We hypothesized that past experience related to fatigue sensation is an important factor which contributes to future formation of fatigue sensation through the transfer to memories that are located within specific brain structures. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation related to memory. In the present study, we investigated the neural activity caused by re-experiencing the fatigue sensation that had been experienced during a fatigue-inducing session. Thirteen healthy volunteers participated in fatigue and non-fatigue experiments in a crossover fashion. In the fatigue experiment, they performed a 2-back test session for 40 min to induce fatigue sensation, a rest session for 15 min to recover from fatigue, and a magnetoencephalography (MEG) session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body with fatigue that they had experienced in the 2-back test session. In the non-fatigue experiment, the participants performed a free session for 15 min, a rest session for 15 min, and an MEG session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body without fatigue that they had experienced in the free session. Spatial filtering analyses of oscillatory brain activity showed that the delta band power in the left Brodmann's area (BA) 39, alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus and the left BA 40, and beta band power in the left BA 40 were lower when they re-experienced the fatigue sensation than when they re-experienced the fatigue-free sensation, indicating that these brain regions are related to re-experiencing the fatigue sensation. Our findings may help clarify the neural mechanisms underlying fatigue sensation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus