Limits...
Deficits in error-monitoring by college students with schizotypal traits: an event-related potential study.

Kim SH, Jang KM, Kim MS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Additionally, ERN amplitude measured at FCz was negatively correlated with the error rate on the Simon task in the schizotypal-trait group but not in the control group.The two groups did not differ in terms of correct-related potentials (CRN), error positivity (Pe) and correct-related positivity (Pc) amplitudes.The present results indicate that individuals with schizotypal traits have deficits in error-monitoring and that reduced ERN amplitudes may represent a biological marker of schizophrenia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Sungshin Women's University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The present study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate deficits in error-monitoring by college students with schizotypal traits. Scores on the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) were used to categorize the participants into schizotypal-trait (n = 17) and normal control (n = 20) groups. The error-monitoring abilities of the participants were evaluated using the Simon task, which consists of congruent (locations of stimulus and response are the same) and incongruent (locations of stimulus and response are different) conditions. The schizotypal-trait group committed more errors on the Simon task and exhibited smaller error-related negativity (ERN) amplitudes than did the control group. Additionally, ERN amplitude measured at FCz was negatively correlated with the error rate on the Simon task in the schizotypal-trait group but not in the control group. The two groups did not differ in terms of correct-related potentials (CRN), error positivity (Pe) and correct-related positivity (Pc) amplitudes. The present results indicate that individuals with schizotypal traits have deficits in error-monitoring and that reduced ERN amplitudes may represent a biological marker of schizophrenia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The Simon task.A) Four stimuli (a circle, a bright square, a dark square, and a pentagon) were presented, and a specific response location was designated for each stimulus. B) The Simon task consists of a congruent condition, under which the locations of stimulus and response are the same, and an incongruent condition, under which the locations of stimulus and response are different.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380405&req=5

pone.0122861.g001: The Simon task.A) Four stimuli (a circle, a bright square, a dark square, and a pentagon) were presented, and a specific response location was designated for each stimulus. B) The Simon task consists of a congruent condition, under which the locations of stimulus and response are the same, and an incongruent condition, under which the locations of stimulus and response are different.

Mentions: The Simon task was administered to measure error-monitoring. Four stimuli (i.e., a circle, a bright square, a dark square, and a pentagon) were presented, and a specific response location was designated for each stimulus (Fig 1A). The stimulus was randomly presented on either the left or right side of a fixation cross (+) that appeared at the center of the computer monitor, and participants were asked to respond by pressing the button associated with the stimulus as rapidly and accurately as possible. The Simon task consists of a congruent condition, under which the locations of the stimulus and the response-button designated for that stimulus are the same, and an incongruent condition, under which the locations of the stimulus and the button designated for that stimulus are different (Fig 1B). Thus, one congruent and three incongruent conditions could be presented, but this study presented both the congruent and incongruent conditions (360:360 trials) and the three incongruent conditions at the same rate (120:120:120 trials). A total of 780 trials were administered randomly in three blocks and the associations between the stimulus and its response position were changed across the blocks.


Deficits in error-monitoring by college students with schizotypal traits: an event-related potential study.

Kim SH, Jang KM, Kim MS - PLoS ONE (2015)

The Simon task.A) Four stimuli (a circle, a bright square, a dark square, and a pentagon) were presented, and a specific response location was designated for each stimulus. B) The Simon task consists of a congruent condition, under which the locations of stimulus and response are the same, and an incongruent condition, under which the locations of stimulus and response are different.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380405&req=5

pone.0122861.g001: The Simon task.A) Four stimuli (a circle, a bright square, a dark square, and a pentagon) were presented, and a specific response location was designated for each stimulus. B) The Simon task consists of a congruent condition, under which the locations of stimulus and response are the same, and an incongruent condition, under which the locations of stimulus and response are different.
Mentions: The Simon task was administered to measure error-monitoring. Four stimuli (i.e., a circle, a bright square, a dark square, and a pentagon) were presented, and a specific response location was designated for each stimulus (Fig 1A). The stimulus was randomly presented on either the left or right side of a fixation cross (+) that appeared at the center of the computer monitor, and participants were asked to respond by pressing the button associated with the stimulus as rapidly and accurately as possible. The Simon task consists of a congruent condition, under which the locations of the stimulus and the response-button designated for that stimulus are the same, and an incongruent condition, under which the locations of the stimulus and the button designated for that stimulus are different (Fig 1B). Thus, one congruent and three incongruent conditions could be presented, but this study presented both the congruent and incongruent conditions (360:360 trials) and the three incongruent conditions at the same rate (120:120:120 trials). A total of 780 trials were administered randomly in three blocks and the associations between the stimulus and its response position were changed across the blocks.

Bottom Line: Additionally, ERN amplitude measured at FCz was negatively correlated with the error rate on the Simon task in the schizotypal-trait group but not in the control group.The two groups did not differ in terms of correct-related potentials (CRN), error positivity (Pe) and correct-related positivity (Pc) amplitudes.The present results indicate that individuals with schizotypal traits have deficits in error-monitoring and that reduced ERN amplitudes may represent a biological marker of schizophrenia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Sungshin Women's University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The present study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate deficits in error-monitoring by college students with schizotypal traits. Scores on the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) were used to categorize the participants into schizotypal-trait (n = 17) and normal control (n = 20) groups. The error-monitoring abilities of the participants were evaluated using the Simon task, which consists of congruent (locations of stimulus and response are the same) and incongruent (locations of stimulus and response are different) conditions. The schizotypal-trait group committed more errors on the Simon task and exhibited smaller error-related negativity (ERN) amplitudes than did the control group. Additionally, ERN amplitude measured at FCz was negatively correlated with the error rate on the Simon task in the schizotypal-trait group but not in the control group. The two groups did not differ in terms of correct-related potentials (CRN), error positivity (Pe) and correct-related positivity (Pc) amplitudes. The present results indicate that individuals with schizotypal traits have deficits in error-monitoring and that reduced ERN amplitudes may represent a biological marker of schizophrenia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus